The Crusade

Original Airdate: 28 Mar, 1965

Transcribers note - episodes 2 and 4 only exist as audio recordings

Episode One - The Lion

[Wood]

(Two men with swords are walking carefully. When they have passed, two Saracens come out of hiding.)
EL AKIR: No, not yet. One of them may be the King. Follow them and listen to them.
(The Tardis materialises in the wood)
(Elsewhere, a falconer hoods a hawk.)
RICHARD: We are the only day and night for you, hunter.
DE MARUN: I wish that I were a hawk, sire, and Saladin my prey.
RICHARD: Now there's a subject for our troubadours and actors. Speak to the Chamberlain about it, I beg you, de Marun.
DE MARUN: I will, my lord. I will have the players call the entertainment, The Defeat of Saladin, the Sparrow of the East.
RICHARD: Well, it'll help us to pass these weary waiting nights at Jaffa. Here's a man devoted to his work.
DE TORNEBU: A beautiful thing, sire, but it has a stubborn streak. The clasp is faulty and needs hot fires to make it pliable.
RICHARD: Perhaps I should ride with craftsmen and leave my knights at home.
(The man with sword that we saw earlier arrives)
DES PREAUX: Your Majesty.
RICHARD: No, des Preaux, I will not fight today.
DE MARUN: Or do you mean to slay us all?
DE TORNEBU: And eat us for his dinner, from the look of him.
DES PREAUX: Sire, I've heard sounds in these woods.
DE MARUN: I've heard nothing.
DE TORNEBU: What sort of sounds?
RICHARD: Let the man speak!
DES PREAUX: I fear this wood, sire. You are too far from Jaffa and the Saracens too near.
RICHARD: Have you seen any?
DES PREAUX: No, but I sense them about us. This wood might have been designed for ambush.
RICHARD: What, des Preaux? Would you see danger in your own shadow?
DE TORNEBU: I have put the brothers de L'Etabe with the horses, sire, and all is ready for the return to Jaffa. If your Majesty desires to go.
RICHARD: We will stay here until, William the Wary, you recover your composure. And, I hope, your sense of humour.
(The Saracens watch from the bushes)

[Outside the Tardis]

IAN: I'll just take a look around.
DOCTOR: Yes, yes.
(Ian encounters an armed Saracen)
IAN: Barbara.
(Someone grabs Barbara from behind.)
DOCTOR: Good afternoon!
(The distraction enables Ian disarm and knock out the Saracen.)
DOCTOR: What is all this? Who is he? How did he attack you? Why did he attack you?
IAN: I don't know. I didn't stop to ask him.
VICKI: What's going on? Where are we?
Ian: Shh!
(Swordplay can be heard.)
IAN: Sounds to me as if he's got some friends.
DOCTOR: Come on. Give me a hand.
VICKI: But who is he?
DOCTOR: Come away, child. Dear me. Out of one trouble into another!
(They hide the unconscious Saracen.)
IAN: Barbara. Where's Barbara? Barbara!
(Barbara has been gagged and is being thoroughly tied up)
IAN [OC]: Barbara!
(The noise of fighting gets closer)
IAN: Someone's coming. Hide.
(The King is wounded. De Tornebu is shot by an arrow so the Doctor and Vicki haul him into the bushes. Then de Marun is also shot, allowing the King to fall near Ian.)
DES PREAUX: Saracens, I am the king! I am Malek Ric!
EL AKIR: No. You have no friends to protect you now, Malek Ric.
DES PREAUX: Am I to die as well? If so, dispatch me and have done with it.
EL AKIR: A king at liberty may give commands. A captured one obeys them. Take him! Find the others and kill them.
(The Saracens leave except one. Ian lures him away from Richard then lets a branch spring back into his face. Ian then uses a dropped sword to fight him)
(The Doctor checks on the wounded and has to fight another Saracen. De Tornebu saves him by throwing his sword into the Saracen.)
DOCTOR: It's all right, old chap, I have my friend here to thank for my life. Are you all right, dear boy?
IAN: Yes, I'm all right.
DOCTOR: That Saracen very nearly did for me. Of course. Did you hear what that man called him? Saracen. Malek Ric! Yes, that was the name the Saracens had for King Richard, Coeur de Lion. Malek Ric.
VICKI: So we're in the Holy Land? He's trying to say something. What
DOCTOR: Yes, he's got a very bad wound here.
DE TORNEBU: He was not the King.
VICKI: Not the King?
DE TORNEBU: The belt. Get the belt.
VICKI: This belt?
DOCTOR: This belt. Wait a minute. Of course, yes. I remember. This belongs to his royal master, King Richard. He'll certainly be glad to get this back again. We should be able to get into his favour. We shall need some assistance to help find Barbara.
IAN: We can't wait that long, Doctor. I'm going to have another look for her now.
DOCTOR: Be careful, my boy.
(Barbara is being hauled through the wood)
IAN [OC]: Barbara! Barbara!
(Richard gets up and staggers away)
(Later, Vicki is tending the wounded knight.)
DOCTOR: How is he, my dear? Did he take the drug I gave you?
VICKI: Yes, but I'm afraid he's unconscious again.
DOCTOR: Yes. Well, he should be better when we get him back to his own people.
(Ian enters.)
VICKI: Where have you been?
DOCTOR: Are you all right?
VICKI: You've been gone over an hour.
IAN: There's no sign of Barbara anywhere.
DOCTOR: Well, as I said before, we must try and get some help from King Richard. This certainly belongs to him.
IAN: I suppose you're right, but how are we going to set about it?
DOCTOR: Well, at the moment we can do nothing further until I find some clothes for all of us to wear, hmm? Yes. Now I think Vicki and I should go down into that city and see what we can find. Now, here, child. Put on this cloak, and it'll help to act as a disguise.
IAN: While you're gone, I'll gather some branches and make a stretcher for him.
DOCTOR: It's a good idea, but be careful. In the meantime, keep your eye on that.
(He gives Ian the belt.)
IAN: Oh, yeah.
DOCTOR: Come along, child.

[Prisoner's tent]

(Barbara and de Preaux are under heavy guard)
DES PREAUX: I will do you no harm.
BARBARA: Oh. Oh, thank heaven they've taken that gag away. Umm, I'm so thirsty.
(Des Preaux puts a cloak around her shoulders and gets her a dish of water.)
DES PREAUX: I do not know who you are, or how you came to be in the wood outside Jaffa. Your clothing is strange. It has caused some talk.
BARBARA: Thank you for the cloak. Oh, that's better. Where are we?
DES PREAUX: I am told we are at Ramlah.
BARBARA: Ramlah?
DES PREAUX: The great Sultan's encampment.
BARBARA: Oh, I see. What are we doing here?
DES PREAUX: As for you, I can make no guess. But I am King Richard, Coeur de Lion, leader of the mighty host, scourge of the infidel.
BARBARA: But I thought Richard had red hair.
DES PREAUX: Had? Still has if the ruse has worked.
BARBARA: Oh, then you
DES PREAUX: I am Sir William des Preaux, captured and mistaken for my King. Some smiles will turn to long faces soon, I have no doubt.
BARBARA: Yes, I heard the sound of fighting in the wood.
DES PREAUX: We were sadly outnumbered and taken by surprise.
BARBARA: What happened to the others in the wood?
DES PREAUX: I do not know. Maybe I shall never know. But I have a hopeful heart and, which is better, a lucky King. And you, who will not say her name.
BARBARA: Barbara.
DES PREAUX: Barbara. I would like to know how one so gentle puts herself among the swords and arrows. And your garments are a fashion in themselves.
BARBARA: Take me back to that wood, Sir William, and I'll answer all your questions.
DES PREAUX: You ask for the impossible very lightly.
BARBARA: Is it so impossible?
DES PREAUX: Today it is. But what am I to say of you to the heathen? How can I explain you to them?
BARBARA: Well, to them you're King Richard, so who would travel with Richard?
DES PREAUX: The Queen would not, but the Princess Yes, you shall be Joanna, my sister, and help me in my lies.
BARBARA: Very well. I seem to have gained a brother and a title.
DES PREAUX: And what is more, a friend.
BARBARA: I'm grateful for that.
DES PREAUX: Shh. Remember, you are Joanna.
(El Akir enters.)
EL AKIR: Yusef Salah ed-Din has commanded that all prisoners be treated with compassion. Would you say I have complied with his wishes?
DES PREAUX: The Sultan of Egypt and Syria would no doubt be pleased. But this lady, my sister
EL AKIR: Sister?
DES PREAUX: Aye. Joanna, Princess of England and closest to me in affection. My sister has been ill-treated, handled roughly by your men. Is this the compassion Saladin speaks of?
EL AKIR: Enough of your babbling. The woman is all of one piece.
DES PREAUX: Woman? Hold your tongue, Saracen!
(The guards restrain des Preaux.)
EL AKIR: We shall call her a prisoner, then. Does that sound better? You have no rights, no privileges, nothing except the benevolence of our leader. That you are the King's sister bodes well for me. I can serve both the Sultan and Malek el Adil.
DES PREAUX: Saphadin?
EL AKIR: As you call the Sultan's brother, yes. He will be pleased to see the woman he has so long admired. Let him go. He is a lion without claws.
(El Akir exits.)
BARBARA: Someone is going to have a very red face before long.
DES PREAUX: And an angry temper.

