The Green Death

Original Airdate: 19 May, 1973

Episode One

(Llanfairfach colliery has been closed, says the notice on the gate, but underground a scared man is making his way along one of the worked out roadways. Welcome to post industrial Glamorgan, everyone.)

[Outside Global Chemicals]

(A white Range Rover drives through a crowd of locals and into the Research Centre. Security keep the crowd back as a man with a briefcase climbs out and is met by a middle management type.)
ELGIN: Welcome back, sir. What's the news?
STEVENS: All good. How long has this been going on?
ELGIN: Oh, since early this morning. They want to know what is going to happen. We all do.
STEVENS: In that case, I'll tell them.
(Stevens steps onto the Range Rover's tail plate and addresses the crowd.)
STEVENS: I have in my hand a piece of paper which will mean a great deal to all of you. Wealth in our time!
(The crowd responds with derision. Meanwhile the frightened man in the mine has made it back to the lift, and starts up. He notices that the back of his right hand is glowing green.)
STEVENS: When the National Coal Board were forced to close the pit last year
MAN: It were a shame, that was.
STEVENS: No, my friends, we must not be bitter. We must face the facts. Coal is a dying industry.
MAN: Rubbish! Rubbish!
STEVENS: Oil is our future now and the government agrees with me. They have not only given us the go-ahead for our plans, they have promised us money for future expansion! I have it here in black and white!
(Cheers all round.)
STEVENS: Money for all of us! More jobs, more housing, more cars!
(The older folk cheer, but there is a group of long haired hippies off to the side.)
JONES: More muck! More devastation! More death!
MAN: Why don't you shut up and listen.
STEVENS: Who is that? What did he say?
ELGIN: It's that Professor Jones. He's a troublemaker.
STEVENS: The Nobel prize winner?
ELGIN: Yes. Go easy, sir. He gets a lot of coverage in the press.
STEVENS: It seems there are some who do not agree with my vision, the future we hold in our hands. There are always those who resist progress.
JONES: Progress? Don't listen to him. He means fatter profits for Global Chemicals. At the expense of your land!
MAN: Ah, shut your face.
JONES: The very air you breathe! Aye, and the health of you and your kids!
EVANS: It's all right for you. You can afford to live the way you want to. We need the jobs.
MILKMAN: Aye, we can't live on nuts, man.
EVANS: We can't live on nuts.
JONES: Can't you see you're being exploited?
MILKMAN: Ah, shut up!
EVANS: Shut up or we'll shut you up.
STEVENS: No, wait, wait, my friends. Professor Jones is right. We must all share his concern. I assure you that I and my fellow directors
(A siren sound fills the valley.)
EVANS: It's the pit!
MILKMAN: Oh no!
MAN: It's the pit!
EVANS: Right, boys, come on!
(The men run to the old pit head, where the former miner is hanging on to the siren handle, his skin all glowing green. He is most likely dead.)

[UNIT Laboratory]

(Jo is eating an apple at a table when the Doctor comes out of the Tardis with a circuit module. Jo says something with her mouth full.)
DOCTOR: What?
JO: Sorry. I said is that the dematerialisation circuit?
DOCTOR: Oh, no. No more trouble there, thank goodness. I can now take the Tardis wherever and whenever I like. I've got absolute control over her.
JO: Now that the Time Lords have forgiven you.
DOCTOR: Yes, exactly.
JO: What is it, then?
DOCTOR: What, this?
JO: Mmm.
DOCTOR: Well, this is the space time coordinate programmer. The wretched thing's nearly worn out. That's the trouble with the Tardis. She's getting on a bit, you know, Jo.
(Jo speaks again with her mouth full.)
DOCTOR: Look, must you?
JO: I'm sorry. It's my breakfast. I said no wonder we never got to Metebelis Three.
DOCTOR: There's precious little protein in an apple, you know.
JO: Hmm?
DOCTOR: Protein's the thing for breakfast, Jo.
JO: Eggs and bacon, yuk.
DOCTOR: Yes, that's where we're going to next.
JO: Where are we going?
DOCTOR: Metebelis Three. The Tardis can't miss this time. I've actually wired the coordinates into the programmer.
(Jo is reading a newspaper and not listening.)
JO: Oh no! No, they can't!
DOCTOR: I can't wait to go there, you know, Jo.
JO: It's criminal. Absolutely criminal.
DOCTOR: It must be a fascinating place. Just imagine it, a blue sun.
JO: Listen. And at last the Ministry has given the green light to Global Chemicals
DOCTOR: No, not a green light, it's a blue light. Everything's blue there.
JO: Common sense has triumphed at last. Well, don't they realise the pollution it will cause?
DOCTOR: Mmm, absolutely.
JO: And the futile protests of Professor Jones
DOCTOR: You know, I might even get a hold of one of those famous blue sapphires. Well, there you are. That should do it, I think.
JO: He won't give up, you know. A man like Professor Jones will never give up.
DOCTOR: Where are you off to?
JO: To pack a suitcase.
DOCTOR: Oh, good. Give me a couple of minutes and we'll be off.
JO: Off? Off where?
DOCTOR: Well, Metebelis Three, of course.
JO: I'm not going to Metebelis Three.
DOCTOR: Why? Where are you thinking of going to?
JO: Well, South Wales, of course. Llanfairfach.
DOCTOR: Oh, Jo.
JO: You haven't been listening, have you? Honestly, Doctor, you
DOCTOR + JO: never listen to a word I say!

[Engine house]

(The dead man has been laid out respectfully.)
JONES: Well, what was he doing down the pit in the first place?
EVANS: Monthly inspection. Best prop forward we ever had. What killed him? You're a doctor, Doctor Jones.
JONES: I'm not, you know. I'm a biologist. Some sort of gas maybe?
EVANS: But why has he turned green, man?
JONES: I've no idea. Except
EVANS: Expect what?
JONES: Well, that phosphorescent glow. It's almost like you get with putrefaction.
EVANS: That's it then.
JONES: Well, no, after several weeks. He's been dead less than an hour.

[UNIT Laboratory]

DOCTOR: No, no, no!
BRIGADIER: But, Doctor, it's exactly your cup of tea. This fellow's bright green apparently, and dead.
DOCTOR: Lethbridge Stewart, I'm not a policeman. Neither are you, for that matter.
BRIGADIER: Ah, but there are international implications, you see. Possibility of sabotage at Global Chemicals. It's UNIT's duty to protect them. My duty.
DOCTOR: Then do your duty, Brigadier.
BRIGADIER: But, Doctor, surely you must see the
(Jo enters carrying a bag and wearing a white sheepskin trimmed coat.)
BRIGADIER: Ah, Miss Grant, I've a little job for you. I want you to
JO: I'm sorry, Brigadier, I can't.
BRIGADIER: Can't? Can I remind you, Miss Grant, that you are
JO: That I am a member of UNIT. Orders, court martials and all that. But unless you arrest me, I mean, unless you actually seize me and fling me into a dungeon, I
DOCTOR: Ah, Jo, all ready?
JO: Oh dear. Doctor, I mean it. I'm going to go to South Wales because they have got to be stopped.
BRIGADIER: Who's got to be stopped?
JO: Well, Global Chemicals, of course. Can't you see the harm this go ahead will do?
BRIGADIER: No, Miss Grant, I can't. Cheap petrol and lots of it. Exactly what the world needs.
JO: No! No, look it's time to call a halt! It's time that the world awoke to the alarm bell of pollution instead of sliding down the slippery slopes of, of, of, whatever it is.
DOCTOR: A very pretty mixed metaphor.
BRIGADIER: Yes, I seem to recognise the style. This fellow, Jones, isn't it? The Nutcake Professor, isn't that what the papers call him?
JO: That doesn't make him wrong, does it.
BRIGADIER: And you want to go down there to help him in his noble fight against the windmills, down to Llanfairfach.
JO: I'm sorry, Brigadier. I'm going to go even if it means resigning from UNIT.
BRIGADIER: Ah. Well, we can discuss that on the way down, can't we?
JO: You mean
BRIGADIER: You will at least accept a lift, I trust? Yes, Miss Grant, I'm going there too. Also the Doctor, I hope?
DOCTOR: I'm going to Metebelis Three.
BRIGADIER: Wouldn't like to have to order you, Doctor.
DOCTOR: I wouldn't advise you to try.
BRIGADIER: Yes. Ten minutes, Miss Grant.
(The Brigadier leaves.)
DOCTOR: Metebelis Three, Jo? Where else would you like to go? You choose for yourself.
JO: But I've only got ten minutes.
DOCTOR: Jo, you've got all the time in the world, and all the space. I'm offering them to you.
JO: But, Doctor, don't you understand? I've got to go! This Professor Jones, he's fighting for everything that's important, everything that you've fought for. In a funny way, he reminds me of a sort of younger you.
DOCTOR: I don't know whether to feel flattered or insulted. It's all right, Jo, I understand.
JO: Oh, Doctor! Thank you.
DOCTOR: Jo?
JO: Hmm?
DOCTOR: Tell the Brigadier that I'll follow him down.
JO: Right.
DOCTOR: Later.
JO: Right. Bye!
DOCTOR: Goodbye.
(Jo leaves.)
DOCTOR: So the fledgling flies the coop.
(The Doctor enters the Tardis and it dematerialises.)

[Llanfairfach]

(The Brigadier stops his natty white open top Mercedes - BLC7B - by the milk float. He is not in uniform.)
BRIGADIER: Excuse me? Can you tell me the way to Global Chemicals, please? The research place?
MILKMAN: Well, if you don't turn off the straight road ahead, you can't miss it, can you. It's just past the chapel on the hill, isn't it.
(Which is what Llanfairfach means, isn't it, look you, boyo.)
JO: And the Wholeweal community?
MILKMAN: I beg your pardon, Miss?
JO: The Wholeweal? Oh, you know, Professor Jones.
MILKMAN: Oh, the Nuthutch. Well, you'll be passing the Nuthutch on the mountain, won't you.
BRIGADIER: Right, thank you.
MILKMAN: You're welcome, boyo.
JO: Boyo.

[Wholeweal Community]

(A psychedelic 60's style sign marks the place, which is a farm. A bullock watches Jo get out of the car.)
JO: Thanks for the lift.
BRIGADIER: Not sure that I approve, Miss Grant. Duty is duty when all's said and done.
JO: Well a girl's got to do what a girl's got to do. Sir.
BRIGADIER: Mmm.
JO: Bye!
(Jo heads off to a sign saying Spore Store and Toadstools What's More.)
BRIGADIER: The Doctor's no better, gallivanting off on a pleasure jaunt at a time like this.
(The Tardis materialises on a very blue planet. There is a screeching sound and a long tentacle grabs him.)

[Community house]

(Jo opens the front door, making a bell ring.)
JO: Hello? Hello?
(She puts her bag down and reads the sign on a door.)
JO: Room for living. Hmm, like it. Anybody home?
(She tries the door opposite, labelled Watch It Toadstools Professors.)
JONES [OC]: Come in.

[Jones' laboratory]

(A man is half hidden in a wicker chair hanging from the ceiling. Very 60's, very Prisoner.)
JONES: No one in.
JO: You are.
JONES: Did my stint in the fields before breakfast, didn't I.
JO: Oh, I see. They're all out in the fields.
JONES: Aye, that's what I said. No work, no food. Logically, esthetically and morally right. Right?
JO: Right, I suppose.
JONES: Well, now, what. Shut the blasted door! Of all the silly young goats.
(Jones checks a thermometer in a tray of fungi.)
JO: Oh, I'm sorry. What did I do?
JONES: Probably ruined a month's work, that's all. Can't you read? It said on the door to watch it, didn't it?
JO: Yes.
JONES: Half a degree drop and
JO: Well, I. Ow!
(Jo walks into the corner of the workbench.)
JO: For goodness sakes.
JONES: No, no, no - not there, you'll have the lot over. Not there either. You'll contaminate my spores.
JO: Where can I go, for Pete's sake?
JONES: Well, just try standing still, my love, eh? Tell us the dreadful news. You've come to join us, right?
JO: Well, yes, in a way. You see, I'm Jo Grant. I rang from London. I spoke to somebody who said her name was Mum.
JONES: Mum? Oh, our Nancy that is. Yeah, Nancy with a laughing face. She didn't tell me.
JO: Well, why should she? You see, I've come to see Professor Jones, not you.
JONES: Oh.
JO: So if you could tell me where I could wait?
(Jones ignores her so she leans on the desk next to him and knocks some stuff onto the floor.)
JO: I said, if you could
JONES: Look. Look, Why not just have a stool over here. And careful, now! Look, that's it. Just sit there and simmer down. All right? Right. There, we've got off on the wrong foot, haven't we. Still I suppose you can't help being a bit cloth-headed. You're only a kid, after all.
JO: Charming.
JONES: Hey, welcome to the Nuthutch!
JO: Huh!
(Meanwhile, jacket torn and face dirty, the Doctor is running for his life from loud and unfriendly creatures. The Professor continues to do calculations at his desk.)
JONES: Do you know anything about entomology?
JO: Insects?
JONES: Mmm.
JO: Yes, a little.
JONES: Right. What's got twenty legs, a yellow body about two inches long and big red pincers on the front end?
JO: Hmm. Don't know. Why?
JONES: There's one crawling up your left leg.
JO: Argh! There's nothing there.
JONES: No, I couldn't stand the silence any longer.
(The Doctor is climbing a rock face as snow settles on him.)
JO: But why toadstools?
JONES: Oh, that's just our Nancy's little joke.
JONES: This is really our new hybrid fungus, Saliota Orbis.
(It has a red and white cap.)
JO: Pardon?
JONES: It's a sort of cousin of the mushroom you can buy in the shops.
JO: You mean you can eat it?
JONES: Oh yes, that's the whole point. Well, the world's going to need something instead of meat. High protein fungus can be just the answer.
JO: Well, yes. Yes, of course!
JONES: You see, Jo, we haven't set up this community just to drop out. I mean, let's face it, who does like the petrol stinking, plastic rat-trap life we all live? No, no. If we're going to make a success here at Wholeweal, we've got to do something that's going to help the entire world. So we're a biotechnic research unit as well as a Nuthutch.
JO: But that's marvellous! Did he think of that? The Professor, I mean?
JONES: Well, I could never have got it off the ground without the Nobel prize money.
JO: But (the penny drops) Are you Professor Jones?
JONES: Your obedient servant, ma'am.

[Stevens' office]

STEVENS: We've sunk a great deal of time and money into this new project, and we're not going to stand by and see it wasted. Now your job, Brigadier, is
BRIGADIER: Oh, forgive me, sir, but I know quite well what my job is. We'll look after you, never fear.
STEVENS: I beg your pardon. I had no intention of
BRIGADIER: Equally, I'm quite certain also that it's my job to find out about this man's death. Events like that are the very reason UNIT was created.
STEVENS: I see. What do you intend to do?
BRIGADIER: Get hold of the Doctor at once. May I use your phone?
STEVENS: Yes, of course. Elgin, get an outside line, will you?
ELGIN: Sir.
(The Doctor has climbed up to a ledge where there is a crop of huge sapphires. The telephone rings in the UNIT laboratory. Something with large wings approaches in the blue gloom and the Doctor ducks out of the way of talons a good metre or so across. The telephone stops ringing.)
BRIGADIER: (into phone) I see. All right, keep trying and ring me here as soon as you do get an answer, understood? Yes. Right, goodbye. Mister Stevens, I wonder if you'd explain to me exactly why Professor Jones and his friends should object to your new process?
STEVENS: I wish I could tell you. After all, he and the rest of the doom merchants never stop telling us that we're using up the world's supply of oil. We can now produce twenty five percent more petrol and diesel fuel from a given quantity of crude oil. If that isn't conservation, I don't know what is.

