Planet of Giants

Original Airdate: 31 Oct, 1964

Episode One - Planet of Giants

[Tardis]

DOCTOR: We're approaching a planet.
IAN: Which one?
DOCTOR: We shall soon see.
BARBARA: Ow!
DOCTOR: What's the matter, my dear?
BARBARA: I've burnt myself. It's hot!
DOCTOR: Oh, something overheating here. Just as well we're landing. Susan, check the fault locator, please.
SUSAN: Yes, Grandfather.
BARBARA: We're not going to blow up or anything, are we?
DOCTOR: Oh, no, no, of course not. It's just, well, there we were, in the late eighteenth century and I tried another frequency to side-step the ship back into the middle of the twentieth century.
SUSAN: There's something on QR18, Grandfather, and A14D.
(A klaxon sounds)
SUSAN: Grandfather! Grandfather! The door's opening!
DOCTOR: What's happening? (frantically flipping switches) Close the doors, please. We haven't materialised properly. Quickly!
IAN: What do you mean, close the doors?
DOCTOR: Don't argue, dear boy. It's an emergency! Close the doors!
(Susan, Barbara and Ian rush to push the doors shut, and finally succeed)
BARBARA: Is everything all right?
DOCTOR: We're just landing.
IAN: Are you all right, Doctor?
DOCTOR: What?
IAN: Are you all right?
DOCTOR: Oh, please don't bother me.
BARBARA: What happened just then?
DOCTOR: Susan, go back to the fault locator and I want you to check everything, child. Do you understand? Everything!
BARBARA: Well, at least we seem to be all right.
DOCTOR: Oh, don't be childish. They opened. The doors opened before we properly materialised.
IAN: But what does it mean? Look, you needn't keep it a secret from us.
DOCTOR: What?
BARBARA: Doctor, don't keep us in suspense.
DOCTOR: Oh, don't go on with these futile questions, please. Can't you understand? Can't you see?
IAN: No, we can't. That's just it.
DOCTOR: We were just about to materialise, when the doors opened and we hadn't properly adjusted.
BARBARA: You mean something went out of the ship?
DOCTOR: No, that's impossible.
IAN: Came inside?
DOCTOR: Oh please, don't keep talking on the twentieth century level. I'm talking about time travel. Neither of you can understand what I'm talking about, I can see that.
IAN: How could we? You've never explained it to us.
DOCTOR: My dear boy, I
SUSAN: Grandfather, everything's all right. There isn't a fault anywhere, not even a yellow standby.
DOCTOR: There must be something wrong, Susan. I shall have to check that fault locator myself to make sure. Excuse me.
BARBARA: Oh, I do wish he wouldn't talk in riddles.
IAN: So do I. Susan, perhaps you can help us.
SUSAN: I just know the most dangerous moment is at the point of materialisation.
BARBARA: Nothing's ever happened to us before.
SUSAN: Well the doors have never opened like that before.
DOCTOR: Well, happily no harm's been done. It's most puzzling. Oh, my dear Barbara, was I rude to you just now? If so I'm so sorry. I always forget the niceties under pressure. Please forgive me.
BARBARA: There's nothing to forgive.
DOCTOR: Thank you. Well, I suppose everything's all right and you see the temperature there. It's quite safe to go outside. Oh, Susan, just turn on the scanner and let's try and see where we are.
(The scanner goes bang)
SUSAN: It's shattered!
IAN: Perhaps you need a new tube, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Did you notice the way it blew out?
BARBARA: Yes, it was like an internal explosion of some sort.
DOCTOR: Like something too big for it's frame.
BARBARA: Yes.
DOCTOR: But yet I don't know, that can't be right.
IAN: What do we do now, Doctor? Take the scanner out and strip it down?
DOCTOR: Oh, no, no, no, dear boy. No, it's most puzzling of course, but now we don't know what's behind those doors.
BARBARA: Well, we must go outside and look. You said it was quite safe.
DOCTOR: Yes. I wonder why the? Well, we must see.
SUSAN: Shall I open the doors, Grandfather?
DOCTOR: Yes, please, Susan. But all of you, cautiously, please.
(Barbara and Susan go out)
IAN: Doctor, what made the doors open before?
DOCTOR: The space pressure was far too great whilst we were materialising. The strange thing is that we all came out of it unscathed. It's most puzzling. It's a big mystery, my boy. Come along.

[Outside the Tardis]