[Street]

(Traders shout out their wares to passers-by.)
DAHEER: Silks. Satins. Fine robes. Rich silks. Satins from Basra. Fine robes. Silks. Satins. The finest robes in Jaffa! Silks. Satins. Fine robes. Rich silks. Fine satins. The finest robes in Jaffa.
(The Doctor approaches.)
DAHEER: My lord. You are from Pisa, my lord?
DOCTOR: No.
DAHEER: Genoa, then?
DOCTOR: I know of the place well.
DAHEER: You are very cautious, you traders from Venice.
DOCTOR: I am not a Venetian, neither am I a trader.
DAHEER: Oh, your pardon, my lord. The richness of your cloak is hidden by the darkness.
DOCTOR: You have some very fine materials here.
DAHEER: The finest on the coast, my lord.
DOCTOR: Yes, that's what they all say.
DAHEER: Please, step into my humble shop.
(The Doctor and Daheer go into the shop as Vicki sneaks up and sits by the door.)

[Daheer's shop]

DOCTOR: Truly remarkable, all the colours of the rainbow. Ha, ha! Yes, it's truly Where did you say these wonderful materials came from?
DAHEER: Basra, my lord.
DOCTOR: Basra? Ah, most interesting.
(An English man enters the shop.)
DAHEER: Forgive me, my lord. Why can't you be more careful when you come here? Why can't you wait until the place is empty?
(Daheer looks through the bundle of clothes the man has brought him.)
THATCHER: They're all good, fine things. I want more than you paid last time.
DAHEER: Such clothes as these are difficult for me to sell.
THATCHER: Just give me my money.
DAHEER: I a afraid that I may sell them to the person you took them from.
THATCHER: A good price, that's all I ask.
DOCTOR: (sotto) Having been stolen once, they can be stolen again, or perhaps borrowed, shall we say, hmm?
(The Doctor ducks under a table while Daheer pays his supplier.)
THATCHER: Here, that's not enough. It was dangerous work getting them things. If I was caught, do you know what would happen? Do you know the King's punishment for thieves? I'd be shorn like a prizefighter and boiling pitch poured on me head. And as for you.
(From under the table, the Doctor snaffles a garment.)
DAHEER: You did get out of the palace without being seen?
THATCHER: Of course I did. Remember, I can go elsewhere next time.
DAHEER: And get less.
(The Doctor takes some boots then other garments.)
THATCHER: I couldn't get any less than what you give me. Blimey, it was hard word getting around the palace. I couldn't have done anything. I spend all my time trying to get this money and you do nothing.
DAHEER: As you paid nothing for them in the first place, you have done very well.
THATCHER: Bah!
(Thatcher leaves)
DAHEER: My lord? My lord? I was sure that he would buy from me. I could have sworn that he hadn't left.
(The Doctor ties a rope around a leg of the next table, then pulls and makes it collapse.)
DAHEER: No, my beautiful clothes! Oh, they're ruined, all covered in mud. My silks and satins. My embroidery from India. Oh, I am beset by devils! Oh!
(The Doctor throws the clothes and boots to Vicki.)
DOCTOR: Oh, my poor friend, what a misfortune. You've had an accident.
DAHEER: Am I not the most miserable of men.
DOCTOR: Oh, yes, you are, but I'm afraid I must leave you with your misfortune. But I shall return. Yes, I will return and you shall not be the loser by this business.
DAHEER: Oh please do. Please do, my lord.
DOCTOR: Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.
DAHEER: For what, my lord?
DOCTOR: Oh, for being here. For being here when you were most needed. Yes, yes. Goodbye.
DAHEER: Goodbye, my lord.
DOCTOR: Goodbye. And long live the Sultan.
DAHEER: Yes.

[Saladin's throne room]

SAPHADIN: Speak, El Akir.
EL AKIR: My lord, I bring good fortune. Not only for your ears, but for he who rules all of us as well.
SAPHADIN: My brother hears you as I do.
EL AKIR: I would see his face when I tell my story.
SAPHADIN: Be content that your voice is heard. If what you have to say pleases my brother, then you will see him.
(Saladin is sitting behind a curtain.)
EL AKIR: Know then that I, El Akir, have the instrument to vanquish the invaders from across the seas.
SAPHADIN: Indeed?
EL AKIR: I have taken two prisoners. One of them, the King of the English, Malek Ric.
SAPHADIN: Malek Ric? If you are speaking the truth.
(El Akir signals his guards to bring in des Preaux)
EL AKIR: The Lion is in our cage.
SAPHADIN: Good fortune indeed, El Akir.
EL AKIR: The other, a priceless stone I bring to lay before you as your heart desires. The sister of the Malek Ric, here for your command.
(Barbara enters.)
SAPHADIN: Princess Joanna.
EL AKIR: No less.
SAPHADIN: Less then less! Who is this creature? This rowdy jackal that yaps at my feet with tales of fortune and success?
EL AKIR: My lord.
SAPHADIN: You vile worm. Do you think I do not know the face and the form of the Princess? You take me for a fool?
EL AKIR: You tricked me!
(Saladin enters.)
SALADIN: Be silent. This is not King Richard.
EL AKIR: Not?
SALADIN: A blacker head of red-gold hair I never saw. You have the better bargain, brother. She may not be the Princess, but her beauty lights the room.
EL AKIR: My lord, I swear.
SALADIN: I do not wish to hear you. But I will listen to you.
DES PREAUX: I am William des Preaux, and to aid my King's escape, I shouted out his name and took his identity. This lady, your Highness, has no part in this matter but in aiding my pretence, and I beg you to look upon her kindly, whatever fate you have for me.
SALADIN: I salute your chivalry. All is now clear to me except the lady's presence.
EL AKIR: Great Sultan, this woman can be made to entertain you. I can have her dance on hot coals, run a gauntlet of sharp tipped swords.
DES PREAUX: No!
EL AKIR: Die for your pleasure.
SALADIN: What do you say to that?
BARBARA: It sounds like the punishment for a fool.
SALADIN: It does. And who here is the most foolish? El Akir, I can devise my own pleasures. Go with Sir William. Let me hear you have treated him like a brother. Let him have all the liberty except liberty itself.
(des Preaux, El Akir and guards leave.)
SALADIN: Are you afraid of me?
BARBARA: No.
SALADIN: You're not of these lands, yet you seem to be a stranger to Sir William.
BARBARA: I'm a traveller. I came with three friends. We arrived in the wood.
SALADIN: You rode into the wood?
BARBARA: No.
SAPHADIN: You walked into it?
BARBARA: Not that either.
SALADIN: You arrived?
BARBARA: Yes. In a box.
SAPHADIN: In a box? Ah, you were carried into the wood.
BARBARA: Yes.
SALADIN: Please talk. It helps me to consider what I have to do with you.
BARBARA: Well, I could say that I'm from another world, a world ruled by insects. And before that we were in Rome at the time of Nero. Before that we were in England, far, far into the future.
SALADIN: Now I understand, you and your friends, you are players, entertainers.
SAPHADIN: With little value in an exchange of prisoners with the English King, brother. This is a trivial affair. I do not know why you waste your time.
(Saphadin leaves.)
SALADIN: I cannot dispense life and death lightly. If Sir William is to be returned, he must make good report of our mercy. Perhaps that is the factor in your favour.
BARBARA: I don't believe you're as calculating as that.
SALADIN: Then learn more of me. You must serve my purpose or you have no purpose. Grace my table tonight in more suitable clothes. If your tales beguile me, you shall stay and entertain.
BARBARA: Like Scheherazade.
SALADIN: Over whose head hung sentence of death.