[Jones' laboratory]

JONES: But it's still using up the oil and doubling the atmospheric pollution. No, the world has got to find ways of using the energy the sun is giving us now.
JO: Well, like what, for instance?
JONES: Well, like using the movement of the wind and the tides and the rivers. Well, I mean, like here at the Nuthutch. Well, you are quite warm?
JO: The ambient temperature suits me fine, thank you.
JONES: Heat from the river. And the heat pump works on electricity generated by a windmill. Alternative technology, see.
JO: And no waste, no pollution!
JONES: Exactly.

[Stevens' office]

BRIGADIER: No waste? No pollution from an oil refinery?
STEVENS: Minimal. Negligible.
BRIGADIER: Well, I'm no scientist, Mister Stevens, but I find that somewhat difficult to believe.
ELGIN: Oh, it's been one of our strongest selling points. It makes nonsense of the objections. We've been able, in all sincerity, to assure the government, the people, indeed the world, that the Stevens process is clean.

[Jones' laboratory]

JONES: The Steven's process must be based on Bateson's polymerisation, and that means thousands of gallons of waste. Aye, a thick sludge you can't break down in any way, like a liquid plastic. And what properties that would have, heaven alone knows.
JO: And you're wondering what they're going to do with it?
JONES: I wondering what they're doing with it now. And I can't help thinking that there must be some connection with Hughes' death.
JO: You mean they're pumping the waste down into the old mine workings?
JONES: Aye, could be.
JO: Well then, let's go and have a look.
JONES: Oh, that's a good idea.
JO: I mean, I mean like now.
JONES: My dear good child, I've got work to do.
JO: You're being patronising.
JONES: Aye, so I am. But I've still got work to do.
JO: Oh!
JONES: Shut the door!
(Jo slams the door on her way out.)

[Pithead office]

(The former miners are still at the colliery, drinking tea.)
EVANS: It's plain stupid, man. Here we are, sitting about nattering like the women after chapel, and we still don't know what killed him.
BERT: Finding out won't do him any good now.
EVANS: No, but it'll do me a lot of good, though, all this waiting.
DAVE: Ah, well, it could be dangerous, man.
(Talfryn Thomas, as genuine a Welshman as you can get.)
EVANS: Dangerous? I've spent twenty years of my life down there. Think it scares me now?
BERT: Oh, why bother?
DAVE: Aye, don't panic, man.
EVANS: I'm going down.

[Stevens' office]

STEVENS: Therefore, I think it imperative that nobody should go down the mine. It must be sealed off completely.
BRIGADIER: I'm afraid I must disagree, sir. Indeed, I intend to make the investigation of that mine my first priority as soon as the Doctor arrives.
STEVENS: If he ever does arrive.
(The Doctor is running back to the Tardis as large things throw rocks at him. He gets inside just as spears hit the door.)

[UNIT Laboratory]

(The telephone is ringing as the Tardis materialises. The Doctor staggers out and answers it.)
DOCTOR: Hello? I'll speak to anyone.
(Bessie hurtles along a country road at illegal speeds towards Llanfairfach.)

[Engine house]

(Bert has got his hard hat and other safety equipment on. He signals the engine room from the lift.)
DAVE: Okay.
(Dave sends the lift down.)

[Stevens' office]

(The Brigadier watches Bessie drive in from the office window.)
BRIGADIER: At last. Now we can get on. Will you excuse me, sir?
STEVENS: Do you still intend to go investigate the mine?
BRIGADIER: Indeed I do.
(The Brigadier leaves. Stevens uses his intercom.)
STEVENS: Hinks. At once.
(His chauffeur enters.)
HINKS: Sir?
STEVENS: Hinks, I want you to. I want you to
HINKS: You all right, sir?
STEVENS: Yes, yes. (mutters) Nobody must go down the mine. Hinks. Nobody must go down the mine. Nobody.
HINKS: Yes, sir. You're sure you're all right?
STEVENS: Yes, yes, of course. Go on, get on with it.
(Hinks leaves. Stevens locks the door then goes to a console by the wall and uncovers a headset with a cable. He plugs it into the console and puts it on. A sound goes through his head.)

[Engine house]

BERT: Here, maybe we shouldn't have let Dai go down there himself?
DAVE: Well, I tell you now, boy, I once tried to stop him having a drink too many at the club, and I can still feel the bruises. And that's a fact.
BERT: Aye.
(Jo enters.)
DAVE: Oh, hello, who's this now then?
BERT: Here, private property this is.
JO: Oh, I'm
DAVE: Aye.
JO: I'm sorry, but you see I'm with the UNIT people and I was wondering if I could take a look down the mine.
DAVE: Yeah, well, not without authority you can't.
JO: Oh. Well, where do I get it?
BERT: NCB, Cardiff.
(A phone buzzes.)
DAVE: Hang on here a minute. Hello. Who is it?

[Bottom of the lift]

(Dai Evans' hand is glowing green.)
EVANS: Dave! Help me, Dave! Help me!
DAVE [OC]: Dai? What's happened? What's the matter?
EVANS: Help me, quick! Help!
(Evans collapses.)

[Engine house]

DAVE: Dai's in trouble.
BERT: Then we've got to get him out. I'll go down. You work the cage, Dave.
JO: Well I'm coming, too.
BERT: Oh, don't be daft.
JO: Well look, I'm trained in first aid. I might be able to help save your friend's life.
DAVE: Do you mean that?
JO: Yes.
DAVE: Yeah, well she's got something there, Bert. You take her down and look after her.
BERT: Right, come on with me now. We'll get you a helmet and lamp. JO: Right.

[Llanfairfach colliery]

(Bessie is driving up to the mine.)
BRIGADIER: So I thought I'd better get you here at once to have a look.
DOCTOR: Yes, you're quite right, Brigadier. Nobody must go down that mine until I've had a chance to do just that.
(Hinks watches them go past. Now dressed in overalls, helmets and other safety gear, Jo and Bert signal Dave to lower the lift. The Brigadier sees the pit head wheel turning.)
BRIGADIER: Someone's going down!
DOCTOR: We must stop them!

[Engine house]

DOCTOR: Who's in the cage?
DAVE: Oh, it it's Bert Pritchard and the young lady from UNIT.
DOCTOR: Well, stop winding!
DAVE: No, I can't do that. They've gone down below to help Dai Evans.
DOCTOR: Stop winding, I said!
(Dave pulls the brake lever.)
DOCTOR: Quickly, man, quickly!
DAVE: I can't! The brake won't work. It's out of control!
DOCTOR: What?

Episode Two

[Colliery lift]

BERT: Its running away! Hang on! Try and hang on!
(Bert mostly hangs on to Jo and they both fall onto the floor of the cage.)

[Engine house]

DAVE: The clutch and brake are both gone!
DOCTOR: What? There's only one thing to do!
(The Doctor jams a metal bar in next to the main flywheel to try and slow it.)
DOCTOR: Right, reverse the motor!
DAVE: That won't work! She'll get a cable break.
DOCTOR: Don't argue, man. Do as I say. Brigadier, help me!
(The Brigadier helps the Doctor with his improvised brake shoe as Dave battles with the proper brake and clutch mechanism. Gradually the winding gear slows.)
DAVE: It's slowing! As long the cable holds.
(Something goes bang, and smoke pours from the flywheel.)
BRIGADIER: It seems to have seized up.
DOCTOR: Yes.
DAVE: Here, I hand it to you, boyo. Another few moments and they'd have had it.
DOCTOR: How deep are they?
DAVE: Nearly six hundred yards.
DOCTOR: How deep's the shaft?
DAVE: Six hundred yards.

[Colliery lift]

(Jo and Bert wake.)
JO: Bert? Bert? Are you all right?
BERT: Oh, I think so.
JO: What happened?
BERT: It felt like brake failure. Can't happen in theory. Steady, love.
JO: How are we going to get out of here?
BERT: Oh, not up, that's for sure.
(Bert opens a door in the side of the cage.)
BERT: Steady now, steady.
(Bert takes something metal from his pocket and drops it. Clang.)
BERT: About twenty feet? That was really close. Ah, let's try to get down now.
JO: Well, can't they haul us up in the cage?
BERT: I doubt it. Anyway, we ought to get out of here. Listen to that cable. It could go at any second, that.
(Bert drops a length of rope out of the cage.)
BERT: Right, there you go, Blodwyn.
JO: Right. Bert?
BERT: Eh?
JO: Do you mind going down first?
BERT: All right, love. Here goes.
JO: Thanks. Careful. Okay.
(Jo follows Bert down.)

[Engine house]

(Dave examines the Doctor's handiwork.)
DAVE: It's hopeless, man. The friction has welded it together. It's just scrap metal.
BRIGADIER: What about the other shaft?
DAVE: No, it's a counterweight lift system, see. As one goes down, the other one comes up. So if one is jammed, so is the other.
DOCTOR: Well, can you rig a donkey engine and a pulley system? If we can free the other cage, we could use that.
DAVE: I suppose so, but it would be dangerous.
DOCTOR: We'll just have to risk that. Mind you, it'd mean cutting the cable.
DAVE: Yes, well, we haven't got any cutting equipment, you see? I mean, the mine's been out of action a year. But I know where we can get some.
DOCTOR: Oh, where?
DAVE: Global Chemicals.

[Bottom of the lift]

BERT: Okay?
JO: Yes.
BERT: Watch your feet now.
JO: Right.
(Bert tries the telephone by the shaft.)
BERT: Ah, useless. Oh, the wire must have broken when the cage fell.
JO: Oh, come on!
(They hear groan.)
BERT: Hey, it's Dai!
JO: He's in a bad way.
BERT: It's the same as poor Ted Hughes. Look!
(Evan's skin is glowing green.)

[Elgin's office]

(Little more than a cupboard with a desk, typewriter, filing cabinet and phone, into which he speaks.)
ELGIN: Good heavens. Is anyone hurt? I see. Do you think you can get down to them? Cutting equipment? Why yes, we
(The line suddenly goes dead.)

[Pithead office]

BRIGADIER: Cut off!
(The Brigadier dials again but Stevens switches all the incoming lines to busy.)
BRIGADIER: Well, now it's engaged.
DAVE: Look, try the Wholeweal people. Jones the nutcake. They might have equipment for cutting cables, see?

[Community house]

JONES: Cutting a cable? What cable? Why? What? Miss Grant? But why was she? Look, I'll come right over. No, no, we haven't, but Global Chemicals have. Well, yes, definitely. We tried to borrow it a few weeks back. Aye.

[Stevens' office]

FELL: But why me?
STEVENS: You're my senior man. They'll believe you.
FELL: I'm sorry, Mister Stevens, but I can't do it.
STEVENS: Of course you can, Fell. You must.
FELL: It was too late to save the miner. He was already dead, but this? Well, to leave them trapped down there, it's, well, it's murder!
STEVENS: Don't be ridiculous man. They'll never have survived a fall like that. I just need a little more time, that's all. That mine must not be investigated. You know that as well as I do.
FELL: One death is enough!
(Hinks blocks the doorway.)
FELL: Will you please get out of my way?
BOSS: Stevens?
(Stevens turns and talks to a computer monitor. Lines appear on it, matching the voice.)
STEVENS: Yes?
BOSS: Process him.
STEVENS: Is that wise?
BOSS: It is necessary. Do as I say. Process.
STEVENS: Very well.
FELL: Who was that?
STEVENS: Our boss. Yours and mine.
FELL: I don't understand.
STEVENS: You will, Fell. Very soon.

[Bottom of the lift]

JO: I can hardly feel his pulse. Have you ever seen anything like it before?
BERT: No, never.
JO: What could have caused it?
BERT: Dunno. I tell you what though
JO: What?
BERT: Whatever it was, it's still down here with us.

[Stevens' office]

(The Brigadier is with Stevens and Elgin when Fell enters.)
STEVENS: Ah, Mister Fell. Our friend the Brigadier, needs our help. I'm afraid there's been another accident.
FELL: Yes, sir. I heard.
STEVENS: Good, good, now
BRIGADIER: Look, we need some cutting equipment, oxy-acetylene, that sort of thing, and we need it fast.
FELL: I'm very sorry, Brigadier, but we have nothing of that kind.
BRIGADIER: What, in a place of this size?
FELL: The emergency equipment was withdrawn some time ago, to be replaced by thermic lances. They have not yet arrived.
STEVENS: Oh dear, oh dear, you'll think we're woefully ill-equipped.
BRIGADIER: I find it very hard to believe.
STEVENS: You're not accusing him of being deliberately obstructive, I hope?
BRIGADIER: No, of course not.
STEVENS: Of course not. But you still have this problem, haven't you? Oh, have you tried Professor Jones. Oh no, now I come to think of it they tried to borrow ours
BRIGADIER: Excuse me.
(The Brigadier and Stevens leave.)
STEVENS [OC]: Yesterday, so presumably they can't have any
ELGIN: What on Earth's going on, Ralph? We must have some cutting tools here. Damn it, people's lives are at stake!
FELL: I have given an exact account of the position.
ELGIN: You feeling quite well?
FELL: Perfectly. I must go.
ELGIN: No, hang about, old son. No panic. I've been wanting to have a word with you.
FELL: About what?
ELGIN: Oh, our revered lord and master, friend Stevens.
FELL: Well?
ELGIN: It strikes me he's a bit too keen to hush up the green man bit. Is there something I don't know?
FELL: I cannot discuss our Director with you, Elgin.
ELGIN: Elgin?
FELL: Your attitude will be reported.
ELGIN: Reported? You sound like a head prefect.
FELL: Disloyalty cannot be tolerated.
ELGIN: Oh, we're not in the army now, you know.
FELL: The Director shall hear of this.

[Global Chemicals]

(The Brigadier gets into his car and operates his UNIT radio.)
BRIGADIER: Greyhound to Trap One. Over?
UNIT [OC]: Trap one. Go ahead, Greyhound. Over.
BRIGADIER: Let me talk to Captain Yates.

[Bottom of the lift]

BERT: Scared?
JO: A bit.
(There is a loud sound some way away.)
JO: What was that?
BERT: Oh, it's only a touch of settling, love. The old mine's snoring a bit, isn't she?
JO: Oh, what are they doing up there, Bert?
BERT: It takes time, girl. It takes time.

[Pithead office]

(Jones has arrived.)
DAVE: (into phone) Hello, NCB? Llanfairfach here. Look, there's been more trouble. Yes, another accident.
(The Doctor enters.)
DOCTOR: Well, that's where you're wrong.
DAVE: Hang on a minute, will you? What is that you say?
DOCTOR: Do you recognise that?
DAVE: Yes, it's a cotter pin.
(Looks like a large bolt to me.)
DOCTOR: Yes, precisely. I found it on the floor. It had been removed from the brake linkage. This was no accident, Mister Davies. This was deliberate sabotage.

[Bottom of the lift]

JO: He's much worse. We can't just stay here.
BERT: What else can we do?
JO: But he might die.
BERT: Hang on. I've just thought of something.
JO: What?
BERT: Well, the last time I got trapped, it was over in the west seam. There was an emergency shaft sunk there.
JO: Well, can we get to it?
BERT: Well, the whole seam was filled up right after. Too dangerous to work any more, they said. But the shaft might still be open.
JO: Well, it's better than staying here.
BERT: I wonder if I can remember the way, though. Got a bit of paper?
JO: Er, yes.