(Susan and Barbara are examining something by a rock face)
SUSAN: It's like a vine or something.
DOCTOR: Now why wouldn't the scanner show us all this, hmm?
IAN: Perhaps that was the only damage to the ship, Doctor. Overloading on the scanner circuits.
DOCTOR: Yes, I suppose so. It could be. What a strange rock formation.
IAN: Yes it is, isn't it.
BARBARA: There are two different types of rock. Doctor, look. This is ordinary stone up here, but this down here seems to be quite different.
DOCTOR: Chesterton, here, come here. Look here, is that cement?
IAN: It might be.
DOCTOR: Rather a rough kind, isn't it?
IAN: Yes, very rough. They look like pebbles of sand, don't they.
DOCTOR: Yes. It's manufactured, anyway, to hold the stone in place. You know, to fix it firmly beneath.
SUSAN: I'd have thought the stone was heavy enough to keep itself in place.
DOCTOR: Yes, it's all most odd, isn't it. Most odd. Now, Barbara, I suggest that you and I take that path and Susan and you, sir, go that way.
IAN: Yes, all right, but stay within calling distance, and if you see anything, sing out. We'll do the same.
DOCTOR: Yes, yes.
(Ian and Susan go off, then Barbara sees a very strange, large thing on the rock face)
BARBARA: Doctor! Doctor, it's a huge snake!
DOCTOR: What? A snake?
BARBARA: Let's call the others.
DOCTOR: Wait, wait, wait. Yes, I think it's dead.
BARBARA: That's a fantastic size.
DOCTOR: No eyes, no head. you see. The skin's interesting, isn't it.
BARBARA: Interesting?
DOCTOR: Yes, it's a down, you see.
BARBARA: Doctor, are you sure it isn't just sleeping?
DOCTOR: Oh, no, no, no, it's quite dead. No, no. Death, you see, has it's own particular posture and appearance. Yes, yes. Let's go a bit further.
(Meanwhile)
IAN: Warm, isn't it.
SUSAN: Yes. Ian, look at this.
(a large curved object on the ground)
IAN: That's odd. I suppose it couldn't be an egg. Not that size.
SUSAN: There are more of them over there, look.
IAN: Yes. Ostrich? Ought to be rounder than this.
SUSAN: Strange. There are dozens of them over here. There's a whole pile of them.
(then she comes face to face with a giant insect)
SUSAN: Ian! Ian! It is dead, isn't it?
IAN: Yes. It's dead, all right. Stiff as a poker. What a fantastic size.
SUSAN: Yes.
IAN: It's a giant ant.
SUSAN: It's a fighter, is he? Looks as though it was trying to carry these eggs.
IAN: Yes, well, it's natural behaviour for an ant when it's attacked. Take the eggs to safety. The worker ant'd give his life rather than abandon the eggs, you know.
SUSAN: Well he couldn't have had much of a chance, could he? I mean, he must have died quickly.
IAN: Yes. Look at these eggs scattered about. The other ants must have been frightened away. I wonder what sort of a world could produce an insect that size.
(further along)
DOCTOR: Well, here we are then. This is the tail end of it, and I know what it is. It's a huge earthworm.
BARBARA: What?
DOCTOR: Yes, there are no earthworms this size on your planet.
BARBARA: You're right, there aren't.
DOCTOR: You know, except for its size, I could swear that it came from your world. Well, let's go on. Come along.
BARBARA: It's a bit like a maze, really, all these channels. We'd better be careful not to get lost.
DOCTOR: Oh, no, we won't, no, and I'm determined not to go back until we discover something more definite. At the moment we only have one phenomenon and this mystery.
BARBARA: What mystery?
DOCTOR: Well, all this maze you're talking about. You know, I admit it's a bit haphazard, but it seems to have some kind of pattern about it. And this pattern suggests to me that there's a brain with a purpose behind it all. Come along.
(elsewhere)
SUSAN: Ian, I counted six of those dead ants.
IAN: Yes, I know. They're all about us, everywhere. Now this is really baffling.
(It is a massive billboard, or so it seems)
SUSAN: A huge picture of Night-Scented Stock.
IAN: Yes, it is. But why put up a picture of it? I don't get it. The writing. Seed Company Limited, Norwich.
SUSAN: Norwich! That's England, isn't it? Norfolk.
IAN: Yes, it is. Susan, this means we're on Earth. Something very odd here. First those ants, now this. I suppose it couldn't be part of a crazy exhibition. You know, where everything had been increased in size.
(Meanwhile)
DOCTOR: Well now, this is interesting. This has been cut by a manufacturer. Look out!
(The piece of timber falls over)
DOCTOR: Are you all right?
BARBARA: Yes. Fine.
DOCTOR: That was a near miss. It would have given you a nasty headache.
SUSAN: Hey, look at the end of that. It's all charred.
DOCTOR: You can see quite clearly what this is. It's a matchstick.
BARBARA: It certainly looks like one.
DOCTOR: No, it doesn't just look like one, it is a matchstick.
BARBARA: What, that size?
DOCTOR: Don't you see? That huge earthworm, and now this? Can't you see what's happened, hmm?
(Back at the flower picture)
IAN: I don't understand this at all, Susan. I'm going to have a look round the other side of this.
SUSAN: All right.
IAN: Look at this matchbox. (he climbs in) It must be an exhibition, Susan. Something like the World's Fair, things this size.
SUSAN: No, Ian.
IAN: Well, what else? Look at the scale of things.
SUSAN: You're wrong, Ian. Completely wrong. I thought just now that something was wrong when I saw that, but now I'm sure.
IAN: All right, what's your theory then?
SUSAN: These things haven't been made bigger. We've been made smaller.
(at the match)
BARBARA: Smaller?
DOCTOR: We have been reduced roughly to the size of an inch.
(matchbox)
IAN: An inch?
(at the match)
DOCTOR: You, me, all of us and the ship.
(Then we are shown that the Tardis is in a gap in the crazy paving of a garden path)
DOCTOR: We must get hold of the others quickly and return to the Tardis.
(at the matchbox)
IAN: No, Susan, no. It can't be.
SUSAN: I'm right, Ian. I know I am. That's the danger Grandfather was afraid of when the doors opened. He wouldn't admit it was possible, that's all.
IAN: It isn't possible, Susan. It's ridiculous.
SUSAN: Oh, Ian, work it out for yourself. The doors of Tardis opened. That means the space pressure caused us to reduce.
(It suddenly goes dark and there is a loud noise)
IAN: What's that?
SUSAN: What is it?
IAN: Run, Susan, run!
(A man picks up his briefcase and matchbox and walks to the house. The light returns)
SUSAN: Ian? Ian, where are you!
BARBARA [OC]: Susan!
SUSAN: Barbara!
BARBARA [OC]: Susan!
SUSAN: Barbara, over here.
(Barbara and the Doctor come around the seed packet)
SUSAN: Oh, Barbara!
BARBARA: Susan, what's the matter?
DOCTOR: What's happened?
SUSAN: There was a great big matchbox, a huge one, and Ian and I came to have a look and he sat on it, and there was this terrible noise and he fell inside it and now it's gone! It's gone and Ian's inside it!
BARBARA: All right, Susan, it's all right.
DOCTOR: Well someone picked it up, I suppose.
(The owner of the matchbox puts it down, and Ian massages his sore shoulders)

[Edge of paving stone]

SUSAN: We can climb this and see over the top. Oh Barbara, I can't reach it.
BARBARA: All right, I'll do it.
DOCTOR: No, no, now, please, no. Let me do it. You might hurt yourself. You just let me, hmm.
SUSAN: Be careful, Grandfather.
DOCTOR: Yes, yes.
SUSAN: Steady.
DOCTOR: I'm all right. Yes, well it looks a tremendous distance to me. There's a house over there, and there's a man sitting down, reading something. It's a notebook, I think.
BARBARA: Did he have a matchbox?
DOCTOR: How do I know?
BARBARA: I don't know how you know, but do you suppose he could have?
DOCTOR: Yes, I suppose so. Watch what you're doing, will you?
BARBARA: Well, look, Doctor, give us some hope. I mean, Ian's inside that matchbox.
DOCTOR: Gently, gently, gently. We've got to find Chesterton.
SUSAN: Grandfather, supposing the man walks off with it?
DOCTOR: Courage, my dear. I know all this is a bit of a nightmare, but we've just got to get Ian back and then we can go back to the ship.
SUSAN: And then can you get us back to normal size?
DOCTOR: Of course, yes, I'll try. There's always a chance. But first things first. We must find Chesterton. We can't go back that way. We must go back the same way that we came.

[Patio]

(The man is reading a small notebook. Then he takes a cigarette from a packet and puts it in his mouth. He spots a cat cleaning itself and calls to it, but it takes no notice of him. He puts his notebook into the briefcase and is about to pick up his matchbox when another man offers him a light instead)
FARROW: Oh, hello. Thank you. Mister Forrester, isn't it? We spoke on the telephone.
FORRESTER: Yes, I got here as quickly as I could. I hope you haven't taken any action yet.
FARROW: Not yet, but I have written my report.
FORRESTER: You do realise what's at stake here, Mister Farrow? The early experiments were noted by the Ministry, welcomed in fact. I've already geared factories, advertising and all the rest of it to start pushing DN6.
FARROW: I'm sorry about that, but I can't give you the approval that you want.
FORRESTER: We could of course spend more time on the refining.
FARROW: Oh, there's much more to it than that, as I mentioned to you on the telephone.
FORRESTER: You want to bring in another expert to go over the tests again.
FARROW: You're not a scientist, are you. Well, let me put it this way. On the surface, DN6 appears to have all the characteristics of a major breakthrough in the manufacture of insecticide. I can quite understand why you've pinned all your hopes on it, particularly as my own Minister was so enthusiastic. But the very exhaustive tests I have made show that DN6 is totally destructive.
FORRESTER: Well, that was the idea, wasn't it? I mean, Smithers says it'll even prevent locusts from breeding, wipe them out altogether.
FARROW: I don't think I'm making myself quite clear. There are many insects which make a vital contribution to agriculture, and these insects must not die. Did you know that?
FORRESTER: Does Smithers know about this?
FARROW: Well, I have expressed my doubts to him, but he's so engrossed in this venture that I shall have to break the hard facts to him very gently.
FORRESTER: I see. You're aware, of course, that if it doesn't go into production I shall be completely ruined.
FARROW: That is very unfortunate, but really you should have waited until we'd given you the go-ahead.
FORRESTER: Well that's all very well, but it doesn't help me, does it. Surely we can work something out. There's a fortune to be made out of this.
FARROW: I don't think I want to go on with this conversation. Really I shouldn't be seeing you at all, except that I did promise over the phone that I'd explain the facts to you in person.
FORRESTER: What happens now?
FARROW: Well, officially my holiday commenced yesterday. I've a small boat down in the harbour and I'm going to make a tour of the rivers of France. But before I go today, I shall telephone my Ministry and then post them my report.
> FORRESTER: Couldn't you leave it until you get back from your holiday? Give me a little grace?
FARROW: Oh, you know I couldn't do that.
FORRESTER: Do you know why I'm a success, Mister Farrow? Because I've never allowed the word can't to exist. There's always a way. Always.
FARROW: Not this time. This isn't business, this is science. The formula is unacceptable and I can't, and I do mean can't, Mister Forrester, allow DN6 to go into production. Now I'll make that phone call.
(Forrester draws a small pistol)
FORRESTER: Just a moment.