[Richard's throne room]

(The Doctor, Ian and Vicki in her new clothes watch as a servant tries to tend Richard's head wound with a poultice)
RICHARD: Right! Enough! This is the Devil's own embrocation. Continue.
DE TORNEBU: And so these kindly people, whose faces were like hidden in a mist until the moment passed, saved my life and brought me here.
RICHARD: Good friends, indeed. We thank you. The brothers de L'Etable are dead. de Marun dead. Sir Richard des Preaux taken. What have I left but one wounded friend and a sore head?
DOCTOR: One small thing remains yours, sire.
(The Doctor hands over the belt.)
RICHARD: Once again, I am in your debt. But I'd give this for de Marun and the others. My friends cut down about my ears or stolen. My armies roust about the streets and clutter up the streets of Jaffa with the garbage of their vices. And now I learn my brother John thirsts after power, drinking great draughts of it though it's not his to take. He's planning to usurp my crown, and trade with my enemy, Philip of France. Trade! A tragedy of fortunes and I am too much beset by them. A curse on this! A thousand curses!
IAN: We must ask him.
DOCTOR: I'm not sure this is the time.
VICKI: No, he doesn't seem in the best of moods, does he?
IAN: We can't wait for his moods.
DOCTOR: Gently, my boy, gently.
IAN: Your Majesty. There were four of us in that wood. One of our companions was a lady. She
RICHARD: Do not bother me with such things now.
IAN: I am asking you to send me with an escort to Saladin's headquarters.
RICHARD: And what do you do when you are there?
IAN: Arrange for the release of our friends.
RICHARD: As my emissary to Saladin?
IAN: Yes.
RICHARD: What, flatter him? Bring him presents in return?
DOCTOR: It would be of little use, a player king and a young woman, sire.
RICHARD: No.
IAN: I can bring them both back.
RICHARD: No.
IAN: Why not?
RICHARD: Are you deaf? We do not trade with Saladin today. Not today, nor tomorrow, nor any day henceforth.
DOCTOR: Our young friend is a woman, sire. Have pity. Let us help her.
VICKI: Please, your Majesty.
RICHARD: Understand this. This woman can rot in one of Saladin's prisons until her hair turns white before I'll trade with the man that killed my friends!

Episode Two - The Knight of Jaffa

[Richard's throne room].

DE TORNEBU: My lord, although we left a little of our pride back in the woods, there is some capital to be gained from the affair. Beside the violence and the tragedy, it has a humour.
RICHARD: Humour? Is he delirious?
DOCTOR: I think I know what he means, sire. Here Saladin, mighty ruler and commander of huge armies, believes he's captured you.
VICKI: You could turn this into a good story against Saladin.
DE TORNEBU: Look on the brighter side, my lord. A troop of men to capture one of your knights? Why, he'd need an army by itself and more to take your horse, or every man he has or more to take you prisoner.
DOCTOR: You could spread this tale by word of mouth and all the world would know that Saladin fears you.
VICKI: Sire, if you send to him and asked if he'd finished playing his game and could you have your knight back, it'll make him look such a fool.
RICHARD: There is a jest here, albeit a grim one with our friends dead. But Saladin must be just as much out of temper over this affair as we are.
DOCTOR: Your messenger might offer to exchange a hundred prisoners for the knight he holds.
RICHARD: We think we value Sir William highly. We do, but it would not be good to let Saladin know.
DOCTOR: He might think you undervalue his men. One hundred men to one of yours. Methinks a fair bargain, sire.
RICHARD: By my father's name, you have wit, old man. Guard, call the Chamberlain. We recognise the service you have rendered us and will be pleased to see you in our court.
DOCTOR: We are your servants, sire.
RICHARD: As to the sending of a messenger? Joanna.
(Princess Joanna enters.)
JOANNA: Brother, are you wounded?
RICHARD: Even my pride has been mended, sister. See these good people? Courage, loyalty, and wit are gathered here.
DE TORNEBU: Forgive me, my lady.
JOANNA: This man should be in his bed.
RICHARD: Yes. Chamberlain! Where are you?
CHAMBERLAIN [OC]: Coming, sire, coming.
RICHARD: Take this knight and see that he is well looked after and find places for these others. They have our patronage.
CHAMBERLAIN: Thatcher, guard, lend a hand.
VICKI: Be careful. Mind his shoulder.
IAN: We should carry him.
VICKI: Shall I help?
IAN: No, I think we can manage.
JOANNA: This is a young man?
DOCTOR: His voice has not yet broken, your Highness.
JOANNA: What is your name?
VICKI: Victor.
JOANNA: Do you sing songs or play an instrument?
VICKI: No. Nobody ever showed me.
JOANNA: We must do something about your clothes, at least.
DOCTOR: Your Highness. Come, Victor. Let us tend upon the others.
CHAMBERLAIN: Thank you, young man. You may leave him to us.

[Outside the throne room]

IAN: Giving him back his belt didn't help us very much.
DOCTOR: I certainly didn't like the way the Chamberlain examined Vicki's clothes. And come to think of it, they were originally stolen from here.
VICKI: Shh!

[Richard's throne room]

JOANNA: Strange people.
RICHARD: Good friends. And what is this? I have not seen this jewel before.
JOANNA: A gift from the man you fight.
RICHARD: Saladin?
JOANNA: His brother, Saphadin. Oh, I have given no cause for his attention.
RICHARD: Saladin sends me presents of fruit and snow when I am sick, and now his brother decorates you with his jewels. Yet with our armies do we both lock in deadly combat, watering the land with a rain of blood, and the noise of thunder is drowned in the shouts of dying men.
JOANNA: Your heart calls for England, Richard.
RICHARD: Aye, it does.
JOANNA: Is there no kind of peace with Saladin?
RICHARD: All wise men look for peace. The terms of peace make wise men look fools. I would have Ascalon, but Saladin fears that if he gives me that town then I will invade Egypt, and nothing I can say can make him change his mind. How this jewel radiates the light. So, Saphadin desires my sister.
JOANNA: But surely you and Saladin have some common meeting ground, Richard?
RICHARD: Joanna? Saphadin?

[Outside Saladin's throne room]

EL AKIR: Now take this and tell me where the woman is.
SHEYRAH: No.
EL AKIR: Then bring her to me.
SHEYRAH: No!
EL AKIR: Then deserve my displeasure.
SHEYRAH: My lord is greater than you.
EL AKIR: Where is she?
(Sheyrah gets away when Luigi enters)
LUIGI: She was a fool not to take the ring. But perhaps you were asking too much for it. Now I have something to ask of someone, if only I knew their price.
EL AKIR: I'm not bought by you, merchant.
LUIGI: You are an Emir, El Akir. What possessions of mine could possibly match those you already own? But I'm travelled from Tyre to speak with Saladin at Ramlah, a weary journey, and neither he nor his brother will receive me.
EL AKIR: It's nothing to me. I'm leaving Ramlah.
LUIGI: Do you return to your palace at Lydda?
EL AKIR: Yes.
LUIGI: Then what keeps you here? We both have reasons for being here, El Akir. Can we not help each other?
EL AKIR: And what is your reason, merchant?
LUIGI: Conrad of Tyre has sent an emissary here to make a treaty with your overlord. I come on his heels. Where there is a treaty there is a chance of profit. What lies unwanted on my ships at Tyre will find a home in Saladin. And from him I can buy and stock my ships again.
EL AKIR: And what is my part in this, merchant?
LUIGI: Arrange an audience with Saladin or his brother. But how will I repay such a favour?
EL AKIR: There is a woman here, an English woman. She made me look a fool. I shall take her to my palace at Lydda and then we shall see who the fool is, or the master.
LUIGI: A simple matter. Arrange my audience, then wait by the stables. I'll bring the woman to you.

[Barbara's tent]

SHEYRAH: Your lord will be dazzled with your beauty, my lady.
BARBARA: Thank you, Sheyrah.
SHEYRAH: Lady, I
BARBARA: What is it?
SHEYRAH: The whispers are about that you will tell a never-ending story.
BARBARA: Oh, yes. How did I get myself involved in this?
SHEYRAH: Be at peace, my lady. You only tremble at the honour of appearing before the great Sultan. I must tell you something, my lady. You have made an enemy. You must beware.
BARBARA: An enemy?
SHEYRAH: El Akir is planning I know not what, but he is an evil man.
BARBARA: How do you know this?
SHEYRAH: Already he has tried to buy my loyalty with precious stones. You must be cautious. Escape if you can.
BARBARA: El Akir? But surely Saladin
SHEYRAH: I cannot say more, my lady.
BARBARA: Sheyrah.
SHEYRAH: Please, my lady. I will fetch your shoes.
BARBARA: Escape? But how? A never-ending story. What am I going to do? Stories. Stories. Shakespeare! Yes, Romeo and Juliet. Hans Christian Andersen. Lilliput. Gulliver's Travels.
LUIGI: I am Luigi Ferrigo, merchant from Genoa. I have got a horse for you at the stables.
BARBARA: Did Sir William send you?
SHEYRAH [OC]: Which shoes shall I bring, my lady?
LUIGI: Sir William? Yes, yes, he sent me. Now please, hurry.
(Luigi takes Barbara away before Sheyrah re-enters)
SHEYRAH: My lady? My lady? 
(She notices a man's glove on the table)

[Stables]

BARBARA: Where is he?
LUIGI: We are almost there. Now please hurry, The man should be here.
EL AKIR: He is.
(El Akir puts his hand over Barbara's mouth)
EL AKIR: Your way is open to the Sultan's brother.