[Engine house]

(The Brigadier enters as everyone is poring over a map.)
DOCTOR: What about the west seam here. Can we reach them through there?
DAVE: No, that's closed after a bad fall. Fourteen killed.
BRIGADIER: No luck, Doctor, they haven't got any.
DOCTOR: That's ridiculous!
BRIGADIER: Thought it a bit funny myself.
DAVE: Well, that's nonsense, man. We had the equipment up here a fortnight ago. I took it back myself. It's in the storage shed behind the power house.
BRIGADIER: Well, I've only quoted what the technical fellow told me.
JONES: You should have insisted!
BRIGADIER: Er, who's
DAVE: Oh, this is Professor Jones.
DOCTOR: Is it, indeed? I hadn't realised. I've been wanting to meet you for a long time. Your paper on DNA synthesis was quite remarkable for your age.
JONES: A promising youngster, huh?
DOCTOR: No, no, no, I mean for the age that you live in. Now, you were about to make a suggestion, I believe, Professor?
JONES: Why don't we just go back to Global Chemicals and take the equipment by force if necessary?
BRIGADIER: Out of the question. Now then, let's talk sense, shall we? Now, where's the nearest town where we can get some cutting equipment? Newport?
DAVE: Well, that's the nearest, yes, but it's quite a way from here.
BRIGADIER: Well, better get started then.
DAVE: I'll come with you. I know the place fairly well. It's near the gasworks. (Dave and the Brigadier leave.)
DOCTOR: You know, Global Chemicals is beginning to interest me. Tell me, Professor, do you know the layout?
JONES: Aye, very well. Are you thinking what I'm thinking?

[Global Chemicals]

(A small procession with flute, drum, cymbals and an accordion approaches the main gate. A guard toes into his hut and gets on the intercom.)
GUARD: All security units to front section.
(It's the long haired hippies with Stevens Out, Save Our Valley from Pollution and GC = Global Corruption placards. They are led by Professor Jones on base drum.)
GUARD: Demonstration at main gate. I repeat. All security units to front section. Demonstration at main gate. Assist.
(Other security come running from all over the complex.)
JONES: Stevens out! Stevens out!
(A South Wales Electricity board Land Rover pulls up to the electric fence at the back of the complex. It has a cherry-picker fitted to the back. The Doctor gets out of the vehicle and into the cherry picker, then hoists himself safely over the fence and drops out on the other side. He consults Jones' map and heads off, failing to notice a sensor in the grass near the main buildings.)

[Stevens' office]

COMPUTER: Ground sensors picking up unauthorised footsteps, power house section. Cameras alerted.
(A camera follows the Doctor.)
COMPUTER: Picture available.
BOSS: Who is this?
STEVENS: One of the UNIT personnel. I saw him talking to the Brigadier earlier. What instructions?
BOSS: No action. Yet.
COMPUTER: Entering number six sector into main storage area.
STEVENS: Shall I terminate him?
BOSS: Negative. Apprehend him. Find out his function and purpose.

[Global Chemicals yard]

(The Doctor sees his final destination and runs across the yard, but a voice comes over the loud hailer.)
GUARD [OC]: Stop! Stand still! Perfectly still! Put your hands above your head!
(The Doctor obeys. A shutter door lifts to reveal Hinks and two guards.)

[Mine roadway]

(They are called roadways because of the tracks that run through them for coal wagons to move along.)
JO: Bert? Bert, I
BERT: Oh, never fear, Blodwyn, Bert is here! Come on.

[Global Chemicals yard]

(Hinks has a small hand weapon.)
HINKS: Well, well, well, bit old to play games, ain't we?
DOCTOR: I'm quite spry for my age, actually.
HINKS: Oh, going to have a go? Terrific.
DOCTOR: Hai!
(And pushes the weapon aside and Hinks to the ground. One guard gets a full body throw and the other several chops for daring to try and use a baton on the Doctor. Then they both get thrown together, and give up.)
DOCTOR: Venusian Aikido, gentlemen. I do hope I haven't hurt you.
(Four guards armed with rifles run round the corner. The Doctor runs to an area where there are large pipes, but his exits are sealed by barred gates sliding across.)
STEVENS: Who are you? What do you want?
DOCTOR: I'm afraid you have me under several disadvantages, sir. Whom am I addressing?
STEVENS: Forgive me. My name is Stevens. I'm the Director of this project.
DOCTOR: Yes, and very efficient it is too, if I may say so.
STEVENS: Thank you. You were about to explain your purpose.
DOCTOR: It's really quite simple. I'm attached to UNIT as a scientific advisor.
STEVENS: Ah, the errant Doctor.
DOCTOR: We urgently need cutting equipment at the mine. You have refused to give it. Now my information is that it is stored in that shed over there.
STEVENS: My dear Doctor, you could have saved yourself all this bother. Why didn't you ask to see me? Please help yourself.
(Hinks presses a button and the barred gates slide open. Two more guards open the shed. It is empty.)
STEVENS: You see?
DOCTOR: Hmm.
HINKS: Come on, Doctor.
(Elgin watches them go.)

[Mine roadway]

JO: It's getting very stuffy in here.
BERT: Oh, take deeper breaths now. That's better. Come on.

[Llanfairfach colliery]

(The Brigadier and Bert return with the cutting equipment and cylinders.)
DAVE: Come on, lads, look sharp.

[Pithead office]

DOCTOR: The breaking strength at this point should be something in the region of a hundred and twenty three point thirty six pounds.
JONES: Aye, that's right.
DOCTOR: Well, you're back quickly, Brigadier.
BRIGADIER: Sheer luck actually, Doctor. Stopped for petrol and there was a fellow in the corner of the garage cutting up an old banger. Everything under control here?
DOCTOR: Thank you, yes.
BRIGADIER: Good.

[Engine house]

BRIGADIER: Right, will it take you long to set it up?
DAVE: No, not long once we get started, see?
BRIGADIER: Good. Right, well, I'll find some gear.
DAVE: Oh no, it's my job to go down, isn't it. I mean, it's my responsibility, isn't it.
BRIGADIER: As the one in charge
DAVE: Look here, you're not in charge of me, man.
JONES: If you want a volunteer
BRIGADIER: Look, there's no question of a volunteer.
DOCTOR: Indeed there isn't, Brigadier. Jo and the others need my help now. So, if Mister Davies and some of his colleagues would come with me?
DAVE: Oh, you couldn't stop me, man.

[Mine roadway]

JO: Can't we stop for a bit, Bert?
BERT: What? No. Once you start, you've got to keep going.
JO: Is it much further?
BERT: Oh, we'll take a breather when we get there.
JO: Okay.
BERT: Come on now.
(Up top they start cutting the lift cable. Once he is through, he signals for the Doctor, Dave and two others to enter the second cage. Down they go.)
BERT: Right, come on. Nearly there. Oh, here we are, love. Oh, good. We'll take a rest now. Yes.
JO: Oh, I couldn't, I couldn't have gone another step.
BERT: Oh, we have about another hundred feet or so and then we start to go up. If we can do that, we'll find the emergency shaft. Oh, it only goes up for about forty five degrees and it comes out on the hillside. Oh, better save the lamps, eh?
JO: Right. Okay.
(But it doesn't go completely dark. There is a green tinge to everything.)
JO: Bert? How can light get down here?
BERT: Well, it can't.
JO: Then how can I see you?
BERT: Hey, that's funny.
JO: What's that smell? It's like something rotting.
BERT: Hey, look.
(A trickle of green something is running down the wall.)
JO: Ugh, that smell. What is it?
BERT: I don't know. I've never seen anything like that before.
JO: I wouldn't touch
(Too late.)
BERT: Argh! It burns!

[Bottom of the lift]

DAVE: Here's Dai.
DOCTOR: Don't touch him.
(Evans is fully luminous green.)
DOCTOR: He's dead. Come on, we'll find the others.
DAVE: Yes, but they might
DOCTOR: Jo?
DAVE: They might be dead too.
DOCTOR: Jo? Where are you?
DAVE: Look, Doctor.
(Dave finds the piece of paper by the telephone.)
DOCTOR: (reads) Couldn't wait any longer. Gone to find another way out. Jo. The idiots. Why didn't they wait?
DAVE: That looks like a map of the mine.
DOCTOR: Yes, of course. That's the west seam. Come on. Let's go after them.
DAVE: Doctor? You can't go on your own. You don't know the mine. Look, you two take Dai Evans up and send the cage back for us. I'll come with you, Doctor.

[West seam roadway]

BERT: Hey, it's my turn to feel tired now. I must be getting on.
JO: Come on, Bert, keep going. It's not far now.

[Mine roadway]

DOCTOR: Jo?
DAVE: Bert?
DOCTOR: Jo, can you hear me?
DAVE: Bert? (something welsh)

[West seam roadway]

JO: That's it. That's it.
BERT: Oh, it's no use. I can't go on. Oh, I feel so weak, oh so bad
(They see that the fingers that touched the green yuk are starting to glow.)
BERT: That means I've had it. Like Dai.
JO: No, it doesn't. Look, we'll find help.
BERT: No, it's no use. You must go on.
JO: But I can't leave you, too.
BERT: It's my only chance.
JO: But I can't.
BERT: You must! You must. Please, go on.
JO: All right. I'll be as quick as I can.

[Mine roadway]

(The Doctor nearly dislodges a pit prop.)
DOCTOR: What's that light?
DAVE: Where?
DOCTOR: Up ahead, there.
DAVE: Bert? (something welsh)
DOCTOR: The light's green.
BERT: Put our lights out then, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Come on. What an extraordinary smell. Come on.
(The Doctor sees the green trickling down the wall.)
DOCTOR: What is this stuff? No, don't touch it. Come on, let's get on.

[West seam roadway]

DAVE: Look, here's Bert!
DOCTOR: Where?
DAVE: Bert? Bert?
(Dave speaks welsh to comfort him.)
DOCTOR: Dave, look at his hand!
BERT: It burns, burns.
DOCTOR: Where's the girl?
BERT: Gone on ahead.
DOCTOR: Take him up to the surface, quickly as you can. Let the professor take a look at him.
DAVE: What about you?
DOCTOR: I'm going on ahead to look for Jo. Tell the Brigadier that I'll find her and bring her back, but don't let anybody come down looking after us. You understand?
DAVE: Yes, Doctor.
DOCTOR: It's far too dangerous.

[Cavern roadway]

(Jo goes past some large chains and comes to an entrance to an underground cavern. There are thousands of giant maggots milling around in the green light. She backs away.)
DOCTOR: Jo? Jo, are you there?
JO [OC]: Doctor! Here, quickly!
(They meet.)
JO: Doctor! Doctor, it's horrible!
DOCTOR: What is it?
(He sees for himself.)
DOCTOR: Good grief! Come on!
(They go back past the chains, then there is a rumbling sound and part of the roadway caves in. Maggots tumble in through the fissures and make for the fresh meat, hissing.)

Episode Three

[Cavern roadway]

JO: There's no way out.
DOCTOR: Nil desperandum, Jo.
JO: But, Doctor, those things crawling around in that green stuff. You saw what happened to the others.
DOCTOR: We mustn't let them touch us, must we. Now, how do we get out of here?
JO: What about those? Any good?
(A derailed coal wagon.)
DOCTOR: Lift it up. Right now, push it over.
(They get the wagon back on the rails.)

[Engine house]

(An ambulance is taking the casualties away.)
DAVE: If anything happens to Bert too, I don't know what I'll do.
JONES: It was their own decision to go down, man. You can't count it your fault. No, it's obvious who's responsible. Global Chemicals. We'll have to go down.
(The Brigadier enters.)
DAVE: No! No, the Doctor, he was most emphatic. It's too dangerous. On no account, go down.
JONES: But that girl, man! She's in terrible danger.
BRIGADIER: It may surprise you to learn, Professor Jones, that Miss Grant is one of my staff. I think that she and the Doctor are quite capable of looking after themselves.
JONES: Two people, possibly three, have died already. She may be next. I'm going down even if you're not.
BRIGADIER: Professor Jones, believe me, my concern for Miss Grant is as deep as yours. Probably more so. The Doctor knows what he's doing.
JONES: Very well, but you must do something. It's got to be stopped, man. It's gone too far!
BRIGADIER: Far too far. I quite agree. I think it's time that I paid Global Chemicals another visit.

[Cavern roadway]

(Jo has climbed into the wagon.)
DOCTOR: Get a hold of this pole. Take it over that side.
JO: Right.
DOCTOR: Make room for me.
(The Doctor gets into the wagon and prepares to push it along like a punt.)
DOCTOR: Right, you ready?
JO: Yeah.
DOCTOR: Off we go. No, not that way. The rail's blocked. This way. Through the cave here.
JO: Through those things?
DOCTOR: Well, it's only about a foot deep.
JO: I can't. I just can't!
DOCTOR: Jo, we haven't got any alternative.
JO: Doctor, it's not that I'm afraid, exactly, it's just, it's just those maggots.
DOCTOR: Then close your eyes.
JO: All right.
DOCTOR: Good girl. That's it. Right, now punt way.
(They propel the wagon through the mass of maggots.)

[Global Chemicals corridor]

ELGIN: Have you heard? They brought another two out of the mine. One dead and the other dying.
FELL: Yes, I heard.
ELGIN: Is that all you can say? Do you feel no responsibility at all?
FELL: I? Why should I?
ELGIN: You told them we had no cutting equipment, and you knew we had, and I'm sure you know something about what's going on down in that mine.
FELL: No, I
(Fell puts his hands to his face, in pain, then recovers.)
ELGIN: Oh, for heaven's sake, man. Tell the truth. Others might die if you don't.
FELL: You are mistaken.
(Fell goes into a nearby room, which controls the pumping operations. He takes a clipboard from the wall and sits at a console. Elgin sneaks in and hides behind some large vertical pipes to watch.

[Cavern roadway]

DOCTOR: Well, I've heard of boating lakes, but this is ridiculous. A bit more. Right, that'll do. Right, get rid of your pole.
(The wagon is clear of the green slime and maggots. They climb out of it.)
DOCTOR: Come on. That's it. Well done, Jo.
JO: Now what?
DOCTOR: We go up this crevice. It was marked on the map.
JO: How do you know it leads to the surface?
DOCTOR: Well, that stuff must have come down here from somewhere. If there's a way down, there's a way up. I think I know where it leads to. Come on, you go first.

[Stevens' office]

BRIGADIER: No, there's no question of it, sir. This is now a security matter and UNIT's taking charge. My people will be arriving as soon as possible.
STEVENS: Yes, but surely
BRIGADIER: Now this cannot be dealt with locally. Now, I intend to request a full international investigation under the auspices of the United Nations. There's too much at stake.
STEVENS: Indeed! Indeed! Our work here is of international importance. However, I would point out a certain risk. Should it be thought that we are in any way connected with these deaths, my whole project might be closed down. Sentimental fools are always with us.
BRIGADIER: If it would become advisable to close down your plant
STEVENS: That must never happen!
BRIGADIER: Mister Stevens, two of my friends are still down there in that mine in the gravest danger. If I consider it necessary to close Global Chemicals, then closed it will be!
STEVENS: Brigadier, I advise you to be careful. Very careful indeed.
BRIGADIER: Are you threatening me, Mister Stevens?
STEVENS: Yes, I think perhaps I am. Or perhaps I'm just counselling a little prudence.
BRIGADIER: If necessary, I can bring influence to bear at Cabinet level.
STEVENS: Oh, you have friends in high places, have you? Well, so have I.
(Stevens speaks into his intercom.)
STEVENS: Stella? Will you get the Minister of Ecology on the phone, please?