[Garden path]

(A bee suddenly falls to the ground in front of the travellers)
BARBARA: Don't move.
DOCTOR: It's not moving.
SUSAN: Don't touch it.
DOCTOR: It's perfectly stiff.
BARBARA: It could still sting.
DOCTOR: Ha! What an awe-inspiring sight. Now what chance would human beings have, I really wonder, in the world of creatures like this bee, hmm?
SUSAN: None at all.
DOCTOR: Take a closer look.
SUSAN: Well I haven't taken my eyes off it, Grandfather. It hasn't even trembled. I think you're right. It is dead.
DOCTOR: It's the same distinctive aroma.
BARBARA: Yes, I've noticed it on all the other dead things.
SUSAN: Well that must be what's killing them, then.
DOCTOR: I wonder what it is that could kill off nature like this.
SUSAN: What worries me is all the different things it's killing. Things that fly in the air, things that move on the ground, things that move under the ground. It's so indiscriminate.
BARBARA: Doctor, whatever it is that's killing these things, could it kill us too?
DOCTOR: Well, we must presume that it can. So no eating or drinking until we've done our very best to find Ian, hmm?
(There's a loud noise)
SUSAN: That's not thunder, surely?
DOCTOR: Sounded more like an ancient cannon.

[Patio]

(Farrow is dead. Ian has the chance to climb out of the matchbox)

[Garden path]

DOCTOR: Well, we're progressing nicely.
BARBARA: Seen a lot more of those dead ants, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Yes. Rather wide-spread, I'm afraid.
BARBARA: Oh dear. I wonder what would have happened to us if any of those creatures had still been alive.
DOCTOR: Yes, I wonder. I wonder.
(Ian holds up his handkerchief in front of Farrow's nose to check he isn't breathing. Then we next meet him back with the others)
SUSAN: And you say you saw that man?
IAN: Yes, he's over here.
BARBARA: Oh, not any further, please. I'm exhausted. It's taken us ages to get here.
DOCTOR: What's that smell? Cordite? Gunpowder, hmm?
IAN: Yes. That would explain the explosion, and also the man. It's not far. Come on and I'll show you.

[By Farrow's body]

(The cat is keeping an eye on them)
IAN: He's been shot dead.
BARBARA: Are you sure he is dead?
IAN: Oh, yes.
BARBARA: There's nothing but death all around us.
SUSAN: Yes, what's happening here?
DOCTOR: You weren't with us, Chesterton, but every insect we came across is dead.
IAN: Yes, Susan and I saw a great many huge dead ants.
SUSAN: And everything else is the same here.
DOCTOR: Yes, and we don't know what it was that killed them. That man, he's been shot, murdered.
BARBARA: What would kill insects in a perfectly ordinary garden. I mean, pests one can understand, but surely it's wrong to bees and worms and things, isn't it?
DOCTOR: Quite so. Both are vital to the growth of things. However, we must leave this simple mystery and get back to the ship. As I said, my dear, it's fortunate for all of us that everything is dead.
(Susan turns round and screams)
SUSAN: Argh! Grandfather!
(It's the cat)

Episode Two - Dangerous Journey

IAN: Don't move, any of you.
DOCTOR: And whatever you do, don't look into the cat's eyes. Close your own if you want to.
IAN: Doctor, I think the cat's losing interest.
DOCTOR: Don't relax. One swipe of its paw would smash us to pieces.
(The cat moves off)
DOCTOR: Well, we can't get back to the ship just yet, and you know how fast cats can move. And another thing, we could be mistaken for mice and I don't fancy being part of the cat's diet.
BARBARA: It gets more horrifying every moment.
SUSAN: Couldn't we make contact with the people here somehow?
DOCTOR: No, I'm afraid not.
SUSAN: Well, why not? They might be able to help us.
DOCTOR: It's out of the question, my dear. How can we possibly communicate with them?
IAN: Imagine a record played at the wrong speed, Susan. We'd sound like a little squeak to them and they'd sound like a low growl to us.
BARBARA: Anyway, even if we could communicate, what would they do to us? We're freaks. They'd put us in a glass case and examine us through a microscope.
SUSAN: Oh, that's a thought, isn't it.
DOCTOR: Yes, and I would add another and more important factor. The people who live in this house are murderers. Or one of them is. Therefore we can't expect sympathy and understanding from an insane or a criminal mind.
SUSAN: Yes, what about that dead man?
BARBARA: Oughtn't we to do something about it?
DOCTOR: Well, what can we do, my dear? I mean, surely this is the question. Normally I wouldn't hesitate, but the destruction of the life force is frightful. There it is. I mean, what can we do as we are?
IAN: Well, I can't see any sign of that cat, for how much safety that gives us.
DOCTOR: Well, shall we proceed?
(It suddenly goes dark)
IAN: I can see a huge leg coming. Run!
(Barbara trips)
IAN: Oh, Barbara. Go on, Susan.
SUSAN: Let me help you, Ian.
IAN: Go on!
BARBARA: Sorry.
IAN: It's all right. This way, quickly.
(Once again, the four are split up into pairs)
SUSAN: Grandfather, they were almost stepped on!
DOCTOR: Oh, they're all right, they're all right. It's a pity they didn't come this way, though.
SUSAN: Shall we go over to them?
DOCTOR: No, no, it's dangerous. Let's go over to that pipe there.

[Farrow's briefcase]

IAN: Barbara, quick, in the briefcase. It's our only chance.