[Richard's palace - robing room]

IAN: Oh, I think this whole thing is ridiculous.
DOCTOR: You do, do you? Then I suggest we get along with it.
IAN: Why have I got to put this lot on?
DOCTOR: How should I know, dear fellow? If the King wants you to, surely that's good enough.
VICKI: Anyway, what are you complaining about? For all you know, it might give you a better chance to find Barbara.
DOCTOR: Never mind the mights, my dear, just concentrate on what you're doing. Here we are. Now I think just the sword and you're ready.
IAN: Ready for what??
DOCTOR: Oh, the King will tell you that. Do you know, my boy, I have an idea that King Richard still wants to send you to see Saladin after all.

[Richard's throne room]

RICHARD: (dictating to a cleric) And not only this kingdom, its towns and fortresses, shall be yours, but also the Frankish kingdom. Our sister, the Princess Joanna, whose beauty is already spoken of wherever men of judgement and discernment are, is a fit match for one who not only enjoys so grand. No, not grand, eminent. So eminent a brother as the Sultan Saladin but who also possesses an element of his own. Prince Saphadin, we beg you to prefer this match and thus make us your brother. Now, let me see. See it's delivered immediately.
(The Doctor, Ian and Vicki enter)
RICHARD: Ah, sirrah. Some business with you. Come closer.
DOCTOR: Your royal commands have been carried out, your Majesty.
RICHARD: Take this gold belt to the Sultan Saladin. Beg him to release Sir William des Preaux and your companion.
VICKI: Ian, how marvellous!
DOCTOR: You are very gracious, sire.
RICHARD: Do you wonder why I listen to your appeal?
DOCTOR: It is a king's prerogative to make yesterday's deafness today's keen hearing.
RICHARD: No more than that. Although we do not doubt that we are surrounded by loyal men, yet we fear that war is uppermost in their minds. Between ourselves, we plan a match between Joanna and Saphadin to bring peace. This is why we choose to send you rather than those who are closer to us. Bring back Sir William and your companion, but bring us hope as well. This blood-letting must stop!
IAN: May I leave at once, sir?
RICHARD: Is it love of peace or is it love of your companion that prompts this enthusiasm? Well, whatever the reason, may it speed you back to us. I have one duty to perform before you leave. Give me the sword, boy. You are without rank or title and while we do not doubt your courage, our emissary shall speak from a proper position of authority. What is your name?
IAN: Ian Chesterton.
RICHARD: Kneel.
IAN: But I
DOCTOR: Kneel, my boy. Kneel, kneel. Come along, come along.
RICHARD: In the name of God, Saint Michael, and Saint George, we dub you Sir Ian, Knight of Jaffa. Arise Sir Ian, and be valiant.
IAN: Your majesty.

[Richard's palace - robing room]

CHAMBERLAIN: With long white hair?
DAHEER: Yes, my lord, yes.
CHAMBERLAIN: A dark cloak which nearly brushes the ground?
DAHEER: The same, and if he has the articles you mentioned, then he stole them from me.
CHAMBERLAIN: Then we shall wait here for his return and face him with his infamy.

[Saladin's throne room]

LUIGI: Perfumes, materials from Baghdad, ivory, gold, spices. All these, Prince Saphadin, are now but a trickle because of this war.
SAPHADIN: My brother has not yet made any treaty with Conrad of Tyre.
LUIGI: I am a merchant, and hope I do no wrong in anticipating events, my lord.
SAPHADIN: You are seeking a concession?
LUIGI: I am, yes, sire. I am well-known for my proper dealings.
SAPHADIN: Yes, your reputation has flown ahead of you. Where there are transactions to be made, there will one find Master Ferrigo.
LUIGI: It is my calling, Prince Saphadin.
SAPHADIN: Well, help me judge another matter. and I may understand your mind a little better.
SALADIN: I will hear this.
SAPHADIN: Yes, brother.
SALADIN: This is a domestic matter only, but since it concerns a person nearer your way of thinking than ours, we welcome your advice.
(Sir William des Preaux enters with Sheyrah.)
SAPHADIN: A prisoner has escaped.
LUIGI: Indeed?
SALADIN: A woman, one I hoped might perhaps divert this court. I had reason to believe she was a teller of stories.
SAPHADIN: Speak!
SHEYRAH: Do not blame me!
SALADIN: Tell me what happened.
SHEYRAH: I do not know. I went to fetch her shoes, and when I returned she was gone. That's all I know.
SALADIN: And you, Sir William, know nothing of this affair?
DES PREAUX: Nothing, lord Saladin. I would not encourage a lady to venture out alone.
SALADIN: I believe you. Nor do I believe the woman would go by herself.
SAPHADIN: What is your opinion, merchant?
LUIGI: Er, this woman, er, had an accomplice perhaps? A companion who helped her, acted as her guide.
DES PREAUX: She was abducted. That is the only explanation.
SALADIN: Yes!
LUIGI: I see, of course. That is an explanation.
SAPHADIN: What else have you to say, woman?
SHEYRAH: You mean what I found?
SAPHADIN: Yes.
SHEYRAH: On the table I found a glove.
SALADIN: A man's glove?
SHEYRAH: Yes, my lord.
SALADIN: This glove?
SHEYRAH: Yes, lord.
SALADIN: It has a companion, Sir William.
(the glove tucked into Luigi's belt)
DES PREAUX: Where is she? What have you done with her?
LUIGI: I took her to El Akir.

[Richard's palace - corridor]

DOCTOR: I hope you will find Barbara safe and well, dear boy, er, Sir Ian.
VICKI: Good luck, Ian. Be as quick as you can.
IAN: I will, Vicki.
DOCTOR: Godspeed. And remember, be valiant.
(Ian leaves.)
DOCTOR: I almost wish I'd been knighted too.
VICKI: That'll be the day. Come on, let's go and tidy Ian's things.

[Richard's palace - robing room]

CHAMBERLAIN: I have been waiting to speak with you.
DOCTOR: Oh? Pray, what about?
DAHEER: Thief!
VICKI: I beg your pardon!
DOCTOR: What's this?
DAHEER: Visitor of sorrows, depriver of my children, robber of my goods.
DOCTOR: Who is this? Do you know?
VICKI: No. Oh, his face is a bit familiar.
CHAMBERLAIN: You stole some clothing.
DOCTOR: Really?
CHAMBERLAIN: You see this riding habit? It was taken from this very room. Now it is back here again.
DOCTOR: And a pretty poor garment, too.
CHAMBERLAIN: This and this, stolen from me.
DAHEER: And stolen from me.
DOCTOR: Yes, now there really is a point there, isn't there? If I stole from you, my lord Chamberlain, how could I steal from him?
DAHEER: You did. You did steal from me.
DOCTOR: Then how could I steal from him, eh, you blockhead?
CHAMBERLAIN: Please, please. Now, I had the clothes first.
DOCTOR: Oh, how nice for you.
DAHEER: And I had them second.
VICKI: Did you buy them?
DAHEER: Yes.
VICKI: From us?
DAHEER: No.
DOCTOR: Then whoever it was stole them from you must have sold them to you. Now, don't you agree?
CHAMBERLAIN: Er, yes.
THATCHER: My lord Chamberlain, a ship is in the harbour disgorging fruit from Acre.
DAHEER: That's the man. I bought them from him.
DOCTOR: He must have stolen them from you.
CHAMBERLAIN: Thatcher! You villain!
DOCTOR: Now, just a minute! Oh, my dear Chamberlain, so undignified. The merchant bought the clothes in good faith and paid for them in good money. Now please return his money.
CHAMBERLAIN: But I have to catch the thief.
DOCTOR: Now, now, now. You mustn't let an honest man suffer. Pay him!
CHAMBERLAIN: Doh! Thatcher! Thatcher!
DAHEER: Joy to you, my lord! Giver of life to my father, provider!
DOCTOR: Yes, off you go! Off you go! Well, we seem to have got out of that problem all right, hmm?