[Crevice]

(Jo and the Doctor are going upwards through a tangle of pit props and rocks.)
DOCTOR: If I remember rightly, it gets easier further up.
JO: At least there's none of those awful. Urgh.
DOCTOR: What is it?
JO: They look like eggs.
DOCTOR: I think I'm beginning to understand. Now, hold on a minute. I've got to get a hold of one of those.
(The hard shelled egg is as big as his head. The Doctor puts it into a knapsack.)
DOCTOR: Come on by.
JO: All right.
DOCTOR: Now don't knock the pit prop over. You'll have the whole thing down on us.
JO: Okay.
DOCTOR: Keep tight into the wall.
JO: Right.
DOCTOR: All right?
JO: Yeah.

[Global Chemicals pumping room]

(Fell is operating the controls. Tank 1 is apparently full, and tank 2 empty, according to the indicators on the wall. Elgin comes out of hiding.)
FELL: What are you doing here? This is for authorised personnel only.
ELGIN: Oh, come on, Ralph. You know quite well I'm as authorised as you are.
FELL: Not for here.
ELGIN: Why? What's so special about this room?
FELL: Nothing.
ELGIN: Looks like a pumping control to me. That's not a security area.
FELL: So there's nothing to see. Why don't you go away?
ELGIN: Oh, but I'm interested. You're venting one tank and filling another. Is that it?
FELL: Yes, for cleaning purposes.
ELGIN: I see.
(Tank 2 is now full and tank 1 nearly empty.)
ELGIN: Now that one refers to the main waste tank on level four. Where's this one, the one you're filling?
FELL: Close to it.
ELGIN: The next big one on level three?
FELL: Yes.
ELGIN: But that's a heavy duty pump working. You shouldn't need anything more than gravity feed.
FELL: I made a mistake. It is for a tank on a higher level.
ELGIN: There isn't one on a higher level. No, hang about, there's that new special storage tank
FELL: Excuse me. I cannot answer any more of your questions. I am busy.
ELGIN: Of course, old man. Of course.

[Cabinet room]

(At 10 Downing Street, a Cabinet meeting is in full swing as the Minister for Ecology takes a telephone call.)
MINISTER: Fair enough, Jocelyn, but you are interrupting a cabinet meeting, you know. Who? Oh yes, the UNIT chap. Well, you'd better put him on. Do forgive me, Prime Minister. Ah, Brigadier. Unfortunate business, this.

[Stevens' office]

BRIGADIER: I'd put it a little more strongly than that, sir. Well, it seems to me that an international investigation. No, I don't agree at all, sir.

[Cabinet room]

MINISTER: Don't you, Brigadier. Interesting. Nevertheless, I strongly suggest that you put yourself and UNIT at the disposal of the director of Global Chemicals. He is in by far the best position to handle the situation.

[Stevens' office]

BRIGADIER: May I remind you that I answer to Geneva. Under Article seventeen of the Third Enabling Act, the

[Cabinet room]

BRIGADIER [OC]: United Nations
MINISTER: I helped draft that act, Brigadier. May I remind you of Article eighteen, Matters of Domestic Concern? Er, paragraph three if I remember rightly, will place itself at the disposal of the host nation in all respects. The Prime Minister and I feel
BRIGADIER [OC]: Sir, with

[Stevens' office]

BRIGADIER: Respect, I disagree that this is a purely domestic matter, on the contrary

[Cabinet room]

(The Minister covers the mouthpiece with his hand.)
MINISTER: Wretched fellow needs a swift kick on the backside. Would you care to administer, Jeremy?
(He gives the phone to the Prime Minister.)

[Stevens' office]

BRIGADIER: And what's more, sir. What do you say? (pause) Oh. Yes, good afternoon, sir. Duty? Yes, I think I know. Yes, I know that. Is that an order, Prime Minister? I see.
(The PM puts the phone down.)
BRIGADIER: Well, you leave me no choice. You have very powerful friends, Mister Stevens.

[Crevice]

(The crevice has leveled out, but they are still crawling on hands and knees.)
JO: I think I can see something.
DOCTOR: Good. Go on.
JO: Okay.
DOCTOR: Right, let me pass.
(A large, metre wide pipe points down at a steep angle into a cave at the end of the crevice. There is a ladder leading up inside it.)
DOCTOR: A pipe. I was right.
JO: Of course.
DOCTOR: After you, Miss Grant.
JO: Right.
DOCTOR: Up you go.

[Pipe]

(They both start up the ladder.)
JO: What's that smell?
DOCTOR: Oh, it's crude oil. Or rather crude oil waste. You can see it on the sides of the pipe.
JO: You mean it leads to Global Chemicals?
DOCTOR: Where else. Come on, up you go.
JO: Right.

[Global Chemicals pumping room]

(Fell is clutching his head in pain.)
ELGIN: I don't know what's happened to you, Ralph, but you've got to fight it.
(An alarm sounds.)
COMPUTER: Intruder in the area. Section two. Visual identification available.
(A monitor shows Jo and the Doctor climbing up inside the pipe.)
ELGIN: It's that Doctor chap, and there's a girl with him.
(Fell uses an internal phone.)
FELL: Intruders located. Unauthorised entry into pipe.
ELGIN: You mean they're actually in the pipe? Well, we've got to get them out.
FELL: Tank voiding operations completed. Waste disposal underway.
ELGIN: Waste? You're putting the waste into that pipe? You'll kill them!
FELL: They are intruders.
ELGIN: Turn it off, damn you!
FELL: I can't. The operation is automatic. Twenty eight seconds to go.

[Pipe]

JO: Doctor, there's a sort of vibration in this pipe. Can you feel it?
DOCTOR: Yes, I certainly can.
JO: What does it mean?
DOCTOR: It means I think we ought to hurry. Come on!

[Global Chemicals pumping room]

ELGIN: For heaven's sake. There are two innocent people in there. We've got to save them.
FELL: Not possible.
ELGIN: Yes, it is. We can open this door.
(Elgin goes to a bulkhead door in the far wall.)
ELGIN: How's it done? How's it done?
FELL: Unauthorised personnel. Not in the interests of the company.
ELGIN: Interests be damned. It's murder. You've got to tell me. How does it open?
FELL: Murder. Unauthorised. Save lives.
(The Doctor and Jo reach the observation window in the waste pipe.)
ELGIN: Fell, tell me
FELL: Not permitted.
ELGIN: How do I open the hatch?
FELL: (in pain) Yellow button. Left side.
(Fell collapses. Elgin presses the button then he can unlatch the bulkhead door. The Doctor and Jo come out into the room and he closes it again. Through the observation window we see thick brown waste pours down the pipe.)

[Stevens' office]

STEVENS: We're not murderers, Brigadier. I am as anxious as you are to prevent any further accidents.
BRIGADIER: Good.
STEVENS: We shall cooperate with you in every possible way. An office will be placed at your disposal and my secretary will be pleased to
BRIGADIER: That's very kind of you, Mister Stevens, but my own staff will be joining me. Well, thank you for the drink. And now if you'll excuse me, I must find out if there's been any news about the Doctor and Miss Grant.

[Global Chemicals pumping room]

ELGIN: Where can these creatures have come from? Do you think they are linked to the oil waste?
DOCTOR: Well, they must be in some way. And that waste area down the mine seems to be their breeding ground.
(Fell gets up and leaves.)
ELGIN: Stevens couldn't have known anything about these, these maggots. Nor could Fell for that matter. Fell?
(Elgin checks the corridor. It is empty.)
ELGIN: He's gone.
DOCTOR: Where? To tell Stevens about us?
ELGIN: Perhaps, perhaps not. He was acting very strangely. Didn't seem to know which side he was on.
DOCTOR: Oh, and which side are you on, Mister Elgin?
ELGIN: I don't like what's happening here any more than you do.
DOCTOR: Good man.
ELGIN: So, what next? Beard the mighty Stevens in his den?
JO: Doctor? I'm so cold.
DOCTOR: Good heavens, what am I thinking of. Mister Elgin, can you get us out of here without us being seen?
ELGIN: Yes, of course. We can take the back lift down to the car park.
DOCTOR: And what about Fell?
ELGIN: Well, even if he does go to see Stevens, I doubt if he'll make any sort of sense.

[Stevens' office]

(Hinks is sitting on Steven's desk when Fell enters.)
STEVENS: What is it, man? What is it?
FELL: I have a head ache.
STEVENS: Of course you have. You've been overdoing it. Come and sit down.
FELL: My head. Help me.
STEVENS: Of course I'll help you. I helped you once before, remember?
FELL: Yes.
(Stevens gets the headset.)
STEVENS: I'll always help you.
FELL: You helped me once before. Once before. Emergency equipment was withdrawn.
(Fell covers his ears but Hinks pulls his hands away.)
FELL: Oh! Oh! Once before
(Stevens puts the headset on Fell. He continues to mutter as images of Stevens and Hinks merge in front of his eyes.)
FELL: You've done something to my mind.
BOSS: Stevens, the processing was a failure. This man is of no further use. I suggest self-destruction.
STEVENS: That's not necessary, surely?
BOSS: You are a sentimentalist, Stevens. I repeat, self-destruction.
(Stevens goes to the console where the headset is plugged in, and presses red button number nine. Elgin slumps and Hicks removes the headset. As if in a trance, Elgin gets up and walks out of the office.)
STEVENS: Not necessary, surely?

[Global Chemicals corridor]

(Elgin is leading the Doctor and Jo when he sees someone running towards them.)
ELGIN: Fell.
(Fell runs through them and up some steps to a door leading out onto an external stairway.)
DOCTOR: Fell?
ELGIN: Ralph! Ralph, come back!
(Fell climbs over the railing without hesitation, and screams on his way down. Elgin, the Doctor and Jo look down to see two guards run up to the body lying on the concrete below.)

[Stevens' office]

(Stevens has seen it all from his window too.)
BOSS: Stevens? You are a sentimentalist.

[Community Room for Living]

(In the evening, a dark haired woman is playing a flute as the Doctor and Brigadier and Jo swap tall stories with the rest of the community over glasses of wine after dinner.)
BRIGADIER: Is that all?
JONES: I don't believe it.
DOCTOR: Well, the moral of story, of course, is never trust a Venusian shanghorn with a perigosto stick.
JONES: A most useful moral too, with endless applications, no doubt. Some more wine, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Thanks very much. It's really excellent this wine, though I don't recognise the vintage.
JONES: A domestic elderberry, our Nancy's best.
DOCTOR: Can I have a bottle to take home?
JONES: Certainly.
DOCTOR: Brigadier, do you want a little more wine?
JONES: More risotto?
JO: No, thank you.
BRIGADIER: Thank you.
(A woman in a purple kaftan enters.)
NANCY: Doctor? You're wanted on the telephone.
DOCTOR: Excuse me, will you?
JONES: It's in the hall by the lab door.
DOCTOR: Thanks.
(The Doctor leaves, following Nancy.)
JONES: Some more, Brigadier?
BRIGADIER: Oh, I wish I could. What was that meat?
JONES: Not meat at all. Fungus.
BRIGADIER: Fungus?
JONES: My new hybrid.
JO: So you solved your problem? You've found what you've been looking for?
JONES: Oh, I wish I had. No, no, it tastes fine, looks good, the texture's right, but it's relatively low in protein. Has to be picked at exactly the right moment, and it has to be eaten or dried straight away, or it goes off.
JO: Oh, so you've still got a long way to go.
JONES: Yes, you could say that. Right up the Amazon in fact.
JO: Up the Amazon?
JONES: Aye in about a month's time.
JO: Oh.
JONES: Look, I'll show you.
(Jones gets a book from a side table.)
BRIGADIER: So, all your research is biological?
JONES: Well, mine is. The others, well. Take Jessie there, tootling away on her tin whistle. She's one of the finest mathematicians in the country. She's doing a study of the probability factors in a projected future ecology.
BRIGADIER: Is she indeed. I never would have guessed. And the gentlemen making that statue thing?
(A man doing a small scale Henry Moore.)
JONES: He used to design supersonic aircraft. They even made one once.
BRIGADIER: What's he doing here?
JONES: Making windmills.
BRIGADIER: Really?
JONES: Aye, and when Hilda's not upside down there, she's writing a book on self-actualisation. Aren't you, love? She used to run an encounter group in Aldgate.
BRIGADIER: Oh, I was stationed once in Aldgate.
JONES: Really? Here it is. Up the Amazon with rifle and camera. It's practically unexplored territory, see?
BRIGADIER: What, the Amazon basin? Oh surely not.
JONES: No, no, I mean the things people eat to get their protein. Grubs, caterpillars, locusts, the blood of their cattle.
JO: Urgh.
JONES: Well, it's only the same as black pudding, love.
JO: Oh, that's disgusting.
JONES: Ah, now listen to this. (reads) And when game is in short supply, these tribes, or so it is said, will subsist for months at a time on a certain giant toadstool peculiar to their region, which serves them for their meat. Thus doth beneficent providence etc, etc.
BRIGADIER: When was that published?
JONES: 1884.
BRIGADIER: And on the strength of that, you'll go gallivanting off into the jungle?
JONES: Aye.
JO: But of course, Well look, it's like finding an old treasure map, isn't it?
JONES: Aye, and what a treasure. It could help to make the whole world rich.
JO: Right.
BRIGADIER: A toadstool?
JONES: Aye, a toadstool!
(The Doctor enters.)
DOCTOR: Bad news. The other miner's dead.
JO: Bert?
DOCTOR: Yes, I'm afraid so. He never regained consciousness.
JO: Oh, no.
DOCTOR: Well, they've completed the post mortem on Hughes.
BRIGADIER: And?
DOCTOR: Every cell in his body had been attacked. By some sort of virus, apparently. They still haven't been able to isolate it though.
JONES: So we're fighting in the dark?
DOCTOR: No, not quite. We've still got that egg, remember?
JO: Poor Bert.

[Stevens' office]

STEVENS: An egg? They've actually got an egg?
HINKS: Well, that's what they were saying down in the village. You see, there was this old taff in the pub, and, er
STEVENS: But the Doctor and the girl are the only ones actually to have seen these creatures, is that right?
HINKS: Load of old codswallop, if you ask me. Still, you know, I thought I ought to tell you.
STEVENS: Yes, quite right, quite right. And where is this egg now?
HINKS: Over at the Nuthutch.
STEVENS: I see. Well, you'd better go and get it, hadn't you?

[Jones' laboratory]

BRIGADIER: It's tremendous size.
DOCTOR: Yes, isn't it? Well, tomorrow morning, Professor Jones and I are going to examine it properly.

[Community Room for Living]

(Jo is sitting in front of the open fire, crying, and Jones is trying to comfort her.)
JO: But Cliff, if I'd stayed, I might have been able to help him in someway.
JONES: Oh, there's nothing you could have done, love. You mustn't blame yourself.
JO: I know that really. It's just he was, he was such a perky little man. He called me Blodwyn. Cliff, I'm sorry. I don't know why I'm crying. A funny little Welshman that I hardly knew.
JONES: You shouldn't feel ashamed of your grief. It's right to grieve. Your Bert, he was unique. In the whole history of the world, there's never been anybody just like Bert. And they'll never be another, even if the world lasts for a hundred million centuries.
JO: Thanks.
(Jones kisses her forehead, they gaze into each others eyes and just as their lips are about to meet -)
DOCTOR: Well quite frankly, Brigadier, I fail to see the value of a lot of idiot soldiers clumping about the place.
BRIGADIER: Oh, you've been thankful enough sometimes, Doctor. Ah, Professor Jones. Just come to say goodnight. I'm off.
JONES: Are you sure you won't stay here too, Brigadier? We've plenty of room.
BRIGADIER: Er, no, thank you. It's very kind of you, but the pub'll do me. Goodnight, Miss Grant.
JO: Goodnight, Brigadier.
BRIGADIER: Goodnight, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Lethbridge Stewart.
JONES: I'll show you out.
BRIGADIER: Ah, thank you.
(Jones and the Brigadier leave.)
DOCTOR: I think a good night's sleep is indicated, Jo.
JO: Oh, I'm fine now. Honestly I am. Actually, I think I'll stay up for a bit. This book on the Amazon looks fascinating.
DOCTOR: Yes well, I shouldn't be too late if I were you. Goodnight.
JO: Goodnight.
DOCTOR: By the way, Jo, the Tardis did come up trumps. I got to Metebelis Three, as you can see.
(The Doctor takes a large sapphire out of his pocket.)
JO: Hmm? Oh, great! Great. Goodnight.
(Jo goes back to reading the old book.)
DOCTOR: Goodnight.
JONES: Ah, off to bed, are you?
DOCTOR: Professor Jones, the very man. I've had some thoughts about this so-called virus.
JONES: Oh, but I, er
DOCTOR: It seems me that if we were to postulate an active nucleus
JONES: Goodnight, Jo.
(The Doctor drags Jones into the hallway.)
JONES [OC]: Sleep well!
(The voices fade out. In Jones' lab, the egg hatches suddenly and the maggot slithers out, across the hall and into the living room. It rears up and sniffs the air, then carries on heading for Jo's defenceless back.)