[Patio]

SMITHERS: You're sure he's dead?
FORRESTER: Of course I'm sure. You know he had a gun.
SMITHERS: He didn't seem the sort of man who'd need one.
FORRESTER: He pulled it out of his pocket and told me he was stealing the formula. I struggled with him. The gun must have been turned into his body. It went off.
(Smithers rolls the body over)
SMITHERS: I wouldn't try telling that story to the police, if I were you.
FORRESTER: Oh? Why not?
SMITHERS: Oh, don't be a fool. He's been shot through the heart from some feet away. Even I can see that and I'm no expert. No powder burns around the bullet hole.
FORRESTER: You're very detached about it.
SMITHERS: What did you expect, hysterics? I've seen more death than you could imagine. People dying of starvation all over the world. What do you think I started on research for? What puzzles me is how cool you are.
FORRESTER: I don't feel guilty if that's what you mean. I'm too busy working out what the implications are.
SMITHERS: Destroying the last year's work. That's what it means. And if that seems callous, well all right, it is. Farrow was pushed onto me and he was a nuisance and a fool. Always checking every minor detail. I've worked fifteen, sometimes sixteen hours a day, every day, on this experiment.
FORRESTER: Yes, I know.
SMITHERS: You don't know anything! All you care about is how much money you can make. Why did you have to kill him? Couldn't you have given him money, bought him off? Oh, what's the use.
FORRESTER: Look, Smithers, I know what you put into the experiment, but this doesn't mean the end of everything.
SMITHERS: Of course it does. You've ruined everything. It's all finished, wasted.
FORRESTER: Not necessarily. Farrow was going on a holiday. He has a boat. He was going to cross to France by himself in it. It's anchored about ten miles away.
SMITHERS: Yes, I know.
FORRESTER: If the police were to find an overturned boat and a body out at sea somewhere.
SMITHERS: But
FORRESTER: Don't worry. You can leave it all to me. I'll tow an outboard with me and come back in that.
SMITHERS: Well that's your business. I don't want to know about it.
FORRESTER: You say all I want out of the experiment is money, but you want something too, don't you. You want to see it finished, be known as the inventor of it. If the truth came out about Farrow, you can say goodbye to all that.
SMITHERS: The experiment must go through! It's too important! Nothing else matters! Not if we can save people from dying of starvation. That's what I care about, Forrester.
FORRESTER: All right, we'll move the body. As far as you're concerned, Farrow left here to go to his boat. I'll put his briefcase in the lab first.

[Laboratory bench]

(Forrester puts the briefcase down on the bench and leaves. Ian and Barbara stagger out)
IAN: Come on, Barbara. Let's get out of there before it moves again.
BARBARA: Oh, that was worse than the big dipper.
IAN: It was. We were lucky this case was full. Of course, it had to happen to us. Of all the places to pick, we had to choose one that was movable.
BARBARA: Have you any idea where we are?
IAN: It's a ceiling up there. That means we're indoors and the Doctor and Susan are outside. How's your ankle?
BARBARA: Oh, it's all right. I didn't hit it badly. Oh, I also bumped my knee against a large piece of metal.
IAN: Well, there were a lot of things flying around in there. We were very lucky.
BARBARA: Yes, but you know what the metal was?
IAN: What?
BARBARA: It sounds ridiculous. It was a paperclip.
IAN: Yes, well, the only thing to do is to keep out in the open. If we must hide, hide behind things.
BARBARA: Do you think we could find some water? I wouldn't mind bathing my ankle for a bit.
IAN: Yes, all right. I'll go and have a look over here.

[Patio]

FORRESTER: Let's move the body. Where can we put him?
SMITHERS: In the storeroom.
(they haul the body past the grating by the drainpipe where the Doctor and Susan are hiding)

[Drainpipe]

DOCTOR: They've gone.
SUSAN: It's much better when they're a long way away, isn't it.
DOCTOR: Are you sure you saw one of them pick up the briefcase and go into that building behind us?
SUSAN: Well, I definitely saw him pick up the briefcase. When he walked past us it was just like a mountain, just a blur, you know. He must have gone inside the house. Careful, Grandfather. Don't fall down there, will you.
DOCTOR: Phew. Awful smell of chemical in there. (the downspout)
SUSAN: Phew, yes. It's not just an ordinary drainpipe, is it.
DOCTOR: No. I wonder if that pipe extends into the room where that briefcase went.
SUSAN: Are you thinking of climbing up the inside of it?
DOCTOR: Yes, yes, of course, my dear. There's no other way. If you go in there you'll see it's all corroded, so there's plenty of hand and foot holds. That chemical smell means that it's germ-free.
SUSAN: It's too far for you, Grandfather.
DOCTOR: Well, if it is, I shall have to give up, and I'm not going to give up before I've tried. And remember, you must think of the other two. They must be constantly reminding themselves they're only one inch high. There's only the two of us to help them.
SUSAN: All right. But you let me go first.
DOCTOR: Yes, yes, yes, go on.

[Laboratory bench]

IAN: Nothing much that way, except what I took to be a gas tap. No water, though, Barbara. Sorry.
BARBARA: Oh, that's all right. Seems to be better now. I've a shocking bruise on my knee, though.
IAN: I wish I could do something to help you.
BARBARA: I think we ought to try in this direction.
IAN: Yes, well, it's the only one we haven't explored unless we go further afield.
BARBARA: Now, let's see.
(she tries putting her weight on her ankle)
IAN: All right?
BARBARA: Yes, that's fine.
IAN: Sure?
BARBARA: Right. Let's try that way.

[In the drainpipe]

SUSAN: Are you all right down there, Grandfather?
DOCTOR [OC]: Yes, I'm all right, my dear. I can manage very well.
SUSAN: Good. It's just as well this pipe's corroded, isn't it. There are plenty of footholds.
DOCTOR [OC]: Good. Well, onwards and upwards, my dear, eh?

[Laboratory bench]

IAN: Look at those enormous test tubes.
BARBARA: Ian, look at this.
IAN: Hmm? Yes.
(a pile of seeds)
BARBARA: What do you suppose it is? Corn? Wheat?
IAN: Wheat. Still haven't thought of a way of getting out of this place.
(she picks up a foot-long seed behind his back)
BARBARA: Oh, yes, you're right. It is wheat. Oh, it's all covered in some sticky stuff like toffee.
IAN: Hey, Barbara. Look at this.
BARBARA: Give me a handkerchief, will you?
IAN: Do you see what this is? A book of litmus papers. How often have I held a bit of litmus paper in my fingers. Oh well, makes a handy seat.
BARBARA: Yes.
IAN: You realise what this place is?
BARBARA: Oh, it's some sort of laboratory.
IAN: Yes. I think it must explain those dead insects and things. They must be doing some experiments. Of course, it makes it all the more dangerous for us.
BARBARA: Why do you say that?
IAN: Whatever killed those insects could easily kill us.
BARBARA: The Doctor said something like that. I'd forgotten.
IAN: Well, don't touch anything, eh?
BARBARA: But, but Ian.
IAN: I mean, look at the way these seeds are coated. They're obviously samples. Yes, I think they must be inventing a new insecticide and they've sprayed these seeds with it.
BARBARA: Surely, I mean, couldn't it be just preserving oil?
IAN: I doubt it. Anyway, you keep away from it. Got a very distinctive smell, that's one good thing.
BARBARA: I think we should find the others and get back to the ship.
IAN: Yes, I know. I've been wracking my brains. We're so high up here. Have you got any ideas?
BARBARA: No, I haven't. I wish I had.
IAN: Hey, Barbara, we can get back, you know.
BARBARA: Yes.
IAN: All we've got to do is find a piece of string and get down to ground level.
BARBARA: String would be too thick for us. What we really need is a reel of cotton. It's all so ridiculous, Ian.
IAN: Barbara, we must concentrate on getting back. Just forget how absurd things are. Concentrate on getting back. Do you understand?
BARBARA: Yes, all right.
IAN: Hey, that briefcase. Barbara, if we could find enough of those paperclips, we could string them together and make some sort of a ladder.
BARBARA: Yes, that's an idea.
IAN: Let's do it, hey? Come on, don't lets give up.
BARBARA: I'm not giving up.
IAN: Good, because the next problem is how to open the flap of the briefcase. I don't fancy struggling around there in the dark.
BARBARA: Oh yes, we might find something in the briefcase which would tell us more about that stuff. That insecticide or whatever it is.
IAN: Well, maybe, but the other things are much more important.