[Outside El Akir's palace]

EL AKIR: The woman tied to the horse. Bring her!
GUARD 1: Another one for El Akir's cage.
GUARD 2: I swear it to be the finest collection in Islam.
(Barbara manages to shove one guard into the other, and makes her escape)

[Saladin's palace]

IAN: Kidnapped?
DES PREAUX: Yes, Sir Ian, I fear so. Your rescue has come too late.
IAN: Well, who's taken her?
DES PREAUX: This Genoese merchant. He explained it away by saying that Barbara had conceived a passion for El Akir. Saladin and his brother accept the story, but I do not!
IAN: Well, of course not. It's a lie.
DES PREAUX: They could be as friendly as a hawk and a sparrow.
IAN: Where can I find El Akir?
DES PREAUX: He has returned to Lydda since falling out with Saladin.
IAN: Is Lydda very far away?
DES PREAUX: No, but it's El Akir's territory, where he has his men.
IAN: I'm going after her.
DES PREAUX: El Akir has an evil reputation. It's my belief he captured your companion as revenge, and in his eyes she would make a fine addition to his harem.

[Lydda - passageway]

(Barbara is making her getaway, and hiding from El Akir's men, when someone puts his hand over her mouth.)

Episode Three - The Wheel of Fortune

[Lydda - passageway]

(The man gestures Barbara to keep quiet, then moves her behind him. El Akir's men go past, and he knocks the second one, then the first when he returns.)
HAROUN: Two heads without the brains of one.
BARBARA: Thank you for helping me. Who are you?
HAROUN: I'm Haroun ed-Diin.
BARBARA: I'm Barbara.
HAROUN: We have a common enemy in El Akir. It makes for uncommon friendship. Come with me.
BARBARA: Where?
HAROUN: To a place of safety, come.

[Richard's palace - robing room]

(The Doctor is being suitably attired.)
VICKI: Oh, you look marvellous.
DAHEER: Marvellous indeed, my lord. The birds will envy you and the multi-coloured fish from the deeps are put to shame.
DOCTOR: All right, all right, don't get so carried away my friend. It's a fine cloak. You've done a very good job.
DAHEER: My lord is most gracious.
DOCTOR: Now the next question is, what could you do for my boy, hmm? I want something of finer quality.
DAHEER: Like yours, my lord? Then I can provide all the quality you need. Jewelled tunics with fur collars, ruby-studded belts, quilted sleeves, laced leather boots.
DOCTOR: Quite so, quite so, thank you, thank you. Now run away and have a good think about it, and let me know in the morning what you've decided.
DAHEER: I will, my lord. And when the sun rises I shall be here to transform the boy into a veritable strutting peacock. And then perhaps my lord will recommend the name of Ben Daheer to the King?
(He salaams and leaves.)
VICKI: Who's your friend?
(Joanna comes down the stairs and stands in the doorway)
VICKI: Anyway, why have I got to go on pretending to be a boy? Why can't I be a girl again?
DOCTOR: I'm sorry, my dear, but you known how we're placed here. It's, it's a, hmm?
JOANNA: Why have you deceived us?
DOCTOR: Oh, forgive me, your highness. This is my young ward. Having found ourselves in a hostile country I decided to use this disguise.
JOANNA: But we are not hostile. The open country, yes. Within reach of the merciless Saracen, yes. But here in Jaffa?
VICKI: Please, don't be angry with him. He only did what he thought was best for me.
JOANNA: A pretty advocate. Well, I won't be a partner to this deception, but while you are here you shall be in my company and be given my protection.
DOCTOR: We are indeed grateful, your Highness.
JOANNA: I saw the Chamberlain in the corridor. Bring him to me.
(Vicki leaves.)
JOANNA: You say you are grateful. I cannot command what I ask of you now nor will I, but I am in some quandary.
DOCTOR: Can I help you, madam?
JOANNA: I am my brother's favourite, yet now I find I am excluded from his confidence. I sense he's made a plan of which I am a part.
DOCTOR: May I ask, why, of all people here, you've come to me, hmm?
JOANNA: There's something new in you, yet something older than the sky itself. I sense that I can trust you.
DOCTOR: If there is a plan, my lady, I will find out what it is and keep close in touch, hmm?
JOANNA: Then I am satisfied.
(Vicki and the Chamberlain enter. We see he is similar in appearance to the Doctor.)
JOANNA: Ah, good Chamberlain.
CHAMBERLAIN: Your Highness.
JOANNA: Bid your servants go about the town and find nimble hands who will dress this child. Good weaving, well-spun cloth. The dresses shall be of silk and satins and brocaded stuff.
CHAMBERLAIN: Dresses? Silks? Satins? For the boy? I, I thought there was some amusement, your Highness?
JOANNA: Did you, Chamberlain?
(Joanna leaves.)
CHAMBERLAIN: I don't understand!
VICKI: It's perfectly simple. I'm a girl.
CHAMBERLAIN: A girl? Dressed as a boy? Is nothing understandable these days? The dresses, silk, satins. Where's the money to come from?
DOCTOR: The household purse, hmm?
(The Chamberlain leaves.)
VICKI: Thank goodness for that, I didn't really see myself as a veritable strutting peacock.
DOCTOR: Well, my dear, in one way I don't think things have turned out too badly after all, hmm?
VICKI: How do you mean, in one way?
DOCTOR: You will be much safer under Joanna's wing.
VICKI: I'll still see you, won't I?
DOCTOR: Of course, my child.
VICKI: I mean, Barbara's gone off, and then Ian.
DOCTOR: Only temporarily.
VICKI: You wouldn't go off and leave me, would you?
DOCTOR: What a question.
VICKI: I mean, your ship's the only home I've got now and I couldn't bear it if
DOCTOR: Ah, now, now, now. What is all this, eh, hmm?
VICKI: Well, when you said a good thing in one way I thought, well, I thought you meant that I was some sort of problem or something.
DOCTOR: Ah, surely you know me better than that, child? No, my reservation was that I might get entangled in court intrigue and that's going to be very, very dangerous. Very dangerous indeed.

[Haroun's house]

HAROUN: Safiya? Safiya.
SAFIYA: Father! I have been so frightened.
HAROUN: My poor house is yours, Barbara. This is my daughter, Safiya. Treat her as you would your closest cousin, child. Now, see to some food.
(Safiya leaves and Haroun checks the window)
HAROUN: The soldiers of El Akir were the searchers in the street. You must wait here until a quieter time.
BARBARA: I don't want to endanger you.
HAROUN: I am in constant danger. I have sworn to kill the Emir.
BARBARA: El Akir?
HAROUN: Yes. That vile and evil man. Last year my house was a fine and happy place. A gentle wife, a son who honoured and obeyed me, and two daughters who adorned whatever place they visited. Then El Akir came to Lydda and imposed his will. He desired my eldest daughter Maimuna, but I refused him.
BARBARA: So he took her?
HAROUN: Yes. When Safiya and I were away, he came and burned my house. My wife and son were put to the sword.
BARBARA: Then why do you stay in Lydda?
HAROUN: I live for one thing alone, the death of El Akir. Now I will go out and see if the way is clear for your escape.
BARBARA: No. Please. I just feel that I'm making things worse for you.
HAROUN: Rest here, I shall not be long. If danger threatens, Safiya will hide you. But if the soldiers persist in their search, and you think that they will find you, take this and use it.
BARBARA: Kill her?
HAROUN: Yes, and afterwards yourself.
BARBARA: No.
HAROUN: You must.
BARBARA: No. Life is better than this.
HAROUN: You do not know El Akir.
BARBARA: I couldn't do it. I
HAROUN: You would not let them take Safiya?
BARBARA: No, of course I wouldn't.
HAROUN: Then I'll leave the knife.
(Haroun leaves. Safiya returns and Barbara hides the knife.)
SAFIYA: Where has my father gone?
BARBARA: Oh, he, he went outside to see if the soldiers had gone.
SAFIYA: More likely to ask more questions of our neighbours.
BARBARA: Questions? I don't understand.
SAFIYA: My mother, my brother and my sister Maimuna disappeared last year. My father searches everywhere for them. We live in hope they will return one day.
BARBARA: Then you don't know where they are?
SAFIYA: No. It is a strange mystery. They've gone away and we must simply wait for their return. It is the will of Allah. You will eat? My father's knife!
BARBARA: Oh yes, he just left it behind.
SAFIYA: How strange. He never goes without it.