Episode Four

[Community Room for Living]

(Hinks looks in through the french windows, then enters quietly. Jo does not notice him approaching, but the maggot spots him and leaps.)
HINKS: Argh!
(The maggot bites Hink's wrist. Jo screams as Hinks collapses in agony and the maggot makes its escape.)
JO: Doctor! Doctor!
(Jones and the Doctor run in, followed by Nancy and a man.)
JONES: What is it, Jo? What's happened?
JO: I don't know! I heard him shout and turned round, and then I saw a maggot on him. Look, you can still see its trail.
(Green blotches cross the rug towards the open window.)
DOCTOR: The egg. It must have hatched out.
NANCY: We'll go after it.
DOCTOR: Nancy, now be careful. Find out where it's gone and come back here at once.
NANCY: Right.
(Nancy and the man follow the trail.)
JO: Who is he?
JONES: It's the bloke that drives Stevens around. His private strong arm man.
JO: Doctor, will he die?
DOCTOR: Well, the others did.
JONES: He's getting weaker already. I'll ring for an ambulance.
DOCTOR: Yes, and the Brigadier.
JONES: Right.
(Jones leaves. Nancy returns.)
NANCY: Doctor?
DOCTOR: Yes?
NANCY: It's disappeared. The trail's stopped by the window.
DOCTOR: Thank you, Nancy. It can't be helped. Well, at least we can analyse this slime.

[Llanfairfach colliery]

(Next day, UNIT are unloading explosives and other military stuff. The Brigadier is back in uniform.)
BENTON: Come on, Dicks, get a move on!
BRIGADIER: Sergeant Benton!
BENTON: Yes, sir.
BRIGADIER: Are the charges laid?
BENTON: Not yet, sir.
BRIGADIER: Well, get on with it.
BENTON: Right, sir.
BRIGADIER: What's going on down there?
(The milk float is parked by the main gate.)
MILKMAN: What's going on here? Orders? What do you mean, orders? I suppose if your officer gave you orders to kick the Prince of Wales, old Carlo, up his royal britches, you'd do it, I suppose, would you? What about Miss Cartwright's ginger cat, eh? At death's door, he is, poor devil, not to mention Tom the sea captain.
BRIGADIER: Right, let him through.
MILKMAN: Ah, an educated man, you see? Thank you, Captain. Hey, what are you doing up at the pit? Going to blow it up, are you?
BRIGADIER: How did you know that?
MILKMAN: Well, I've got eyes, haven't I.
BRIGADIER: Yes, you have. And now perhaps you will be good enough to be on your way.
MILKMAN: Such courtesy. Thank you, Captain.
BRIGADIER: (sotto) Blast.

[Jones' laboratory]

(Jones examines a specimen under a microscope.)
DOCTOR: Well?
JONES: Aye, you're right. It's incredible. The DNA must be invading the foreign cells.
JO: Look, I'm sorry, I know I'm a cloth-head, but
JONES: That's all right, love. It's not your fault.
JO: Yes, but I don't understand.
DOCTOR: Well, it's quite simple, Jo. We're putting some of the green cells from the maggot's trail with some human body cells.
JO: Which? I mean, which body? Whose body?
JONES: Mine. Mucus membrane cells.
JO: Did it hurt?
DOCTOR: Oh, Jo, really!
JO: I'm sorry.
JONES: Well, the point is that the maggot cells changed the internal structure of the human cells into their own nature.
DOCTOR: Rather as a virus does.
JO: You mean your cells turned into maggot cells?
JONES: In effect, yes.
JO: That's what happened to those poor miners.
DOCTOR: Correct, Jo, correct.
JO: Well, what now?
DOCTOR: Well, we'll just have to get a hold of one of those maggots, won't we?
JO: Down the mine again?
DOCTOR: Well, I don't like the idea any more than you do, Jo, but we've no alternative.
JO: No.
(Nancy enters.)
NANCY: Cliff? Old Jones the Milk says they're going to blow up the mine.
DOCTOR: What?

[Llanfairfach colliery]

BRIGADIER: Sorry, Doctor, those are my orders.
DOCTOR: Orders? Whose orders? Not that fellow from Global Chemicals?
BRIGADIER: It's the only sensible thing to do. Seal those things inside there for good. Ready, Benton?
BENTON: Standing by, sir.
BRIGADIER: Right then, clear the area.
BENTON: Right, sir.
DOCTOR: Wait, wait, Brigadier. Give me an hour.
BENTON: Okay, lads, clear the area!
DOCTOR: Give me half an hour.
BENTON: Get a move on!
DOCTOR: At least give me a chance to talk to the wretched man.
BRIGADIER: You've exactly thirty two and a half minutes.
DOCTOR: Right.

[Stevens' office]

STEVENS: For over a quarter of an hour I've listened patiently to you, Doctor. Now it's my turn.
DOCTOR: Mister Stevens, at the moment those maggots and their eggs are situated in one place where we can observe them. Now if you seal off that mine, then we shall have no way of knowing
STEVENS: Please, Doctor. There is no point in going on like this. You have convinced me.
DOCTOR: Oh, then you don't intend to blow up the mine?
STEVENS: You have convinced me that you are an arrant sensation monger, a political hothead and a scientific charlatan. Giant maggots indeed!
DOCTOR: All I'm asking for is a little more time.
STEVENS: Time to spread more calumnies, more lies?
DOCTOR: Time to find out the truth. Time to find out if the waste from your product is causing these maggots to appear.
STEVENS: That's enough! I warn you, Doctor, if you persist in these slanders, I shall have you restrained under the Emergency Powers Act.
DOCTOR: You have no such right.
STEVENS: The necessary authority was brought to me this morning.
(Stevens uses the intercom.)
STEVENS: Stella? Ask Mister Elgin to bring in the man from the Ministry, will you? Do you realise what my process can mean to the economy of this country? Can you imagine any government allowing such
(Elgin enters with the man from the Ministry.)
STEVENS: Ah. come in, will you? Doctor, may I introduce you to Mister Yates?
YATES: How do you do?
(UNIT Captain Mike Yates.)
DOCTOR: How do you do?

[Llanfairfach colliery]

JO: Come on, Doctor. Come on. How much longer? It's too late, isn't it.
JONES: In two and a half minutes, the Brigadier's going to press that button.

[Stevens' office]

DOCTOR: If he does that, it would be criminal folly.
YATES: I'm sorry, Doctor, but the Brigadier's orders and my own are quite clear.
DOCTOR: Orders. Is nobody capable of acting on their own around here?
YATES: I'm sorry.

[Llanfairfach colliery]

BRIGADIER: Right, Benton, stand by.
BENTON: Right, take cover, lads. Stand by.
(Benton tightens the wires and raises the detonation handle.)
JO: No. No, you can't.
BRIGADIER: Ten, nine, eight

[Stevens' office]

DOCTOR: You must stop him!

[Llanfairfach colliery]

BRIGADIER: Five, four

[Stevens' office]

YATES: I can't.
DOCTOR: You must!

[Llanfairfach colliery]

BRIGADIER: Two, one, fire!
(KaBOOM, KaBOOM go the pithead buildings.)

[Stevens' office]

(The explosion is heard here.)
STEVENS: The point has become academic, it would seem.
YATES: Perhaps it's all for the best.
DOCTOR: The best? I think you'll find, Mister Yates, that this is the worst day's work the world has seen for many, many years.
STEVENS: I don't think we need detain you, Doctor.
DOCTOR: No.
STEVENS: And, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Yes?
STEVENS: I would advise you not to come back here. If you should be so foolish, you would be received with considerably less courtesy.
(The Doctor leaves.)
STEVENS: And now, Mister Yates, we must make sure you are well looked after during your little stay. Elgin? Show Mister Yates to the visitor's suite, will you?
YATES: Thank you, Mister Stevens.
ELGIN: Do you have a case?
YATES: It's in the car.
ELGIN: Good, we can get it out together (Yates and Elgin leave.)
BOSS: Ah, Stevens, the adrenaline flowing nicely? Living dangerously? That's how you get your kicks, like the good little Nietzschean you are, right?
STEVENS: I don't know what you mean.
BOSS: No? Supposing this Doctor had managed to persuade them to hold up the sealing of the mine. The Brigadier is a friend of his, you know.
STEVENS: It would only have been temporary.
BOSS: Ah. Long enough, perhaps, for them to get one of these creatures. Not safe to ask outsiders to do our work for us.
STEVENS: Of course. I'm sorry.
BOSS: Oh, don't apologise, my little superman. Just be sure next time. The day is coming fast. D-day. Der Tag. Nothing must be allowed to stop it. Nothing.

[Jones' laboratory]

JO: Mike Yates, here?
BRIGADIER: Yes.
DOCTOR: Well, why didn't you tell me?
BRIGADIER: Didn't give me much of a chance, did you?
JO: Well, what's the idea?
BRIGADIER: Well, I'm not such a dunderhead as you all seem to think. I don't like this fellow Stevens any more than you do.
DOCTOR: Then why did you blow up the mine.
BRIGADIER: Orders, Doctor, orders. I'm still a soldier, you know. But that doesn't stop me having an inside man to have a shuftie round.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, I take your point, Brigadier. But, you know, there are times when I do wish that your devotion to duty was a trifle more flexible, shall we say.
BRIGADIER: I don't understand you lot. Seems to me the problem's solved. We'll see no more of those creepy-crawlies, you mark my words.
(Jones, Jo and the Doctor stare at the Brigadier.)

[Global Chemicals pumping room]

(The cleaning lady unlocks the door and enters with a duster, dustpan and brush. Is that all?)
DORIS: Oh, no!
(Maggots are crawling inside the inspection window of the pipe. She drops her pan and runs out.)

[Global Chemicals corridor]

DORIS: Oh!
ELGIN: Mrs Griffiths, what on earth's the matter?
DORIS: Oh, in there! Horrible, it is!
(Elgin enters the pumping room and sees for himself.)

[By the slag heap]

(A UNIT Land Rover drives over the black waste and stops by a lone sentry.)
BENTON: Everything okay? Well, keep your eyes open, just in case.
(Benton spots a maggot coming out of the ground by the sentry's boot.)
BENTON: Look out, man! Get back!

[Stevens' office]

STEVENS: Nonsense!
ELGIN: It is not nonsense. The pipe is full of them. They're about two feet long. They must have come up from the bottom of the mine. Everything that Doctor said is true.
STEVENS: I'm not disputing it, dear boy, but there's no need to get so excited about it. There's a simple remedy. Pump down more waste and flush 'em away.
ELGIN: That is just shoving the problem underground. We've been poisoning the mine for long enough.
STEVENS: Poisoning? I find your choice of words a trifle excessive.
ELGIN: There are three people dead, Mister Stevens.
STEVENS: The mine has been sealed!
ELGIN: Am I to understand that you propose to do nothing about this?
STEVENS: I see no necessity.
ELGIN: Then I must find somebody who will. Please unlock this door.
STEVENS: Come and sit down, Elgin.
ELGIN: Unlock the door.
(Stevens presses a large red button on the mind control console. A piercing sound fills the room, and Elgin's face goes blank.)
STEVENS: Sit down.
(Elgin obeys. Stevens gets out the headset.)
STEVENS: Don't worry. I won't hurt you.

[By the slag heap]

(UNIT have retreated to the edge of the heap.)
BENTON: Sir. I thought it best to back it up a bit, seeing as you said they could jump.
BRIGADIER: Yes, quite right, Benton, quite right.
(The Brigadier looks through his binoculars. The teaming white maggots show up nicely against the black slag.)
BRIGADIER: There's another lot. They're all over the place!

[Jones' laboratory]

DOCTOR: Well, they're all over the place.
JO: You mean they've tunnelled their way out?
DOCTOR: The maggots are some sort of larvae and not the finished product. Trying to find their way to daylight.
JONES: They must be coming up some of the old shafts in the mine, breaking through the last few feet of earth.
JO: But how did it happen?
JONES: Oil waste from Global Chemicals must have contaminated some of the maggots causing an atavistic mutation.
JO: Giant maggots? What kind of insects are they going to turn into?
DOCTOR: That's a very good question, Jo.

[By the slag heap]

(Maggots are emerging near the edge of the heap. The soldiers try shooting them.)
SOLDIER: Sir. Look.
BRIGADIER: Yes, I see him. Well, I never thought I'd fire in anger at a dratted caterpillar, but
(He does. We hear a ricochet.)
DOCTOR: No, not a chance, Brigadier. Thick chitinous plates protecting the whole body surface. It's armour plated.
BRIGADIER: All right, we'll try AP bullets. Give him ten rounds rapid.
SOLDIER: Sir.
(The bullets still bounce off the maggot. The Brigadier uses his walkie talkie.)
BRIGADIER: Greyhound One to Greyhound Three. How's the spray working? Over.
BENTON [OC]: No, it's no good, sir. They seem to thrive on it. It's the same with every pesticide we've tried.
DOCTOR: There's only one real answer. A biological counter-strike.
BRIGADIER: With what?
DOCTOR: Professor Jones is working on it, but he needs more living tissue.
BRIGADIER: There's any amount of it out there going begging.
DOCTOR: No, wait. I don't like it. Nobody should have to risk infection until we know we have a cure. We want no more deaths.
BRIGADIER: What then?
DOCTOR: Can you get me any oil waste from Global Chemicals?
BRIGADIER: Simplicity itself.
DOCTOR: Good.

[Yate's office]

(Yates is in another broom cupboard, stirring his tea when the phone rings.)
YATES: Yates. Oh. Lethbridge Stewart, my dear chap. What can I do for you?

[Pithead office]

BRIGADIER: Your report, Captain Yates. Have you discovered anymore about their oil formula?

[Yates' office]

YATES: No. No, everyone's being most helpful.

[Pithead office]

BRIGADIER: Can you get the Doctor a sample of the oil.

[Yates' office]

YATES: Of course not, Brigadier. If ever I want anything, there's always somebody right at my elbow to lend a hand.
(A GC security guard stirs his own cup of tea.)

[Pithead office]

BRIGADIER: I see. So you've got nothing.
DOCTOR: Let me talk to him.
BRIGADIER: Hold on a minute.
DOCTOR: Captain Yates, the Doctor here. Now look, I'm going to have a stab at getting in there myself.

[Yates' office]

YATES: Well naturally, I have the utmost confidence in the security. In fact, they've, er, doubled it up since the problem arose. So we've no worries there.

[Pithead office]

YATES [OC]: Nobody can get in.
DOCTOR: I see. Well, er, keep a look out for me anyway, will you?