[In the drainpipe]

SUSAN [OC]: Are you sure you're all right, Grandfather?
DOCTOR: (breathless) Yes, I'm all right. I'm coming, my child. I'm coming.

[Laboratory bench]

(back at the briefcase)
BARBARA: Can you get the flap open?
IAN [OC]: I'm just going to try.
BARBARA: Can I help?
IAN [OC]: No, I'm all right. Just give me a moment to think this out.

[Briefcase lock]

(he tries pushing at the lock)
IAN: Well, it doesn't push downwards, that's sure.
BARBARA [OC]: Try right to left, then.
IAN: Great minds think alike.

[Laboratory bench]

IAN [OC]: No, doesn't move that way either. I'm going round the other side.
BARBARA: All right.
(a fly has landed behind her, unseen)

[Briefcase lock]

IAN: Ah, success! I've done it, Barbara. Barbara?

[Laboratory bench]

(Barbara is transfixed at the sight of the fly, then she faints. Ian arrives)
IAN: Barbara.
(the fly flies off, then there's another noise. Ian hauls Barbara over his shoulder and carries her away)

[Laboratory]

(the noise was the door opening. Forrester and Smithers enter)
SMITHERS: You don't have to watch everything I do.
FORRESTER: I like to know what's going on.
SMITHERS: There's blood on the flag stones. You don't seem to have noticed that.
FORRESTER: I shan't forget this, Smithers.
SMITHERS: Oh yes, you will. You'll forget all about it. Killing Farrow and whatever you do with the body, you'll rub it right out of your mind.
FORRESTER: Well, of course.
SMITHERS: And don't think I'm doing this for you. But if there's one chance in a million of the experiment going through, of making it work, then I must do it. I must.
FORRESTER: That's sensible, practical.
SMITHERS: Practical? It's very practical, making me an accessory.
FORRESTER: Making?
SMITHERS: Yes, making. You knew perfectly well how I felt about DN6, how much I'd put into it, how much it meant to me. You knew I'd help you. That's why you took me out and showed me Farrow's body, wasn't it. You'd do anything to get what you want, wouldn't you.
FORRESTER: Wouldn't you? Aren't you?
(they leave, and we look down into the sink, where an old man is lying exhausted next to the plug and plug hole)

[Sink]

SUSAN: Grandfather? Grandfather. Grandfather, we made it. We got to the top.
DOCTOR: Yes, I know. Just leave me for a minute. I shall be all right in a little while.
SUSAN: Come on.
DOCTOR: Oh, the smell of that chemical very nearly overpowered me.
SUSAN: Oh, yes. Grandfather, I think I heard some people talking just now. I heard a sort of low growling sound like Ian said, you know.
DOCTOR: Well, come to think of it, our voices sound rather odd. It's this sink, of course. It's all working like an echo chamber.
SUSAN: Yeah. I think we should try and find them, don't you? Do you think there's a chance of them being here somewhere?
DOCTOR: I don't know, child. I don't know.

[Laboratory bench]

(Barbara wakes with a start)
IAN: Take it easy.
BARBARA: Ian.
IAN: You all right? You gave me the fright of my life when I saw you lying there.
BARBARA: Did you see it?
IAN: The fly, you mean. Yes, I did. It flew off. It was frightened when those men came into the room.
BARBARA: I just turned around and there it was. Its whole body was quivering.
IAN: Well, don't worry about it now. It's all over. It's dead.
BARBARA: I thought you said it flew away.
IAN: It did, but it landed on those seeds. It died instantly.
BARBARA: Are you sure?
IAN: Well of course I'm sure.
BARBARA: I want to have a look.
IAN: Why?
BARBARA: It's all right, I'm all right now.
(the fly is very dead on top of the pile of seeds)
IAN: You can see the insecticide glistening on its legs. Pretty lethal stuff. That fly must have died the moment it landed.
BARBARA: Stop it. Stop it!
IAN: Barbara.
BARBARA: Ian
SUSAN [OC]: Ian! Barbara! Can you hear me?
IAN: Susan.
BARBARA: Susan? Where are you?
SUSAN [OC]: Can you hear me either of you?
BARBARA: It's coming from over there.
IAN: Yeah. What was it you wanted to say to me?
BARBARA: Oh, that's not important now. Listen, if Susan's found a way in, that means we can all get out.
IAN: I know.
SUSAN [OC] Ian! Barbara!
BARBARA: Why is her voice so loud?
IAN: I don't know. Coming from over here.

[Sink]

DOCTOR: You mustn't expect to hear their voices reply, my dear. This sink acts as a sound box. It's increasing the volume of your voice.
SUSAN: How far can we expect our voices to carry?  
DOCTOR: I don't know, I don't know, Susan.  
SUSAN: Well, if we shout very loudly would the people here hear us?
DOCTOR: No, no, Susan. No, our voices are much too high. It's a different frequency altogether, my child. Dog might be able to, perhaps, but, well, try it again.
SUSAN: Ian! Barbara!

[Edge of the sink]

IAN: There they are! Can you see them, Barbara? Doctor! Susan! We're up here!

[Sink]

SUSAN: Hey up there!
DOCTOR: What uncanny good luck.
SUSAN: Oh, Grandfather, we found them.
DOCTOR: Yes, I know, my dear. I know.

[Edge of the sink]

BARBARA: Did they really climb up that sink pipe?
IAN: They must have done. I wonder if we can get down it.
SUSAN [OC]: Climb down the plug chain to us.
IAN: Yes, all right, we will. About thirty feet or thereabouts. Do you think you can make it?
BARBARA: Yes, I'll make it somehow. It'll be worth it to see them again.
IAN: All right, let me go first.

[Sink]

DOCTOR: Good, he's started. Now the sooner we get out of here the better.
SUSAN: Can we climb down the pipe again, Grandfather? It was difficult coming up.
DOCTOR: Oh, it's a sure way back down to the garden, I do know that.
SUSAN: Oh, Barbara's started, look.

[Edge of the sink]

IAN: How are you doing?
BARBARA: Oh, all right. There's plenty to hold on to.
IAN: Good.

[Patio]

(Smithers and Forrester have been cleaning Farrow's blood off the stones)
FORRESTER: All right, let's go and get this muck off our hands.
SMITHERS: There's a sink in the lab.

[Sink]

DOCTOR: Listen. There's someone in the room! Someone's come back into that room.

[Edge of the sink]

IAN: Go on up! Move! Get out. Someone's here.

[Sink]

DOCTOR: Quick, down the sink again.
SUSAN: Oh, quick, Grandfather.
DOCTOR: Yes, come along.