[Lydda - passageway]

(One of El Akir's men confronts Haroun, who cannot defend himself and ends up on the ground.)
WARRIOR: Who have you got there?
GUARD: I do not know, my lord. He was going to slay me.
WARRIOR: I seem to know that face.
GUARD: You cannot, my lord. He's a poor man of the town. He lives in the northern quarter.
WARRIOR: Have you searched there?
GUARD: A little, my lord. A den of thieves and beggars. Not wise to venture into such a place of squalor.
WARRIOR: The runaway can find a host of allies in the northern quarter, each individual as desperate as herself. Take what men you need and find her.

[Richard's throne room]

RICHARD: And when Sir Ian is returned we trust that he will bring your lady and Sir William des Preaux, in addition to the answers to the several letters we have written.
LEICESTER: Tell me your plan, sire. A new demand of Saladin? A battle plan? A victory like Arsuf?
RICHARD: Not this time, no, my lord of Leicester. No, we've had another thought. To give our sister's hand in marriage to Saphadin, brother of the Sultan, and so make an end to this war.
DOCTOR: I am indeed glad. sir, to know that you are thinking in terms of peace.
LEICESTER: The princess to marry Saphadin? My lord, I beg you to explain.
RICHARD: We do not feel obliged to explain anything to anyone, my lord of Leicester. We think our words were plain enough.
DOCTOR: It is a good scheme, sire, if the princess agrees.
RICHARD: Joanna knows nothing of this matter.
DOCTOR: Will she agree? 
RICHARD: You should rather ask how can she refuse? To stem the blood, bind up the wounds and give a host of men lives and futures? Oh, now there's a marriage contract to put sacrifice to shame and make a saint of any woman.
LEICESTER: Sire, with all the strength at my command I urge you, sire, to abandon this pretence of peace.
DOCTOR: Pretence, sir? Here's an opportunity to save the lives of many men and you do naught but turn it down without any kind of thought. What do you think you are doing?
LEICESTER: I speak as a soldier. Why are we here in this foreign land if not to fight? The Devil's horde, Saracen and Turk, posses Jerusalem and we will not wrest it from them with honeyed words.
DOCTOR: With swords, I suppose?
LEICESTER: Aye, with swords and lances, or the axe.
DOCTOR: You stupid butcher! Can you think of nothing else but killing, hmm?
LEICESTER: You're a man for talk, I can see that. You like a table and a ring of men. A parley here, arrangements there, but when you men of eloquence have stunned each other with your words, we, we the soldiers, have to face it out. On some half-started morning while you speakers lie abed, armies settle everything, giving sweat, sinewed bodies, aye, and life itself.
DOCTOR: I admire bravery and loyalty, sir. You have both of these. But, unfortunately you haven't any brain at all. I hate fools.
LEICESTER: A fool can match a coward any day.
RICHARD: Enough of this! You dare to flourish arms before your King? Know this, my lord of Leicester. We will not be advised. We have decided on a pact with Saladin. If that fails, then a trial of arms. But we have set our mind and heart upon this marriage, and it shall go forward.

[Saladin's throne room]

SAPHADIN: Why do you smile, brother? Is it a trap?
SALADIN: No. The English King writes sincerely. It is so guileless it can only be genuine.
SAPHADIN: Think seriously about it. Alliance with Joanna would give me title to much land. Power over far off countries. A glittering empire, brother!
SALADIN: I did not know you were so ambitious.
SAPHADIN: I would be the name, yours would be the voice.
SALADIN: Ah.
SAPHADIN: Of course.
SALADIN: Of course. Do not look so troubled. I will humour you and let this proposition go ahead. But listen to me well. Strategy is worth a hundred lances. Think brother, how does this proposed marriage help us to win our future battles?
SAPHADIN: You do not mean to think of this alliance seriously.
SALADIN: If you can marry with this sister of the English King then do so and I will help you to it. Go, write a letter. Say the idea pleases both of us.
SAPHADIN: But yet you doubt it.
SALADIN: Have England, France and all the rest come here to cheer a man and woman and a love match? No, this is a last appeal for peace from a weary man. So you write your letter and I'll alert the armies. Then on either day, the day of blissful union or the day of awful battle, we will be prepared.
SAPHADIN: You are wise. I was wrong to doubt you.
SALADIN: Hold one hand out in friendship but keep the other on your sword.
SAPHADIN: The knight, Sir Ian of Jaffa, who brought a plea for the release of Sir William.
SALADIN: Sir William I cannot return. Not yet. But write that he is well cared for. As for the other, Sir Ian, he begged to be allowed to search for the lady Barbara. The brave deserve their favours. Go, brother, write your letter. This sincerity deserves our honest dealings. But caution, yes, caution insists that my armies are ready.

[Haroun's house]

WOMAN [OC]: You pigs!
MAN [OC]: Watch your tongue woman, or we'll
BARBARA: They're getting nearer. Where's your hiding place?
MAN [OC]: Bring your torches.
WOMAN [OC]: Leave me alone!
MAN [OC]: Come here!
(Barbara and Safiya go into a secret room, then Safiya dashes out for Haroun's knife and goes back.)
WOMAN [OC}: Father! Let me go, you dogs, you pigs!
SAFIYA: In case we have to defend ourselves.
MAN [OC]: What, in that house? I'll get the others. Hassan, down here!
WOMAN [OC]: No, no, get away! (The warrior enters the house and looks around)
MAN [OC]: In the name of El Akir, open the door!
MAN 2 [OC]: Open up! Open up or we'll burn this place down!
WOMAN [OC]: Who are you?
(a second guard enters the house)
WARRIOR: Nothing in here, Look out there.
(In the kitchen, the guard takes some of the bread cooking on the pan.)
WARRIOR: Anything?
GUARD 2: No.
WARRIOR: Wait! (he picks up a small bowl) Still warm. No other window. Only one door. Look on the rooftop.
(The guard leaves.)
SAFIYA: They'll find us. Poor father!
WARRIOR: Nothing?
GUARD 2: No, nothing.
WARRIOR: Someone must be here, somewhere. Search every corner. No, wait. I've a better plan. Bring a torch. We'll smoke the secret out, or watch a burning funeral!
BARBARA: Here, cover yourself with this blanket and stay huddled in the corner.
SAFIYA: Why?
BARBARA: Never mind, just do as you're told. Take this.
(Barbara gives Safiya the knife and leaves the hiding place.)
MAN [OC]: Let's try down here.
WOMAN [OC]: Let me go, you dogs! You pigs!
(The warrior has his back to Barbara.)
MAN [OC]: Come on, let's try over in that house.
MAN 2 [OC]: Hassan, come here.
MAN [OC]: Get the others.
WOMAN [OC]: No, get away!
MAN [OC]: In the name of El Akir, open the door!
MAN 2 [OC]: Get yourselves down here. Hello?
(Barbara is caught by the guard who has been to the roof.)
WARRIOR: Where did you come from?
BARBARA: I was hiding in the shadows.
WARRIOR: Who hid you in this place?
BARBARA: No one. Oh, what does it matter, you've found me. That's what you wanted, wasn't it?
WARRIOR: When you're on your knees before my master, your defiance will change to screams for pity.

[Desert]

(Ian is sleeping when a bandit comes up to steal from him. He gets his sword, but Ian wakes when he reaches for the purse. There's a struggle, then someone hits Ian over the head.)
IBRAHIM: Thank you, my brother.