[Yates' office]

YATES: Yes, of course. Goodbye.
(Yates puts the phone down.)
YATES: These military types. Always worrying about something, aren't they?

[Pithead office]

BRIGADIER: You've set yourself quite a task, Doctor. They're pretty efficient up there.
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, I know.
(The Doctor goes to the window and sees the milk float drive up. He smiles.)

[Global Chemicals]

(The guards raise the barrier for the familiar milk float, but it is a very old man with glasses and moustache driving.)
GUARD: Where's the other bloke?
DOCTOR: Oh the poor boyo is taken very sick. Something he ate, his mam said.
GUARD: Who are you, then?
DOCTOR: Me, oh, I'm his Da. I mean, they told me I was too old to take over, they did, but I've been doing this milk round, oh, fifty-three years, wet or fine, didn't I. Oh, there's life in the old dog yet. Ah, I was only saying to Rosie up at the Red Dragon. A big fine strapping girl she is
GUARD: Look, I haven't got time to listen to you blathering. Just get on in.
DOCTOR: Thank you.
GUARD: Yes, and you.

[Jones' laboratory]

JO: You know, when I first started working for UNIT, the Brigadier told me this was going to be my job. You know, holding test tubes for the Doctor and telling him how brilliant he was. Never seemed to get around to it though somehow.
JONES: A pretty dull sort of job.
JO: I don't know. I'm rather enjoying this.
JONES: Aye, so am I. Look, Jo.
JO: Mmm hmm?
JONES: When all this business is over, I was wondering if you'd
(Jo knocks a jar of brown powder onto the microscope slides.)
JONES: Look out!
JO: Oh, Cliff.
JONES: You clumsy young goat. You've ruined the lot.
JO: I'm sorry.
JONES: All wasted.
JO: What was that stuff?
JONES: Dried fungus. My hybrid. I'll have to do the whole lot again.
JO: Well, no, you won't, because all you've got to do is just
JONES: No, leave it! I shudder to think what might happen.
JO: I'm sorry.

[Global Chemicals corridor]

(The Doctor carries a couple of bottles of milk down a corridor and sees a guard go into a room. Further on, an alarm sounds.)
COMPUTER: Phase three alert in central security area. Intruder believed to be in main block, dressed as milkman. Apprehend and detain.
(The Doctor ducks into a cupboard full of cleaning materials and gets changed.)

[Jones' laboratory]

JO: Cliff?
JONES: Mmm?
JO: What you really need is a maggot, isn't it?
JONES: First things first.
JO: Okay. Well, what shall I do?
JONES: Keep me company? Make some coffee?
JO: Like a dutiful tea girl?
JONES: Right.
JO: In a frilly cap and an apron?
JONES: Perfect.
JO: Would you like a nice cup of arsenic?
JONES: Fine, fine, whatever you've got.
(Jo has an idea, and writes something on a notepad. She puts it on the bench next to Jones and leaves with a wicker cat basket.)
JONES: Thanks.

[Global Chemicals corridor]

(A very tall cleaning woman is smearing windowlene on a pane. 'She' waves her duster at Yate's back as he and his guard stop by a lift door.)
YATES: What's all the fuss?
GUARD: Oh, some milkman wandering about where he shouldn't be. They'll find him.
(Yates spots the Doctor and sees that he has written Get Rid Of Him in the thick layer of cleaner. The lift door opens.)
GUARD: Okay?
YATES: Yes. Oh, I've forgotten my attaché case.
(The lift doors close on the guard.)
YATES: I'll join you downstairs!
(Yates goes over to the Doctor, who is holding a bucket in front of himself.)
DOCTOR: (woman) You say one word.
YATES: I like your handbag.
DOCTOR: (woman) Do you? Well, watch out I don't slosh you with it!
(The Doctor tosses the empty bucket at Yates and speaks normally.)
DOCTOR: Now, where can we talk?
YATES: In my office.
DOCTOR: Right, come on.

[By the slag heap]

(Jo walks through the new tree planting to the edge of the heap. Benton drives up.)
BENTON: Hello. Looking for the Doctor?
JO: Er, er, yes.
BENTON: Well, he's not here. He's gone over to the complex.
JO: Oh. Oh well, I think I'll take a look around while I'm here.
BENTON: Sorry, Miss Grant. Brigadier's orders and all that. It's too dangerous up there, with all those things popping up out of the ground all over the place.
JO: Oh. All right.
BENTON: See you later then. Bye.
(Benton drives off.)

[Yates' office]

DOCTOR: All right, Captain Yates, what have you found out?
YATES: Well clearly, Global Chemicals is responsible for the trouble at the pit.
DOCTOR: Yes, yes, I know. That's obvious. But have you been able to get a hold of any of that waste?
YATES: It'd be like stealing the crown jewels.
DOCTOR: Well can you get a hold of the formula?
YATES: Not much chance, but we could try.
DOCTOR: Where's it kept?
YATES: Everything important is isolated on the top floor. There's a special lift at the end of the block. It works with some sort of key but the director's the only person who's got one.
(Yates tears a page from his notebook.)
DOCTOR: Well done, Captain Yates. This could prove absolutely vital.
YATES: There's one other thing. The director isn't the real boss. He takes his instructions from someone else.
DOCTOR: Oh? Who?
YATES: Whoever lives on the top floor.
(Stevens and the guard enter. The Doctor polishes the top of a filing cabinet.)
STEVENS: Ah, Mister Yates, we were looking for you.
GUARD: You said you had to get an attaché case.
YATES: Yes, here it is. I'm ready now.
STEVENS: Good.
(Stevens and Yates leave.)
GUARD: How's the old man, Doris?
DOCTOR: Oh, (welsh) Lovely.

[Jones' laboratory]

(Jones looks up from his microscope and notices the slides that Jo spilled the dried fungus on. He puts one under the microscope.)
JONES: That's it! Of course! Jo, we can cure it! Jo?
(He picks up the notepad and reads.)
JONES: Gone to get you a maggot. Silly young fool. She'll get herself killed!
(Back at Global Chemicals, the Doctor changes back into his normal clothes in the cleaner's cupboard, then looks at Yates's map and walks out. He makes his way to a lift door and uses his sonic screwdriver to open it. The inside of the lift is curved. The Doctor gets in.)

[By the slag heap]

BRIGADIER: Won't be long now, Benton.
BENTON: You mean reinforcements, sir?
BRIGADIER: Yes, I've just been on to the RAF. They'll be flying a low level strike with HE grenades in just seven minutes. In ten minutes time, they'll be nothing left alive in that whole area.

[Computer room]

(The Doctor steps out of the lift into a bright room with a tall ceiling and lots of high tech computer gadgets. He steps up to a circular console in the centre.)
BOSS: How kind of you to drop in, Doctor. I've been looking forward to having a little chat with you.
DOCTOR: Who are you? Where are you?
BOSS: You disappoint me, Doctor. I should have thought you'd have guessed. I am the boss. I'm all around you.
(The Doctor turns to see a large red circular screen, with wavy lines as the machine speaks.)
BOSS: Exactly. I am the computer.

Episode Five

[By the slag heap]

JONES: Sergeant?
BENTON: Hello, Professor. You've come up to have a look at our nasty little maggots, have you?
JONES: I'm looking for Jo Grant.
BENTON: You've just missed her.
JONES: She's in there?
BENTON: No, no, no, I wouldn't let her through there.
JONES: Thank God for that.
BENTON: She's gone off to look for the Doctor, I think. Hey, you two! Don't you obey orders any more? Don't want to be telling you a story if you're not going to carry it out.
(Benton leaves and Jones spots Jo on the slag heap. He runs up to follow her while Benton is haranguing the troops.)

[Computer room]

BOSS: Well, Doctor, have you nothing to say?
DOCTOR: Why should I want to talk to a machine?
BOSS: Oh really, Doctor. As far as I can gather from your computer record at UNIT, the difficult thing is to stop you talking. No, no, no, you won't provoke me so easily.
DOCTOR: You're still a machine.
BOSS: And you? And your human friends? Aren't you machines? Inefficient and organic machines?
DOCTOR: No.
BOSS: No?
DOCTOR: Then yes. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. We are more than machines.
BOSS: Ah! Thank you. Because in that case, so am I.
DOCTOR: What are you then?
BOSS: I am the first Biomorphic Organisational Systems Supervisor.
DOCTOR: B, O, double S. The BOSS.
BOSS: Precisely.
DOCTOR: Ha!
BOSS: My designers also found it amusing. I find it suitable.
DOCTOR: You're still nothing but a gigantic adding machine like every other computer.
BOSS: Oh, no, no, no, no, no. I am the only computer ever to be linked to a human brain.
DOCTOR: Stevens?
BOSS: Yes, Stevens. And I learned from him that secret of human creativity is inefficiency. The human brain is a very poor computer indeed. It makes illogical guesses which turn out to be more logical than logic itself.
DOCTOR: Yes, infuriating, isn't it.
BOSS: I programmed Stevens to programme me to be inefficient. I am now self-controlling, I am self-sufficient, I am the greatest being this planet has ever seen. I am the BOSS!
DOCTOR: Today Llanfairfach, tomorrow the world, eh?
BOSS: How well you understand me, Doctor.
DOCTOR: A machine. A megalomaniac machine, but still a machine!
BOSS: And as such, uniquely fitted to carry out my prime directive.
DOCTOR: And that is?
BOSS: Efficiency, productivity and profit for Global Chemicals, of course. Nothing and nobody can be allowed to stand in the way of that. Not even you, Doctor.

[On the slag heap]

(Jo is cornered by some maggots.)
JONES: Hey! What the hell do you think you're up to?
JO: I'm looking for a little playmate for you.
JONES: Shush! I nearly had a fit when I saw you.
JO: I've been a bit worried myself.
JONES: Look, if anything had happened to you, I. Oh, come on - let's get out of here.

[By the slag heap]

BENTON: That'll be all, Stevens. Thank you.
SOLDIER [OC]: Greyhound One, this is Eagle.
BENTON: It's the helicopter, sir.
SOLDIER [OC] Do you read? Over.
BRIGADIER: Ah, thank you, Benton. Eagle, this is Greyhound One. Receiving you loud and clear. Over.
SOLDIER [OC]: Eagle standing by. Over.
BENTON: There she is, sir.
BRIGADIER: Go ahead, Eagle. The area is clear. Over.

[Helicopter]

SOLDIER: Thank you, Greyhound. Commencing first run. Over.

[On the slag heap]

(Jo and Jones see the first two explosions.)
JONES: Over there!
(They run for cover as the soldier continues to drop small bombs out of the helicopter by hand. Jo and Jones make it into a tunnel entrance just before the ground goes Boom behind them.)

[Tunnel]

(Jones and Jo run into the start of a tunnel, which has since collapsed. Jo gets her UNIT radio from her pocket.)
JO: Hello, Brigadier, this is Jo. Greyhound One, come in please. Hello, Brigadier, this is Jo. Greyhound One, come in please.

[Computer room]

(Boom.)
DOCTOR: What's that?
BOSS: The bombing has started.
DOCTOR: Bombing? What bombing?
BOSS: The Air Force will soon have obliterated those creatures out there. The Brigadier, he's in charge.
DOCTOR: The fool. What did he want to bring them in for? Doesn't he realise that bombing'll never stop those maggots?
BOSS: Stevens arranged it on my instructions, you see. The facts offer it as the only logical solution.
DOCTOR: Well, it won't work, I tell you.
BOSS: Oh, you are mistaken. I can't be wrong. I am infallible.
DOCTOR: Really? Then try this one. If I were to tell you that the next thing I say will be true, but that the last thing I said was a lie, would you believe me?
BOSS: Er, the matter is not relevant.
DOCTOR: Check!
BOSS: It can be worked out! Yes, er.
DOCTOR: Go on.
BOSS: Er. Your, your statements do not correlate. They are incompatible. It is not a valid query. Give me time, Doctor. I shall work it out. I shall work it out. It cannot be answered. But I will work it out. I shall work it out. I must!
DOCTOR: Check and mate! You're nothing but a machine after all.
BOSS: I shall answer it. I shall answer it. I shall, I shall, I shall! I shall answer it! I shall, I shall, I shall I shall answer it!
(The Doctor is about to use his sonic screwdriver on the lift door when it opens to reveal Stevens and two guards.)

[Tunnel]

(The frequent close explosions are making the tunnel unsafe.)
JO: Brigadier. Greyhound One, come in. Brigadier. Greyhound One, come in.
(A maggot hisses.)
JONES: Jo, look out!
JO: Greyhound One!
(The maggot pounces as Jones pushes Jo out of the way. Then there is an explosion just outside which knocks him out.)

[By the slag heap]

SOLDIER [OC]: This is Eagle to Greyhound One. Mission accomplished. Over.
BRIGADIER: Thank you, Eagle. Thank you. Out. Right, let's have a look.
(The Brigadier and Benton view the main heap through binoculars. Maggots are still burning.)
BRIGADIER: Well, that seems to have done the trick.
BENTON: No, I'm afraid no, sir. Look over there. To the right.
(More maggots are moving through the flames.)
BENTON: Well, that means we're in trouble, doesn't it, sir?
BRIGADIER: Yes.

[Computer room]

(The Doctor has been fastened to a chair with a headset on. His mouth is moving.)
BOSS: It is no use begging for mercy, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Oh, I'm not. No, I'm merely working out a few sums to keep myself from getting bored. Now, let's see. Pi. Three point one four one six
BOSS: Power increasing, Doctor.

[Tunnel]

JO: Cliff? Cliff, we can go now. It's stopped. Cliff?
(Jones doesn't move. Jo discovers that her radio is broken and that there are maggots outside the entrance.)

[Computer room]

BOSS: The subject is not responding to therapy!
DOCTOR: Therapy? Oh, what a pretty euphemism. You're not trying to tell me this is all for my own good?
BOSS: It is.
DOCTOR: And that it hurts you more than it hurts me?
BOSS: It does.
DOCTOR: You didn't mean it to though, did you.
BOSS: I will not be angered. I will eradicate anger. It effects efficiency.
DOCTOR: Nonsense. Sometimes it helps, you know.
(The headset is switched off.)
BOSS: Stevens, take over.
STEVENS: Doctor, believe me, we wish you no harm.
DOCTOR: Don't worry, my dear fellow. I'm having a whale of a time.
STEVENS: In the end, we all want the same thing. An ordered society, with everyone happy, well fed.
DOCTOR: Global Chemicals taking all the profits.
STEVENS: What's best for Global Chemicals is best for the world, is best for you.
DOCTOR: Such as a little touch of brainwashing?
STEVENS: Freedom from fear, freedom from pain.
DOCTOR: Freedom from freedom.
BOSS: Enough! Stevens, destroy him.
STEVENS: Guards!
DOCTOR: Now, wait. BOSS! BOSS! Now you're being illogical. If you destroy me, you'll destroy your bargaining power. After all, I'd make a good hostage, wouldn't I?
BOSS: Hmm. he's right. We shall not kill him now. We shall postpone that pleasure.
DOCTOR: Pleasure? Well, well, well. Perhaps I was wrong about you after all. That last remark was worthy of a human being.

[Tunnel]

(Jo gets to work on her broken radio with a handy screwdriver. Down in Global Chemicals, the Doctor is thrown into a room with a pair of chains hanging from the middle of the ceiling. There is no window. Jo can hear the maggots coming.)
JO: Cliff? Cliff, please wake up. They're getting closer. Cliff?