[Laboratory]

SMITHERS: Look at this. That fly died instantly, the moment it landed on the seed.
FORRESTER: Which you sprayed with DN6.
SMITHERS: But this is wonderful. Think what would happen with locusts! DN6 will wipe them out.
FORRESTER: You don't have to keep on persuading me. I've seen the reports of every test you've made.
SMITHERS: But I can't see how Farrow hoped to get away with lying about the effects of DN6.
FORRESTER: He had us over a barrel. He'd written the report. Now don't keep on about it. All right, he was a fool. Thought he could get away with it.
SMITHERS: You were saying he'd written a report.
FORRESTER: Yes. It's in his briefcase. It'll have to go to his head of department, but with some slight amendments.
SMITHERS: Well, I don't want to know about that. I don't want to listen.
(and he puts the plug firmly in the plughole)

[Briefcase]

IAN: Barbara, he's standing at the sink. I can see him standing at the sink. He's turned the tap on!
(Smithers finishes washing his hands, and removes the plug. The water starts to drain away)

Episode Three - Crisis

[Briefcase]

IAN: The Doctor and Susan are still in that sink, Barbara, and he's turned the tap on.

[Pipe]

DOCTOR: Quickly, Susan, into the overflow pipe.
(Smithers pulls out the plug and the water rushes past them, then suddenly stops)
DOCTOR: They've put the plug back in again.
SUSAN: Oh, at least we're safe here.
DOCTOR: Yes, but if they fill that sink with any more water.
SUSAN: Yes, of course, it'll come in here, down the overflow pipe.
DOCTOR: Exactly.

[Laboratory bench]

(Barbara and Ian are by the pile of seeds)
IAN: I'm getting used to these sounds. I think that last one must have been the door closing.
BARBARA: Are you sure they have gone?
IAN: I'm not sure of anything, Barbara.
BARBARA: Ian. The Doctor and Susan, they must have been drowned.
IAN: We don't know. We must go and find out.

[Edge of the sink]

(Ian starts to climb down the chain)
IAN: Stay up there if you want to.
BARBARA: No, I'm coming with you.
IAN [OC]: You all right?
BARBARA: You go on.

[Sink]

(The plug is not in the plug hole. Ian peers down into the pipe, then Barbara arrives)
BARBARA: Anything?
IAN: No. Too dark to see. Afraid there's not much hope, Barbara.
BARBARA: What are we going to do? I mean, like this, what can we do?
SUSAN: I said they'd be all right, Grandfather.
(Susan and the Doctor climb out of the plug hole)
BARBARA: Susan!
IAN: I don't believe it!
DOCTOR: There you are, you see, my friends, you can't get rid of us as easy as all that.

[Study]

(Forrester is editing Farrow's report, while Smithers nervously smokes a cigarette)
FORRESTER: Yes, well, there we are. The report is ready.
SMITHERS: All right. Well, what are you doing now?
FORRESTER: The report itself isn't final enough. Farrow would have telephoned his department.
SMITHERS: But you can't do that! You'll give yourself away. They'll know it isn't him speaking.
FORRESTER: You leave this side of it to me.

[Switchboard]

HILDA: Strange Operator here. Hello? Yes, London, yes. Whitehall. WHI, yes.

[Study]

FORRESTER: Eight seven. Thank you.
SMITHERS: How do you know who to speak to?
FORRESTER: I've been dealing with these people for years.

[Switchboard]

HILDA: Two eight seven? Yes. Hold on. I have a call for you. Go ahead, please.

[Study]

(with a handkerchief draped over the mouthpiece of the telephone)
FORRESTER: Hello? Is Mister Whitmore there, please? Arnold Farrow speaking. Yes. Oh, hello, how are you? Good. I'll hold on. The secretary asked me how I was. Told you it'd be all right.

[Switchboard]

HILDA: Doesn't sound like Mister Farrow at all.

[Study]

FORRESTER: The tests are very satisfactory. I'm sending in the report. Yes, it is a bad line, isn't it. Well, I would say that DN6, as they call it, is about sixty percent improvement on normal insecticide. Yes, I know I'm not usually so enthusiastic, but this is really extraordinary. Crossing over to France tonight. And I'll send in the report. Will you send in the authorisation? Good. I'll tell Forrester. Yes. Goodbye.
SMITHERS: Well?
FORRESTER: Perfect. As soon as they get the report, we'll get the go-ahead.

[Laboratory bench]

(they come upon a notepad)
IAN: It certainly wasn't here before.
SUSAN: Half drawing and half writing. Ian, it's a formula.
IAN: Yes, I believe you're right, Susan.
BARBARA: Do you think it's the formula for the insecticide, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Perhaps.
BARBARA: Well, if it is, it'll tell us what we're fighting against. We might even find a cure.
IAN: A cure? What's the good of that?
BARBARA: I don't know.
IAN: No, neither do I. If we're going to do anything at all, we must stop it.
SUSAN: Yes, Ian's right, Barbara. You only need a cure if somebody's infected. What we've got to do is stop it being produced.
BARBARA: Yes, all right.
DOCTOR: Well I think we should take a closer look at this oversized document. The more we know about the enemy the better.
IAN: Those things up there are definitely molecular structures.
DOCTOR: Yes, you're quite right, my boy. I only wish I could see it more as a whole.
BARBARA: Couldn't we lever it up in some way, stand back and look at it?
SUSAN: Yes, it'd be like a huge advertising poster, wouldn't it.
IAN: I'm afraid it's far too heavy. We'd never lift it.
DOCTOR: Let me have the notebook, child. Now, we shall have to make a map of this. Now, Chesterton, you start marking off a section with your feet, will you?
IAN: Yes.
DOCTOR: And Susan and Barbara, I want you to call out to me what you see written beneath you.
(later, the Doctor is studying what he has written)
DOCTOR: Yes, yes. This is the insecticide quite clearly. It's a bit rough, of course, but it tells us the story.
IAN: Yes. I'm not very well up in this, Doctor, but isn't that phosphoric acid?
DOCTOR: This indicates the amount of organic esters.
IAN: Yes, and this is mineral nitrate. That's about as far as I go, I'm afraid.
DOCTOR: My dear boy, this formula's quite clear, look, with one vital difference. The inventor has made the insecticide everlasting.
SUSAN: That means it would seep into the soil.
IAN: Get into the drinking water.
BARBARA: What about human beings?
DOCTOR: Well, given in sufficient quantity, of course, it's capable of killing human beings.
BARBARA: Yes, if they drink and eat infected food and water.
DOCTOR: Yes, or even coming in contact with it.
IAN: Penetrating the skin to get into the blood stream.
BARBARA: Well then why do we go on just sitting here?
DOCTOR: Now, now, my dear. Gently, gently.
BARBARA: I'm sorry.
SUSAN: Barbara, are you all right?
BARBARA: Yes, I feel a bit giddy. I think I must be hungry.
DOCTOR: Yes, now there's another point to consider, my dear boy. Eating. We can't, even if we do find food here.
IAN: Yes, well, the less we talk about food the more I'll like it.
DOCTOR: We can go back to the sink, of course. The water in the tap is quite safe.
IAN: Well, no need for all of us to go. I'll go and fetch some.
DOCTOR: Ah, but I want to go into that direction. You see, there's something over there that might be the solution to all this business.
BARBARA: Well, what's that?
DOCTOR: A telephone, my dear.
IAN: Oh. Come on, then, let's go.