[Richard's throne room]

(Vicki is presented as a noble lady.)
JOANNA: Sweet child. You look so innocent. I have nothing but love for you.
VICKI: You've been very kind to me.
DOCTOR: We are both very grateful to you, your Highness.
JOANNA: You shall stay by my side and be my close companion. Your name is not Victor now.
VICKI: No, it's Vicki really.
JOANNA: Oh, I do not know it. Is it a Venetian name? Well, it doesn't matter. The eye should have contentment where it rests. Do you not agree, my lord of Leicester? Is she not beautiful?
LEICESTER: Indeed, madam. A fair rose of England in this foreign land.
JOANNA: Do you have news for me?
DOCTOR: I am afraid not, your Highness.
JOANNA: But you were with my brother. Did he tell you nothing of his plans?
DOCTOR: He said he wished to speak to you himself.
JOANNA: I thought I had your friendship.
DOCTOR: You have, your Highness, but the King spoke to me in confidence. I must not steal his thunder, hmm?
(Joanna leaves the Doctor and Vicki) 
DOCTOR: I thought something like this would happen, child.
VICKI: Can't you tell her?
DOCTOR: That she's going to get married? Of course not.
VICKI: But, can't you drop her a hint or something? She's furious. We can't afford to make an enemy of her.
DOCTOR: I have no desire to upset the King. Dear, dear, dear, all this intrigue. I knew it. All this trouble. Here comes the King.
(Richard enters.)
JOANNA: I would speak with my brother!
RICHARD: Oh?
JOANNA: What's this I hear? I can't believe it's true. Marriage to that heathenish man, that infidel?
RICHARD: We will give you reasons for it.
JOANNA: This unconsulted partner has no wish to marry. I am no sack of flour to be given in exchange.
RICHARD: It is expedient, the decision has been made.
JOANNA: Not by me, and never would be.
RICHARD: Joanna, please consider. The war is full of weary, wounded men. This marriage wants a little thought by you, that's all, then you'll see the right of it.
JOANNA: And how would you have me go to Saphadin? Bathed in oriental perfume, I suppose? Suppliant, tender and affectionate? Soft-eyed and trembling, eager with a thousand words of compliment and love? Well, I like a different way to meet the man I am to wed!
RICHARD: Well, if it's a meeting you want.
JOANNA: I do not want! I will not have it!
RICHARD: Joanna!

[Richard's palace - robing room]

RICHARD: Joanna! (to the Chamberlain) Get out. Get out! Joanna, I beg you to accept.
JOANNA: No!
RICHARD: I entreat you, Joanna.
JOANNA: No!
RICHARD: Very well. I am the King. We command you.
JOANNA: You cannot command this of me.
RICHARD: Cannot?
JOANNA: No. There is a higher authority than yours to which I answer.
RICHARD: I am the King. Where is there any man who has greater power over his subjects?
JOANNA: In Rome. His Holiness the Pope will not allow this marriage of mine to that infidel.
RICHARD: But, Joanna?

[Richard's throne room]

RICHARD: You defy me with the Pope!
JOANNA: No, you defy the world with your politics! The reason you and all your armies are here is the reason on my side. You are here to fight these dogs, defeat them. Marry me to them and you make a pact with the Devil. Force me to it and I'll turn the world we know into your enemy.
(Richard nearly hits her, and Joanna walks out with her head held high.)
RICHARD: Who gave away my plan?
DOCTOR: Your Majesty, if you believe that I
RICHARD: You are not welcome in our sight.

[El Akir's chamber]

(Barbara is dragged along the corridor by the guards and dumped on the floor in front of El Akir.)
BARBARA: Let go of me!
EL AKIR: The only pleasure left for you is death. And death is very far away.

Episode Four - The Warlords

[El Akir's chamber]

EL AKIR: Such a prize as you is worth rewarding these men for your recapture, would you not agree? I have spent time and trouble on you. Now you cost me gold as well.
BARBARA: I'm not afraid of you.
EL AKIR: No? Yet you run away. Is that not fear?
BARBARA: Fear has nothing to do with contempt. Or disgust.
EL AKIR: You are not here to like or dislike me. Such liberties are over for you. Look at these coins. Mere pieces of metal. No interest? You should have. These coins are going to change your laughter into tears, your joy to misery.
(Barbara knocks the coins out of El Akir's hand, distracting the guards. Then she pushes El Akir out of her way and runs.)
EL AKIR: Leave that! After her, you fools!
GUARD: The gold is mine!
EL AKIR: Dogs! Do you hear me, alert the palace!

[Seraglio]

(This area is reserved for women only. The guards burst in.)
MAIMUNA: What do you want in here? Are you both drunk? Or mad?
EL AKIR: I'll have your hands and feet for this. No man steps into this room but me. Now you find her, or your death will be slow.
(The guards leave.)
EL AKIR: A prisoner has escaped.
MAIMUNA: No one has stepped in here, my lord. No man would dare, except your guards just now.
EL AKIR: The prisoner is a woman, and I want her found.
MAIMUNA: We have seen no one.
EL AKIR: Look. A ruby ring for anyone who should see her and report it to me.
(El Akir leaves. The women part to reveal Barbara.)
MAIMUNA: Hafsa, run to the doors and let your ears warn us. We will hide you here. We all hate him.
BARBARA: Thank you.
MAIMUNA: You will be safe. No one here will betray you.

[Desert]

(Ian is staked out on the sand.)
IBRAHIM: You want a little drink of water?
IAN: Take me to Lydda. I will give you money.
IBRAHIM: I will fetch you money. You will tell me where I can find it.
IAN: I won't tell you anything until you undo these ropes.
IBRAHIM: It is a predicament. You are a rich lord, I can see from the things you wear, but you will not share your wealth with poor, poor Ibrahim.
IAN: I am not rich, I keep telling you. Take me to Lydda and you will be rewarded.
IBRAHIM: I am cursed with the affliction of disbelief, but I have another little scheme. A little pot of honey, made from pounded dates and very, very sweet. There, my lord, a little bit on your wrists and a little bit on your chest. Now, over there is a hungry home, full of ants that go wild for date honey. We must be generous to them. Lay a little trail across the sand, like this. And I will sit in the shade of the trees and dream of all the treasures I will get when the ants discover you. If you crane your neck around, my lord, you will soon see what you take to be a black line along the honey. Why, you will be able to see it getting closer and closer. My little ones! Such ecstasy!

[Richard's throne room]

VICKI: It is not true and you know it isn't!
LEICESTER: But what is true is that you came here in disguise. First a boy and now you are a girl.
VICKI: He was just trying to protect me!
LEICESTER: Protect you from the lord, the King?
VICKI: Oh! Where is the Princess? She knew all about this!
(The Doctor enters.)
DOCTOR: What is the meaning of this?
VICKI: He's had me brought here.
LEICESTER: I wish to question her.
DOCTOR: You call yourself a nobleman, sir, yet it appears you enjoy bullying young girls, hmm? We are not the guilty ones here, and don't look away when I'm talking to you. You, sir!
LEICESTER: I have the right to civility from you. What are you, knave or commoner? Or are you perhaps a traitor?
VICKI: You! It was you who told the Princess!
LEICESTER: I'll have no more of this!
RICHARD: No more will we.
DOCTOR: Your Majesty. I didn't realise you were there, sire.
RICHARD: Good Leicester, this question time has reached its full conclusion. Go to your men, find out their quarrels and complaints, and mend them with the best words at your command.
LEICESTER: They understand a fight, my lord.
RICHARD: Then warn them one approaches.
LEICESTER: Sire, I will. I'll turn them from a rabble into victors once again, and we shall set a noise of sharpening and polishing til the ground fare trembles with sound of axe and sword against the whetstone, and the sun shall find a glittering home in every visor.
RICHARD: Yes, do it.
(Leicester leaves.)
RICHARD: We know now that it was not you who told our sister. It's no use, Joanna is right. We cannot fight Rome as well. In any other land I could command the end and force my purpose. Not here. Not with Saphadin and Joanna. No, once again we shall have to fight.
DOCTOR: May I ask you something, sire? If you knew it was the Earl of Leicester that gave your marriage plans away to your sister, why didn't you accuse him, have it out with him then and there?
VICKI: You just let it go by without saying a word. It wasn't fair. I'm sorry, your Majesty.
RICHARD: We accept the impeachment. We are unjust to you to serve the greater good. You see, my Lord of Leicester is a hardy fighter, and a fight is near us now. When we meet the Saracen again, we shall need him at our elbow. But do not be discouraged. You have our favour.
DOCTOR: But I have made an enemy of him, sire.
RICHARD: Yes, I fear you have. Therefore, it would be best to be gone from here until the enmity is forgotten.
DOCTOR: I think I agree, sire.
VICKI: Must we go? I don't want to.
RICHARD: Good! And we do not wish to see you leave. But you must. Go to Acre. Rest there. Wait until we call again upon your wisdom and your counsel.
DOCTOR: We shall leave at once, sire.
RICHARD: Meantime, I'll wrestle with the problem of this war.
DOCTOR: There is something important, sire. If you are able to defeat Saladin in this battle, can you hold the city?
RICHARD: Win the battle, lose the war. The greatest fear we have. We've come so close. I must see Jerusalem. I must.
DOCTOR: You will, sire.
RICHARD: You think so?
DOCTOR: I am certain, sire. And when you look upon the city itself, you will be able to find the answer to the problem of this war. May we now take our leave, sire?
(Vicki and the Doctor move out of earshot of Richard.)
VICKI: Are we going back to the ship?
DOCTOR: As fast as our legs can carry us, my dear.
VICKI: Doctor, will he really see Jerusalem?
DOCTOR: Only from afar. He won't be able to capture it. Even now his armies are marching on a campaign that he can never win.
VICKI: That's terrible. Can't we tell him?
DOCTOR: I'm afraid not, my dear. No, history must take its course.
(The Doctor and Vicki leave.)
RICHARD: Help me, Holy Sepulchre. Help me.