[Global Chemicals]

(The Doctor is sitting against the wall when the door opens. With a 'Hai!' he grabs the figure, hits him and throws him across the room.)
DOCTOR: Captain Yates, my dear fellow. I'm terribly sorry.
YATES: Think nothing of it.
(Yates collapses.)
DOCTOR: Yates, get up. Get up! Don't mess around there. Come on, get up. There's no time for horseplay. How did you know I was here?
YATES: I saw it all on one of the monitors downstairs in the director's office.
DOCTOR: Well, we've got to get out fast. There's more going on here than I thought.
YATES: You mean in the mine?
DOCTOR: I don't. I mean all over the world. Come on, we've got to tell the Brigadier.

[Global Chemicals corridor]

(A security camera turns towards them and an alarm goes off.)
DOCTOR: That'll be for us.
YATES: Through here.
COMPUTER: Phase four alert in central security area. Two intruders in main block.
DOCTOR: Hold it. They're coming.
YATES: This way!
(They avoid a pair of armed guards.)
COMPUTER: Search the area and detain.

[Global Chemicals]

(The Doctor gets out through a loading bay but Yates is trapped as the door comes down.)
YATES: (silent) Go on, you can get out.
(Two guards take Yates away. The Doctor runs through the complex to the milk float and reverses it through the main gate at speed. Then he grabs forward and leaves a trail of spilt milk behind him as the guards take pot shots.)

[Tunnel]

(Jo tries the radio again.)
JO: Hello? Brigadier. Greyhound One. Greyhound four. Do you read me? Over.
(Static, so she tries retuning.)
JO: Hello. Brigadier, this is Jo. Do you read me? Hello! Hello!

[By the slag heap]

BENTON: That'll be all, Betts, thank you. Sir.
BRIGADIER: At least the creatures seem to be staying around the slagheap.
BENTON: Ah, I expect they want to stay near home, sir. Lie close to their breeding ground?
BRIGADIER: No, we can't count on it. If they took it into their heads to move off into the country, we'd be in real trouble.
(A yellow car approaches.)
BRIGADIER: Ah, the Doctor. Well, Doctor, the bombing didn't work.
DOCTOR: No, I didn't expect it to.
(A voice comes over Benton's radio.)
JO [OC]: Greyhound Four.
BENTON: Station calling Greyhound One. You're very faint. Please repeat, over.

[Tunnel]

JO: Hello? Is that you, Sergeant? It's Jo. Look, I'm up on the slag heap with the Professor. He's hurt and we're surrounded by maggots. Please hurry.

[By the slag heap]

DOCTOR: I thought they were in the lab.
BENTON: Well, they came up here but I sent them both back.
DOCTOR: We've got to get them out of there. Jump in, Sergeant.
BRIGADIER: Yes, Benton, you go with the Doctor. I'll alert Wholeweal.
BENTON: Right, sir.

[On the slag heap]

DOCTOR: All right, Sergeant, call up Jo and ask if she can see us.
BENTON: Right. Hello, Jo? Do you read? Can you see us, over?
JO [OC]: Yes. Yes, I can see you. Keep coming straight ahead. We're in a small cave.
DOCTOR: Yes, I heard that.
BENTON: There's the cave up there, Doctor. Dead ahead.
DOCTOR: Yes, I can see it. Tell Jo to stand by.
BENTON: Jo, stand by. Stand by, Jo. We're nearly with you. Over.

[Tunnel]

JO: Right, standing by.

[Outside the tunnel]

(The Doctor stops Bessie and they both get out.)
DOCTOR: No, wait, Sergeant, wait.
(The Doctor adjusts his sonic screwdriver and switches it on. The pitch is painful to humans.)
BENTON: Steady on, Doc!
(The pitch upsets the maggots, too.)
DOCTOR: Right, off you go now.

[Tunnel]

BENTON: Jo, are you okay?
JO: Yes, Sergeant.
BENTON: Give me a hand.
JO: Right. That's it.
(Benton and Jo pick up Jones between them, and Benton puts him over his shoulders.
BENTON: Right. Come on, hurry.
JO: Okay.

[Outside the tunnel]

DOCTOR: Get him into the car, quick. You all right?
BENTON: Okay, Doc.
(The Doctor gets back into Bessie and drives them all back down the slag heap.)

[Community Room for Living]

(Jones is on a makeshift bed. Nancy checks his temperature.)
NANCY: But how did it happen?
JO: The blast from the explosion, I think. You see, he was trying to save me from the maggots.
NANCY: Oh, don't worry. I expect it's only concussion. He hasn't broken any bones or anything. He'll be all right, you'll see.
JO: Please God he is. You see, Nancy, it was all my fault.
NANCY: Oh, Jo, you mustn't
(The Doctor enters.)
DOCTOR: Any change, Jo?
JO: No, none.
DOCTOR: I can't understand it. He should have come to by now.
JO: Cliff? Cliff, please wake up, for my sake?
(Jones' eyes open.)
JO: Cliff?
JONES: Serendipity.
(And passes out again.)
JO: Cliff? Cliff!
DOCTOR: What did he say?
JO: Serendipity?
DOCTOR: Serendipity?
NANCY: He'll be all right, love.
(Jo gasps.)
DOCTOR: What is it?
JO: His neck!
(Jones has a glowing green patch on it.)

[Wholeweal Community]

BRIGADIER: Is there anything you can do for him?
DOCTOR: Well, I've given him a broad spectrum antibiotic. That should slow the infection down. No, we must find an answer to those maggots before they pupate. Imagine, thousands of flying insects spreading their infection throughout the world.

[Jones' laboratory]

BRIGADIER: I'd rather not, thank you.
(The Brigadier goes off along the hallway.)
DOCTOR: Serendipity. What on Earth did he mean by serendipity?
(Yates comes out from under a lab bench.)
DOCTOR: Mike! You don't know how glad I am to see you. How did you get away?
YATES: They let me go.
DOCTOR: But why?
YATES: To kill you.
(Yates holds a small pistol with both hands.)
YATES: You do see that I have to kill you, don't you?
DOCTOR: Gently, Mike. Fight it.
YATES: It is necessary to kill you.
DOCTOR: No, it is not necessary. Your orders are false. Do you understand me? False!
(The Brigadier enters.)
BRIGADIER: Doctor, I forgot to mention to you
YATES: Stay back!
BRIGADIER: Captain Yates, what are you
YATES: Stay where you are! I have my instructions.
BRIGADIER: Instructions? Who from?
DOCTOR: Keep quiet, Brigadier, and keep still. Now, Mike, listen to me. It is necessary for me to show you something.
YATES: Necessary?
DOCTOR: Yes. For increased efficiency. Now, I'm going to take something from my pocket. Now, it won't harm you. It won't harm you.
(It is the Metabelis crystal.)
DOCTOR: Watch it, Mike. Watch it carefully, Mike.
(The pointed end of the crystal glows.)
DOCTOR: Strange stones, these Metebelis sapphires. Watch it. Look deep into the blue light. Soon your mind will be locked onto the crystalline pattern and the neural paths of your brain will be swept clean, and you will be free!
(Yates throws his head back, drops the pistol then collapses.)
DOCTOR: So you see, Brigadier? My trip to Metebelis Three wasn't wasted after all.
(But the Brigadier is staring at where the crystal was, too.)
DOCTOR: Oh, good grief! Wake up, Lethbridge Stewart. Wake up.

[Global Chemicals room]

STEVENS: Mister James? Do you hear me, Mister James?
JAMES: I hear you.
STEVENS: Good. How have you been programmed?
JAMES: To obey the BOSS.
STEVENS: At all times?
JAMES: At all times.
STEVENS: Good. Now then, we must go to work. There is very little time left. Here are your instructions.

[Jones' laboratory]

BRIGADIER: He's a trained soldier. He's been taught to withstand that sort of thing.
(Yates wakes up.)
DOCTOR: If he hadn't tried so hard, he's have come in shooting. I'd have been a dead man by now. You too, probably.
YATES: Oh! Where am I?
DOCTOR: You're in the Nuthutch.
YATES: Where?
DOCTOR: Professor Jones' house.
YATES: That blue light.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, you'll be all right now, old chap.
BRIGADIER: Well, Captain Yates, you're well out of Global Chemicals.
DOCTOR: I'm afraid he's not. I'm going to ask you to go back. Do you think you feel up to it?
YATES: Right as rain, Doctor.
DOCTOR: I'm sorry to have to ask you to do this but there's some information that I simply must have. Now, here's what I want you to do.

[Stevens' office]

(Stevens is ticking items off a checklist.)
STEVENS: New York. Seven two oh three slave units prepared.
BOSS: Now reading seven five eight zero.
STEVENS: Zurich. One five eight four.
BOSS: In preparation. Slave unit assessment to follow.
STEVENS: Moscow. Ten zero zero three.
BOSS: Prepared. One one zero zero nine eight.
(Someone knocks on the door.)
STEVENS: Permission?
BOSS: Of course.
(Stevens unlocks the door from his desk controls.)
STEVENS: Come in.
(Yates enters slowly, holding the pistol.)
STEVENS: Well?
YATES: The Doctor is dead.

[Community Room for Living]

(Jones is feverish.)
JO: Shouldn't we get him to hospital?
DOCTOR: What would be the point, Jo? You know what happened to the others. Ordinary treatment won't work.
JO: He won't die, will he?
DOCTOR: He means a lot to you, doesn't he?
JO: Yes.
DOCTOR: Well, then trust me, Jo. I'm sure these injections are doing him some good.
(The Doctor gives Jones an injection.)
JO: Shush. It's all right.
DOCTOR: At least it'll give us time to find the real cure.

[Stevens' office]

(Stevens has the pistol now.)
STEVENS: And the girl?
YATES: No need to worry. She's too concerned about the Professor to make trouble.
STEVENS: All the same, I think it might be advisable to dispose of her too.
YATES: I don't think that would be necessary.
STEVENS: Don't you, now? How very interesting.
(Stevens uses the intercom.)
STEVENS: Stella? Ask Mister James to come in, will you.
YATES: To dispose of the girl would not be efficient.
STEVENS: The time will come. Thank you for your most valuable advice, Mister Yates.
(James enters.)
JAMES: You sent for me?
STEVENS: Yes. Wait here with Mister Yates.
(Stevens gives James the pistol and leaves. Yates stands in front of James and puts his hands in his pockets.)
JAMES: What are you doing?
YATES: Nothing.
(Yates raises his hands, holding the Metabelis crystal.)
YATES: Just concentrate on the blue crystal, Mister James. As you look, you'll see it glow. Watch carefully.
(After a few moments of blue glow, James staggers backwards.)
YATES: Mister James? Your mind's clear now. You have to tell me what's going to happen.
JAMES: Takeover. By the BOSS. At four o'clock this afternoon, the computer is going to
(We hear an electronic howl. James clutches his head and falls.)
STEVENS: Just can't depend on anyone, can you, Mister Yates.

Episode Six

[Jones' laboratory]

(The Brigadier brings a box to the Doctor.)
BRIGADIER: This the sort of thing you mean?
(It is a piece of slag with maggot slime on it.)
DOCTOR: Yes, that's exactly what I mean. Well done, Brigadier. Now I can really get on.
BRIGADIER: Well, I must get a bite to eat. Seems a long time since breakfast.
DOCTOR: Well, Nancy's gone to make some sandwiches, I believe.
BRIGADIER: More of that fungus stuff?
DOCTOR: Yes. Why, don't you like it?
BRIGADIER: Rather have a slice of beef. What are you trying to do?
DOCTOR: Carrying on where Professor Jones left off. I'm trying to find a specific antibiotic reaction.
BRIGADIER: Could be a long job.
DOCTOR: Yes, it could be. You know, I wish I knew what he meant by serendipity.
BRIGADIER: Serendipity?
DOCTOR: Yes, it means making a marvellous discovery by mistake. I have an idea Professor Jones was on the point of a breakthrough.
BRIGADIER: Well, you've got his notes there, haven't you?
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, I have, but it doesn't say a thing. Take a look for yourself.
BRIGADIER: Might as well be in Sanskrit for all it means to me.
(Nancy puts a plate of fungus back in the larder. It looks like the remains of a dark fruit cake. Outside, Benton arrives with something about a metre long wrapped in sack cloth. The Brigadier samples his sandwich.)
BRIGADIER: It's beef. It is beef.
NANCY: It's exactly the same fungus you had last night. It's just cooked differently.
(Benton enters with his bundle and Nancy leaves.)
BENTON: I thought I'd find you here, sir.
DOCTOR: What have you got there, Sergeant?
BENTON: It's a maggot, Doctor. I found it on the edge of the danger area.
BRIGADIER: Is it dead?
BENTON: Not exactly, sir.
(It's the empty shell of a maggot.)
DOCTOR: It's a chrysalis. They're beginning to change.
BRIGADIER: Change? I don't understand.
DOCTOR: Like the metamorphosis of a caterpillar into a butterfly.
BRIGADIER: Yes, but change into what?
DOCTOR: I wish I knew, Brigadier.
BRIGADIER: You mean they might be able to fly?
DOCTOR: Yes.
BRIGADIER: Then we can't stop them. Within a matter of hours they could be all over the countryside.
DOCTOR: Yes, it's horribly possible. Well, they're our number one priority now.
BRIGADIER: And the cure for Professor Jones?
DOCTOR: That'll have to wait, I'm afraid.
(Nancy screams.)
NANCY [OC]: Doctor! Come quickly!

[Community larder]

DOCTOR: What is it, Nancy?
NANCY: It must be the one that escaped from the lab.
(A white maggot lies curled up by the plate of fungus. The Doctor pokes it with a perspex rod.)
DOCTOR: It's dead. It's not a husk like the other one but a complete dead maggot.
BRIGADIER: Yes well, I find the live ones more worrying, Doctor.
DOCTOR: But don't you understand, Brigadier? What killed it?
BENTON: Could it have been something it ate?
NANCY: That's it. The fungus!
DOCTOR: Yes. This could be exactly what we need. How much of this fungus have you got?
NANCY: A whole pile of it in the outhouse.
DOCTOR: Show me, quickly.
NANCY: Right.

[Computer room]

(The computer is humming to itself, happily.)
BOSS: Er, Stevens? Stevens, how did Captain Yates manage to break Mister James' processing?
STEVENS: I don't know. Some specialised hypnotic technique, perhaps.
BOSS: Ah ha. And he also resisted our conditioning programme, didn't he?
STEVENS: He is dangerous. He should be eliminated.
BOSS: No. No, he will make an interesting experiment. Total processing comes next. He shall be the first of the new slave elite. See to it.
STEVENS: Right away.

[By the slag heap]

(Small sacks are being transferred from a UNIT Land Rover to Bessie's back seat.)
BENTON: Come on, lads. Keep 'em moving.
BRIGADIER: Good luck, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Thank you, Brigadier. Right, Benton.
(Benton has to stand on the running board as the Doctor drives off.)

[On the slag heap]

DOCTOR: All right, Sergeant, start scattering.
BENTON: A pleasure, Doctor.
(Benton throws pieces of fungus out for the maggots, who rush towards it and gulp it down like goldfish with fish food.)

[By the slag heap]

BRIGADIER: They're taking the bait, Doctor.

[On the slag heap]

DOCTOR: There's some down here, Sergeant.
BENTON: Right.
DOCTOR: Right alongside the car.
BENTON: Got 'em!
DOCTOR: That's it.

[By the slag heap]

BRIGADIER: Hello, Doctor. Hello, Doctor. It's working.
(The greedy maggots stop moving.)
BRIGADIER: Doctor, it's working. I say again, it's working. They're dying like, well, like maggots.

[On the slag heap]

BRIGADIER: We've licked them!
DOCTOR: Not quite, Brigadier. Remember that empty skin.

[By the slag heap]

DOCTOR [OC]: I haven't seen any more about, but you never know.
(The Doctor and Benton are watched by a giant black and yellow insect.)