[At the telephone]

(It is an enormous black bakelite thing, with a proper dial and handset, and wires out the back of it into the wall)
IAN: Hmm, it's climbable.
DOCTOR: Yes. The thing is, my boy, how heavy is that receiver?
SUSAN: Grandfather, I think I've got just the thing. Look. We can push this underneath the receiver.
(It's a test tube cork)
BARBARA: Yes, there are lots more over there.
IAN: Hey, you all right?
BARBARA: Yes, I'm fine. I told you, I haven't eaten for ages. I think that's what it must be. Don't make a fuss.
IAN: Well, Susan, you and I'll do the climbing, eh?
SUSAN: Yes, all right.
(Ian picks up the cork and hands it to the Doctor)
IAN: And Doctor? Pass this up to Susan and she can then pass it on up to me.
DOCTOR: Very well.
IAN: Right, I'll get started.
SUSAN: Can you manage all right?
IAN [OC]: Yes, I can make it.
DOCTOR: Oh, er, oh, Barbara, would you mind bringing another one of these, please?
(he lifts the cork up to Susan)
DOCTOR: Got it?
(Barbara brings another cork)
DOCTOR: Ah, thank you, my dear. You look very tired.
BARBARA: Yes, I am a bit.
DOCTOR: Well, we can manage. You just sit down and rest for a while, hmm?
(the second cork is passed up the back of the telephone)

[Telephone handset]

IAN: Right, you'd better all come up now.
SUSAN [OC]: Coming. Grandfather? Barbara?
(Ian tries lifting the handset with his shoulders, but can't move it.
DOCTOR: You think that we three can manage, eh?
IAN: Why?
DOCTOR: Well, I don't think Barbara's quite up to it.
IAN: Oh, all right. Well, we can try.
BARBARA: It's all right. I'm here.
IAN: Ah, good. Now, listen. Susan, we're going to try and lift this end. Now you, when we get it lifted up, push this cork underneath.
SUSAN: All right.
IAN: All right?
SUSAN: Yes.
IAN: Now, you ready?
DOCTOR: Yes, yes, yes, yes.
IAN: Barbara?
BARBARA: Yes.
IAN: Right. Now, lift!
(they succeed)
DOCTOR: Quickly.
(Susan slides the cork in)
SUSAN: Oh, got it.
IAN: Okay, we'll try the other end now. Here we are. Same thing, Susan.
SUSAN: Right.
IAN: Ready now? Lift!
SUSAN: Right. Oh, we did it.

[Switchboard]

(and because the handset is off it's cradle, the local switchboard buzzes that someone wants to place a call)
BERT: Hilda, come and answer this thing. It's driving me mad.
HILDA: The old farmhouse again. Hello? What number do you want?

[Telephone handset]

ALL: (shouting) Can! You! Hear! Us!
(Barbara is listening at the other end, but only hearing a deep growl.
ALL: Put! Us! Through! To! Police!
IAN: Any luck?
BARBARA: No. No, nothing at all.
(Barbara collapses, exhausted)
IAN: We can't have failed after trying so hard.
DOCTOR: Yes, I'm afraid we have and it's my fault. I thought it was worth trying.
IAN: Well, we must try again.
SUSAN: Oh, Ian, I don't think it'll do any good.
IAN: Well we must try. I'll go and tell Barbara. Hey, you've been overdoing things.
BARBARA: Yes, yes, I think I have.
IAN: I'll go and get you some water. It'll freshen you up, okay?
BARBARA: Thank you.
(he reaches for the handkerchief)
BARBARA: What are you doing?
IAN: I want your handkerchief. I'll soak it in
BARBARA: No.
IAN: What's the matter?
BARBARA: You can't have it. You mustn't touch it.
IAN: Barbara?
BARBARA: No one must touch
(and she passes out)
SUSAN: Barbara!
(The Doctor picks up the handkerchief with his pen)
DOCTOR: There. The same aroma. Insecticide. You didn't eat or drink anything?
IAN: Well, no, certainly not.
DOCTOR: She's got insecticide on her hands. She touched it.
IAN: Well she never told me. I never saw her do this. I. She did borrow my handkerchief.
DOCTOR: Where were you then?
IAN: By that pile of seeds.
DOCTOR: Yes, you see, she got it on her hands. She rubbed it off on your handkerchief.
SUSAN: Oh, why didn't she tell us?
IAN: You can help her, can't you, Doctor?
SUSAN: Grandfather, we can do something, can't we?
BARBARA: What happened? Did I?
SUSAN: You fainted, that's all.
BARBARA: The insecticide. Is that why I feel like this?
DOCTOR: Yes. You've got some of it on your hands and you didn't tell us anything about it. It was very wrong of you, wasn't it.
BARBARA: Am I, am I?
DOCTOR: No, no, no, no, this little attack you've experienced is only temporary.
SUSAN: Take it easy. Come on, take it easy.
(Ian and the Doctor go to one side)
IAN: What can we do for her?
DOCTOR: Well, it's urgent that we get her back to her normal size, but at the moment her protective cells are too small to cope with the molecules of poison in her bloodstream. But if we can, that dosage of insecticide will be seventy time less dangerous. Practically nothing at all.
IAN: Are you sure?
DOCTOR: Yes, oh, quite sure. We must get her back to the ship.
IAN: What are we waiting for.
(back with Barbara and Susan)
IAN: How are you feeling?
BARBARA: Oh, a bit ropey. Could do with a glass of water.
IAN: We're going to take you back to the ship.
BARBARA: All right. Just give me a minute.
IAN: Come on, Barbara. Got a long way to go. You can get us back to normal size, can you?
DOCTOR: Oh, yes, of course I can, dear boy. Yes. Of course I can. (but he doesn't look so sure) I hope.

[Study]

(with the lab phone off the hook, Forrester can't make a call from this telephone)
FORRESTER: What the devil's wrong with this phone?

[Telephone handset]

IAN: Barbara, you're ill. You've got to let us take you back to the ship. You could die. Doctor, make her see some sense.
DOCTOR: There's nothing I can say, dear boy. Barbara's quite right.
IAN: Susan.
BARBARA: Ian, we must find a way to stop them. We must.

[Study]

FORRESTER: Any other phones around here?
SMITHERS: Oh, yes, there's one in the lab next to the sink.
FORRESTER: Maybe that's where the trouble is. Perhaps the phone's off the hook or something.
SMITHERS: Yes. I'll go and see. I want to have a look at Farrow's notes.
FORRESTER: Why?
(Smithers leaves and Forrester gets out his pistol, checking it still has a bullet in it)

[Laboratory bench]

DOCTOR: Yes, that's it. We'll cause trouble. Start a fire, my boy.
IAN: Yes. Can we start a big enough one to do any real damage?
DOCTOR: Well, we can try, anyway. There's nothing like a good fire, is there? IAN: What do you think, Barbara?
BARBARA: I think it's a good idea. If we could manage to start a fire it would certainly attract people here.
SUSAN: Yes! They'd find that man's body.
IAN: Yes. That's it.
(the gas tap to the bunsen burner) 
SUSAN: What?
IAN: If we could only turn it on.
SUSAN: Well then what?
IAN: I'll soon show you.
(rumble as the door opens)
SUSAN: Look out!
IAN: Quick! Behind this water tank.