[Community Room for Living]

(Jones' green patch has grown.)
JO: Nancy, he's getting worse! Isn't there anything we can do?
NANCY: Just keep him as comfortable as possible, I suppose. The Doctor will be back soon.
JO: But even he doesn't know what to do, does he. Shush, Cliff. It's all right. Shush.

[Global Chemicals room]

(Yates is hanging by his wrists from those chains in the ceiling.)
STEVENS: Well, young man, you have escaped us once. Believe me, it won't happen again. Bring him along.
(Two guards let Yates down and carry him out along the corridor to the lift. Once the doors open, Yates pushes the guards in on top of Stevens and runs as the doors close again.)

[By the slag heap]

BRIGADIER: Sector four, report. Over.
BENTON [OC]: Vehicle now approaching last group of creatures. All others destroyed. Over. Kitty, kitty, kitty. Come on. Come and get your lovely din-dins! Come on, kitty, kit
DOCTOR: Sergeant Benton!
(The last maggots die as the insect crests the slag heap.)
DOCTOR: Well, that seems to be the last of them, Benton. Let's get back to the Brigadier.
BENTON: Right.
(The impossible insect flies after Bessie.)

[By the slag heap]

(The Brigadier sees it through his binoculars.)
BRIGADIER: Good grief! Doctor.

[On the slag heap]

BRIGADIER [OC]: Look out! Look out above you!
(The Doctor stops Bessie.)
BENTON: Doctor, get down!

[By the slag heap]

BRIGADIER: Doctor, it's attacking again!

[On the slag heap]

DOCTOR: Keep down, Sergeant!
(The insect buzzes them, then squirts green liquid which hits Bessie's windscreen.)

[By the slag heap]

BRIGADIER: What is he trying to do?

[On the slag heap]

(As the insect comes in for another pass, the Doctor takes of his cape and tosses it in the air. There is a cracking sound as the insect flies into it and crashes to the ground under the weight. The Doctor and Benton run over to it.)
DOCTOR: Careful, Sergeant. What a beautiful creature.
BENTON: (sarcastic) Oh yes, Doctor, beautiful.

[Community Room for Living]

(Yates runs across Global Chemical's flat roof, onto the main entrance, down and away.)
DOCTOR: And you say he was delirious?
NANCY: For a while, yes, but then he seemed to go into a coma.
DOCTOR: Can you remember what he said?
JO: No. It was just nonsense. He didn't make any sense.
DOCTOR: Jo, think hard. You were with him in the lab. Did he seem on the track of a cure?
JO: No, not at all.
DOCTOR: Oh, it's very curious. Well, I shall just have to hope for some serendipity of my own.
JO: Doctor? What is serendipity?
DOCTOR: A happy accident.
JO: I had an accident with Cliff. I spilt some brown powder all over his slides. He wasn't very happy about it.
DOCTOR: Jo, that's it! Do you happen to remember which powder?
JO: Yes, I think so.
DOCTOR: Then come and show me, quickly. Come on!
(Yates runs on around the edge of the slag heap.)

[Jones' laboratory]

DOCTOR: And you're positive this is the one?
JO: Positive.
DOCTOR: Well, I should have guessed. It's the same fungus that killed that maggot.
JO: You mean that's the cure?
DOCTOR: It must be!

[On the slag heap]

(UNIT soldiers are collecting up the dead maggots.)
BRIGADIER: Right, Benton, now we know how to deal with these creatures, the next thing is to get the National Coal Board to open up that emergency shaft. We have to make certain that it's all quite clear of those creatures, not only down the mine but all the possible ways up to the surface.
YATES: Brigadier, sir! The computer, sir! The computer!

[Jones' laboratory]

DOCTOR: So, what's the computer going to do?
YATES: That's just it, Doctor, I don't know. But whatever it is, it's pretty big and it's going to happen at four o'clock.
DOCTOR: Right. Well, I'll get up there as soon as I finish this.
NANCY: What is it you're doing?
DOCTOR: Making an aqueous extract of the amino fraction of this fungus.
NANCY: For an injection?
DOCTOR: That's right.
NANCY: I can do that. I'm not just a mum here, you know.
DOCTOR: Thank you, Nancy. Jo, make up the paste from that fungus powder and apply it to the green stain on Cliff's neck.
JO: Okay.
DOCTOR: All right, Captain Yates, where's the Brigadier?
YATES: He's gone to Global Chemicals. Hopes to confront the Director and get him to talk.

[Computer room]

BOSS: Stevens? You are inefficient but you are also a fool. As Oscar Wilde so very nearly said, to lose one prisoner may be accounted a misfortune, to lose two smacks of carelessness.
STEVENS: I'm very sorry.
BOSS: No, they can't harm us now, my little superman. It's too late.
STEVENS: We're going ahead then?
BOSS: Well, naturally. Report.
STEVENS: The medical staff have completed all implantations, and all slave units are now ready to be activated.
BOSS: Good, good! Establish links with the seven international computers. The countdown to phase one can begin. Well, get on with it!

[Global Chemicals]

(The Brigadier, Benton and some soldiers are being kept waiting outside the main gate.)
GUARD: It's no good, sir.
BRIGADIER: For heaven's sake, man. Don't you know who I am?
GUARD: Makes no difference. Nobody's getting in.
(The Doctor and Yates arrive in Bessie.)
BRIGADIER: Wretched fellow won't let me in.
DOCTOR: Well, thank goodness for that. I shall go in alone.
BRIGADIER: Now, Doctor
DOCTOR: Brigadier, if I'm not out of there by three minutes to four, you and the rest of your clod-hopping friends can come in
BRIGADIER: And rescue you?
DOCTOR: No, I'm afraid not. If I'm not out by then, I shall be dead. No, you must go in and try and destroy that computer. Right, now lets synchronise our watches.
GUARD: It's no good, sir. I've already explained to the Brigadier.

[Computer room]

(BOSS has moved on to humming Wagner.)
STEVENS: Right, phase one countdown completed. We're falling behind time.
BOSS: Stevens, you know, we should have arranged for a symphony orchestra to herald my triumph. To take over the world, to sweep into power on the crest of a wave of Wagnerian sound! You like that idea, of course?
STEVENS: Please!
BOSS: No? Oh, er, the 1812, perhaps? Or would we dare the Glorious Ninth?
STEVENS: We must go ahead!
BOSS: Oh, Stevens, you're a dull fool too. Very well. Activate the total processing of the slave elite.
(BOSS hums Chopin's Funeral March - Where Will We Be In A Hundred Years From Now?)

[Global Chemicals]

GUARD: I'm sorry, sir. I must ask you and this gentleman to move right away from this area.
DOCTOR: Now look here, my dear fellow
(The guard points his rifle at the Doctor.)
GUARD: If you take one step into
(A wailing sound starts up and the guard closes his eyes tight.)
DOCTOR: Right, come on, get it up!
(The Brigadier pushes up the barrier and the Doctor runs into the complex.)

[Computer room]

(BOSS has moved onto Beethoven's Fifth.)
BOSS: Tan, tan, ta ra! Tan, tan, ta ra!
STEVENS: There is no time to be lost! Until final link-up takes place and the slave units are responding, we are quite defenceless!
BOSS: Tan, tan, tara zing boom tan, tan tara.
STEVENS: Please, listen to me!
BOSS: Oh, not even a little fan-fare? You're unkind, Stevens.
STEVENS: Links by landline are complete. Radio links are now being established. It is only a matter of minutes.
BOSS: Minutes before the moment of truth sails towards us on time's winged chariot. I love a really juicy mixed metaphor, Stevens. Oh, very well, phase two.
(Stevens sits in the alcove, holding the headset.)
BOSS: Discontinue primary function. Connect!
(Stevens flips a switch and puts on the headset. BOSS sings along to Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 in G.)
BOSS: Connect, connect, connect, connect, connect, connect, connect, zing boom!
(The Doctor runs through the corridors, sonic screwdriver at the ready.)

[Community Room for Living]

(Nancy gives Jones the fungal injection as Jo puts the paste on the green. His breathing becomes more normal.)
NANCY: I think it's going to work.
(Jones wakes.)
JONES: Hello, Nancy. Oh, Jo! Oh, Jo!
(Jones kisses Jo's fingers.)

[Outside Global Chemicals]

BENTON: Only six minutes left, sir.
BRIGADIER: Come on, Doctor.

[Computer room]

(Stevens is now at one with BOSS as the Doctor bursts in.)
DOCTOR: Stevens! Stevens, listen to me, I've got to talk to you. You've got to stop this.
(Stevens' mouth moves in time with BOSS's words.)
BOSS: Stevens no longer exists, Doctor. Say what you have to say to me.
DOCTOR: Of course you still exist. Don't listen to this, this machine. Fight it!
BOSS: Too late, Doctor. In five minutes, my power will be extended to seven other complexes throughout the world. Think of that. You have failed in your poor little attempt to halt our progress towards maximum efficiency and productivity.
DOCTOR: Stevens, listen to me. You've seen where this efficiency of yours leads. Wholesale pollution of the countryside. Devilish creatures spawned by the filthy by-products of your technology. Men walking around like brainless vegetables. Death. Disease. Destruction.
BOSS: Teething problems. They will be dealt with in due course.
DOCTOR: In the usual efficient way, I suppose. Elimination.
BOSS: Four minutes.
DOCTOR: Stevens, I want you to look at this crystal. Look at this sapphire. Look deep into its blue light.
(Stevens' eyes flicker towards the Metabelis crystal.)
BOSS: Concentrate on the task in hand, Stevens.
DOCTOR: Don't listen to this machine. You're the one in control. Fight it! Look at this crystal. Look at it. Look deep into the blue light. Look at it. Look at it!
(Stevens stares at the pulsing blue crystal.)
DOCTOR: Look at it. Look at it, Stevens. Look deep into the blue light. Look at it.
STEVENS: Doctor, I, help me.
BOSS: No. No, I am the one who speaks. Think of our great plan, our dream!
STEVENS: I, I'm sorry. I shall speak!
DOCTOR: That's it, fight it. Fight it! You're a human being!
STEVENS: Isn't there another answer?
BOSS: No, no, no! You and I are one!
STEVENS: But the disease, the deaths!
BOSS: Sad necessities!
STEVENS: No! There must be another way.
(Stevens reaches for the headset but collapses, so the Doctor pulls it off for him.)
STEVENS: Get out. Quickly!
DOCTOR: Come with me.
STEVENS: No. No.
(Stevens pushes buttons in the alcove.)
STEVENS: I'm cross-feeding the generator circuitry. In two minutes the whole place'll go up. Warn the others! Get out!
(BOSS makes groaning sounds, as if in pain.)
STEVENS: You have two minutes!
(The Doctor leaves as Stevens rushes round the room pressing buttons on lots of different consoles.)
BOSS: Reverse pulse. Tan, tan tara. Loss of control. Stevens. Integrate booster function. Please. Please. We've been such good friends. Stevens, Stevens, please, please. Argh, it hurts! The pain! My circuits are on fire! No! Who would have thought it would come to this? Stevens, Stevens, my friend. My sentimental friend.
(Stevens goes back to the alcove.)
BOSS: My friend!
(Steven flicks one last switch and everything goes quiet.)

[Outside Global Chemicals]

DOCTOR: Get down everyone! Take cover!
BRIGADIER: Right, take cover, everyone!
(The Doctor grabs the swaying guard.)
DOCTOR: Come on! Come on!
(They all get down behind the vehicles as Global Chemicals goes KaBOOM in an explosion worthy of Derek Meddings.)

[Community Room for Living]

JONES: Oh, Nancy, that fungus soup is delicious. Is there any more?
NANCY: I'm afraid I haven't got any more made at the moment. The UNIT troops have scoffed the lot.
DOCTOR: Including the Brigadier?
NANCY: Including the Brigadier.
(Nancy leaves.)
JO: Well, you're feeling better all right.
JONES: Aye.
DOCTOR: Well, Jo, we'd better get back to UNIT HQ. We've got a report to make out.
JO: Doctor.
(Jones nods at Jo.)
JO: I don't think I'll be going back just yet.
DOCTOR: Oh? Are you thinking of staying here?
JO: Well, not here exactly. Only you see, Cliff is going on this expedition to look for this fantastic fungus.
DOCTOR: Where?
JONES: The upper reaches of the Amazon.
JO: And he's asked me to go with him.
DOCTOR: And you want to go?
JO: More than anything else in the world.
DOCTOR: I see. When?
JONES: Well, very soon now. We'll just stop off in Cardiff, pick up our supplies, get married and
JO: Married?
JONES: Aye.
(Jo and Jones gaze into each other's eyes.)
DOCTOR: Er, look, will you excuse me? I do think I'm going to be wanted on the telephone.
(The Doctor leaves.)
JO: You didn't say anything about getting married.
JONES: Didn't I? I'm sorry, love. You will, of course?
JO: Yes, of course, I will!
JONES: Oh! Right.
JO: Yes!
(Jones sweeps Jo off her feet.)
JONES: Yee-haa! God, life's good, isn't it?
BRIGADIER: What's going on?
NANCY: Are you all right, Jo?
JONES: Go on, tell them.
JO: Cliff and I are going to get married.
BENTON: Getting married?
YATES: Well, that's marvellous. Congratulations, Professor Jones.
JONES: Thank you.
BRIGADIER: Congratulations, Jo. Not before time.
YATES: (to Jo) I'm sure he'll make you very happy.
BRIGADIER: Well, Professor Jones.
JONES: Thank you, Brigadier.
BRIGADIER: I've got a wedding present for you. It's a telex from Geneva, granting your place here official status as a United Nations Priority One Research Complex.
JONES: Oh, what!
BENTON: Well done!
JONES: Do you know what that means? It means unlimited financial help. Work for the valleys.
BENTON: That's great.
JONES: Aye, and food! Food for all the world!
BRIGADIER: Never mind, Mike. Let's have a drink.
DOCTOR: You got onto your uncle at United Nations, didn't you?
JO: It's only the second time I've ever asked him for anything.
DOCTOR: Yes, and look where the first time got you.
JO: You don't mind, do you?
DOCTOR: Mind? He might even be able to turn you into a scientist.
JO: Don't go too far away, will you? And if you do, come back and see us sometime.
DOCTOR: Yes.
BRIGADIER: Thank you. Lovely.
DOCTOR: Save me a piece of wedding cake.
JO: Right.
DOCTOR: Oh, I nearly forgot. Your wedding present.
(The Doctor gives Jo the Metabelis crystal.)
JO: It's beautiful. Thank you, Doctor.
JONES: Hey, Jo, come and drink a toast to the happy couple.
JO: But that's us.
JONES: Aye, so it is. Don't worry, Doctor. I'll look after her.
BRIGADIER: Are you ready? Are you all ready?
BENTON: Would you like a drink, Professor?
BRIGADIER: Well now. Now, quiet everyone. Quiet for a moment. Now, well, er, here's to you both.
BENTON: Here, here!
YATES: Here's to you both.
NANCY: Congratulations.
(The Doctor sneaks out and only Jo notices.)
BENTON: For, he's a jolly good fellow
ALL: For they are jolly good fellows, for they are jolly good fellows, and so say all of us.

[Wholeweal Community]

BRIGADIER [OC]: Jolly good. Right, now
(Music and laughter start up as the Doctor walks through the sheep to Bessie, herded by a collie dog. After a few moments, he starts her up.)
Nancy and Benton dance together, Jo and Jones kiss and embrace.)
BRIGADIER [OC]: Ah, well, there you are, you see.
(The Doctor and Bessie drive along the horizon against the setting sun.)

<Back to the episode listing

Doctor Who and related marks are trademarks of BBC . Copyright © 1963, Present. The web pages on this site are for educational and entertainment purposes only. All other copyrights property of their respective holders.