[Laboratory]

FORRESTER: Who put these under the phone?
SMITHERS: DN6. It's DN6.
FORRESTER: Come on, I want an explanation. Why did you put these under the phone to stop me using it?
(but Smithers is frantically trying to wipe the sticky insecticide off his hands)
SMITHERS: Oh, that's not important now.
(the phone rings)
FORRESTER: Of course it's important.
SMITHERS: Will you listen to me?

[Switchboard]

HILDA: Oh, you've replaced your receiver now, have you, Mister Smithers?
FORRESTER [OC]: This isn't Mister Smithers. The extension was left off. I'm sorry.
HILDA: Is that Mister Farrow?

[Laboratory]

FORRESTER: Farrow? No.
HILDA [OC]: Oh, the other gentleman. I see. Only I've a call for Mister Farrow.
FORRESTER: Oh, er, just a minute.

[Switchboard]

BERT: Do you think you ought to be doing this, Hilda?
HILDA: Shh. Listen.

[Laboratory]

(Forrester puts his handkerchief over the mouthpiece)
FORRESTER: Farrow here. Who is this?

[Switchboard]

HILDA: You see? It's the same man.
BERT: Get him to talk a bit more.

[Laboratory]

HILDA [OC]: Mister Farrow, I've got a London call for you. Will you accept the charges?

[Switchboard]

FORRESTER [OC]: London? Oh, er, yes, er, all right.
HILDA: Hold on, please.
BERT: Hmm, yes, they do sound alike, I must say that. Perhaps I had better go up there.
HILDA: Hallo? Mister Farrow?

[Laboratory]

FORRESTER: Yes.
HILDA [OC]: I'm sorry, the number has broken the connection. Perhaps they'll call again.
FORRESTER: Oh, er, very well. Thank you.

[Switchboard]

HILDA: Bert, it's the same man. No doubt about it.
(Bert puts on his police helmet)
BERT: Well, we'll soon find out.
(Meanwhile, Smithers has a little dig in the garden, and is dismayed at what he finds)

[Gas tap]

SUSAN: Oh, I think it's moving a bit.
DOCTOR: Come on, all together.
(Barbara adds her weight to the end of the lever)
DOCTOR: It's coming.

[Matchbox]

(Ian is wrestling with a caber-sized match)
SUSAN: Ian, the tap's ready to turn on now.
IAN: Good. Now, Susan, I've wedged the matchbox against a knothole. What we're going to do is run at the side of it.
SUSAN: Like using a battering ram.
IAN: That's the idea. Come on, get hold of it. Right.

[Gas tap]

DOCTOR: Yes, I think that's got it in about the right angle, the gas jet.
BARBARA: Yes. Well, all we'll succeed in doing is just melting this tin.
DOCTOR: Oh, no, no, I've had a good look at this. This is pressurised. It's a spray can. Our problem will be to get away far enough when it explodes.
BARBARA: Explodes?
DOCTOR: Oh, yes, it's going to explode and when it does it'll go off just like, well, to us a thousand pound bomb.
(well, it does say Highly Flammable on the side)

[Garden]

SMITHERS: It's killed everything. Everything!
FORRESTER: Smithers.

[Gas tap]

(Ian and Susan try to strike the match)
DOCTOR: No, no, no, dear boy. Try hitting the box at a sharper angle. More force, more vim, hmm?

[Matchbox]

IAN: Doctor, have you ever tried to lift one of these things?
SUSAN: Come on, Ian. Let's try again. Charge!
(the match flares into life)

[Gas tap]

DOCTOR: Come on, let's light the gas jet. Turn it on.

[Matchbox]

IAN: Turn it down a bit. You don't want us burned alive. Doctor, Barbara, get behind that tap. Get behind, that's it. Ready, Susan? Now take it easy, eh? Please.
(they light the gas)

[Garden]

FORRESTER: And then he told me he couldn't authorise DN6. I had too much money sunk into it. I had to kill him. Once I'd started I had to see it through. All the way.

[Tank]

DOCTOR: Shan't be long now.
IAN: Take as much cover as you can. When that tin explodes there'll be metal flying all over the place.
SUSAN: It'll be just like that air raid, Grandfather. Do you remember?
DOCTOR: Yes, very well, and what infernal machines those Zeppelins were.

[Laboratory]

SMITHERS: Forrester, think what you're doing. DN6 is more deadly than radiation! Doesn't that mean anything to you?
FORRESTER: Get the briefcase.
(the insecticide can explodes. Forrester staggers back, blinded. Smithers gets his gun but then Bert the policeman takes it off him)

[Tank]

DOCTOR: It's worked! It's worked! Come on, all of you. Back to the ship. Susan, take care of Barbara. Quickly, quickly.
(the Doctor picks up a seed with his cloak)
IAN: Doctor, what are you doing? That thing's covered with poison.
DOCTOR: Yes, I know it is. I know all about it.
IAN: Well, what do you want it for?
DOCTOR: You'll be surprised. Go on, lead on.

[Laboratory]

BERT: He'll live. Now I have some questions that need answering and turn that gas off. You'll kill the lot of us.

[Tardis]

DOCTOR: Got to repeat exactly the things that happened to us when we landed.
IAN: Is there anything I can do?
DOCTOR: Yes. That seed over there, by the chair. Take it over to that table so that we can all see it. Wrap that round it when you do it.
(the Tardis dematerialises)
IAN: Doctor. Doctor, I
DOCTOR: Shh. I think it's working. Yes. Ha ha! I think it's working, my boy.
IAN: Doctor! Look at that seed.
(It's shrinking)
DOCTOR: Yes! Yes! We've done it! Yes! We've done it!
IAN: Doctor, it's incredible. That seed, it's completely vanished.
DOCTOR: No, no, my dear boy. No. Look, you see? It hasn't vanished at all.
SUSAN: Barbara?
BARBARA: Hmm, I'm so thirsty.
SUSAN: Here you are. Drink that.
BARBARA: Oh, I'd no idea water could taste so good.
DOCTOR: Well, well, here we are then. The patient is beginning to look her usual self again.
IAN: Thank you, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Not at all, my dear boy. Always at your service.
BARBARA: Doctor, what happened in the laboratory? I don't remember much after the explosion.
DOCTOR: Well, I'm happy to say our plan worked. We didn't have to fire the laboratory, but we did attract attention. Do you know, a policeman came into that room just as I was about to climb down that pipe.
BARBARA: Oh, good. Now, what about us. Can you get us back to normal?
DOCTOR: Yes. There's your answer, my dear.
(the grain of wheat in the palm of his hand)
SUSAN: Grandfather, is that the seed you brought in with you?
DOCTOR: The same seed.
BARBARA: Then we are back to normal!
DOCTOR: Completely, my dear. Now, before I get up and see where we are, I suggest you all go and have a good scrub, hmm? Off you go.
(Susan, Ian and Barbara leave, and the Doctor switches on the scanner. But it's just a mass of interference lines)
DOCTOR: Oh, dear, dear, dear, dear, dear. Now is that irritating. I had to repair that wretched thing and now look at it, I can't see a thing. Wait a moment. I think we're beginning to materialise. Perhaps I shall know now where we are.

Next episode - World's End

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