[Desert]

IBRAHIM: You see, my master? The line of black is getting nearer and nearer. Date honey is a great delicacy for our little friends. And I will return to the shade and leave you to your little friends. You have only to call.

[Seraglio]

BARBARA: Don't be upset, please.
MAIMUNA: My tears are tears of joy. All this time I believed that my father and sister were dead. El Akir had swore that they were.
BARBARA: He has a lot to answer for.
MAIMUNA: Now I know why he told me they were dead. By keeping me here, he brought shame upon my family, and at first, I tried to kill myself to spare my father's honour. But when I believed him dead, I did not even have the will to die.
BARBARA: Listen, Maimuna, your father loves you. All he thinks about is getting you away from this place.
MAIMUNA: Is that really true?
BARBARA: Yes. He told me so.
MAIMUNA: I thought he had despised me.
BARBARA: He hates El Akir. He wants to kill him and take you home.
MAIMUNA: There is no escape from this place. But we will hide you. El Akir is a stupid animal. He will not think to search for you here.

[Richard's palace]

LEICESTER: You observed them leave the palace?
SOLDIER: Aye, just now my lord.
LEICESTER: Take men and follow them discreetly. The old man tried to poison the King's mind. He may be in the pay of the infidel Saladin. He may be worse. Some devil in a human form, the girl a witch.
SOLDIER: A witch, my lord?
LEICESTER: Take courage, man. No black art withstands a well-placed sword.

[Desert]

(Carrion birds circle, and the ants approach)
IBRAHIM: You see, my lord? They know when death is approaching. Already there's the advanced guard has reached its little objective.
(the ants have reached Ian's hand) 
IAN: All right. I'll tell you.
IBRAHIM: First! First! First!
IAN: I have gold.
IBRAHIM: Where? Speak up, speak up.
IAN: My boot.
IBRAHIM: Boot?
(Ibrahim cuts Ian's right foot free and takes the boot off.)
IBRAHIM: You are lying. There is nothing there.
IAN: The other boot.
(Ibrahim frees Ian's left foot, and Ian is able kick Ibrahim over and wrench his arms free. Both men struggle and Ian gets Ibrahim in an arm lock.)
IAN: Where is Lydda? How far is it, because you're going to take me there.
IBRAHIM: Not far. Walking distance. I live there myself. I'll show you. I'll take you. Do not kill me, lord. Walking distance.
IAN: Walking? Where's my horse?
IBRAHIM: My brother took it. A miserable thief.

[Seraglio]

MAIMUNA: Have you heard anything?
HAFSA: No. They must be somewhere else in the palace.
MAIMUNA: Have a rest, now, Hafsa. Let one of the others listen.
BARBARA: The corridor outside. Where does it lead?
MAIMUNA: To the balcony. It overlooks the garden.
BARBARA: How far up from the ground?
MAIMUNA: There is a tree, but
BARBARA: Can you reach it from the balcony?
MAIMUNA: There are guards below.
BARBARA: How far are the entrance gates from the tree?
MAIMUNA: Not far, but there is no escape that way. The guards watch it constantly. I'll show you from the window.
(The woman set to watch the corridor slips out unseen.)
(Meanwhile, Haroun lurks outside the palace gates)

[El Akir's palace - corridor]

EL AKIR: She cannot get out. Go and look again. You! Who gave you permission?
FATIMA: My lord.
EL AKIR: What is this insolence?
FATIMA: You said a ruby ring, my lord.
EL AKIR: Where is she?

[El Akir's palace - main gates]

(A guard lies on the ground)
IAN: He's dead.
IBRAHIM: Why do you steal his sword?
IAN: I'm going inside. El Akir has a friend of mine. I've got to find her.
IBRAHIM: El Akir will kill you. He's a very, very bad man.
IAN: He's not the only one around here. Why do you say he's a bad man?
IBRAHIM: He has made the rich people so poor so there is no one left to steal from. If you rid the world of him, you will be remembered as a saviour. I shall not betray you.
IAN: Oh, well in that case, perhaps you can do something for me.
IBRAHIM: Anything, my lord, anything, anything.
IAN: Yes, on second thoughts, it might be a little difficult for you. I wonder, do you think you could manage to, er, steal some horses for me?
IBRAHIM: Now you are truly, truly my brother. While you keep El Akir occupied, I will steal the horses from his stables.
IAN: Good.
IBRAHIM: You can always trust Ibrahim.

[Seraglio]

MAIMUNA: Fatima has betrayed us. You must get away. You will die if you stay here.
EL AKIR: You hid her from me!
BARBARA: Leave her alone!
EL AKIR: Now I shall show you how I deal with those who do not obey me!
(As El Akir raises his sword against Maimuna, he is stabbed in the back.)
MAIMUNA: Father! Oh, father! I believed you were dead.
HAROUN: There is great joy in my heart at seeing you. But come now. Your sister Safiya awaits you.
BARBARA: Is Safiya alright?
HAROUN: Yes. She told me of your sacrifice. I came here to give my life for you, my lady.
BARBARA: How did you get in here?
(Fatima enters and screams followed by Ian)
IAN: Barbara!
HAROUN: Get back! The guard!
(Haroun and Ian overpower a guard who rushes in.)
HAROUN: Quickly! Make haste. We must not stay here.
IAN: Barbara, quickly.
(Ian and Barbara leave. The other women gather around Fatima.)
FATIMA: No! No! No! No!

[El Akir's palace - main gates]

IBRAHIM: You see? I was right, my lord. You did have gold.
IAN: I acquired it.
IBRAHIM: Like I acquired the horses.
IAN: Yes.
IBRAHIM: Now you are my truly, truly brother.
BARBARA: Ian, we must get back to the ship.
IAN: Yes, alright. Farewell, Ibrahim. Don't go acquiring too many things.
HAROUN: Ride well, my brother. May Allah go with you.
(Ian and Barbara ride off.)
IBRAHIM: Really, such talent. He has such an honest face. We could have made a fortune.
HAROUN: We must not stand here dreaming, you half-wit. The soldiers will be around us.
IBRAHIM: This half-wit has stolen all their horses.
HAROUN: They can still use their legs, can't they?

[Wood]

(Night sounds, owls and crickets. Richard's soldiers stand guard between Vicki and the Doctor, and the Tardis a little way away.)
DOCTOR: They're between us and the ship.
VICKI: Are these the soldiers who followed us?
DOCTOR: Yes, they are. I wonder what they're up to?
VICKI: Can we go round?
DOCTOR: No, there's too many of them. Perhaps we can try? No, we can't do that.
VICKI: Why not? What's happening?
DOCTOR: Now I know why we've been followed.
LEICESTER: Your messenger arrived. So they are traitors and making toward Saladin's encampment.
SOLDIER: So it seemed to me, my lord.
LEICESTER: Armed as they are with secrets, they are dangerous enemies. Do you have the wood encircled?
SOLDIER: Yes. They can't get away.
LEICESTER: The shadows are the only friends they have. We'll find them at daybreak.
DOCTOR: It's that meddling fool, Leicester. We've got to try and slip through them. Remember, not a sound. Not a sound. In you go.
(Vicki gets to the Tardis.)
SOLDIER: Hold! Hold!
DOCTOR: Take your hands off me, sir! What are you doing? Unhand me! How dare you!
(Vicki and Barbara are outside the Tardis)
VICKI: They've caught him! They've caught him!
BARBARA: Vicki, it's all right. We'll get him away.
VICKI: But how? What can we do?
LEICESTER: So, I thought you'd show yourself.
DOCTOR: What is the meaning of this, sir? The King gave me leave to go.
LEICESTER: To Saladin?
IAN: You are right, my lord. His treachery is well-paid by Saladin. He is a Saracen spy.
LEICESTER: The truth at last. But I do not know you, sir.
IAN: I am Sir Ian, my lord, Knight of Jaffa. I know this villain's treachery, and hearing that you were looking for him, I followed you.
LEICESTER: To watch his execution?
IAN: No, my lord. To administer it.
LEICESTER: It is a paltry matter to be rid of him, but I would do it.
IAN: It is no paltry matter to me, my lord. Some friends of mind were ambushed here. De Marun, de Tornebu. He's to blame. My lord, I beg of you, let me finish him.
LEICESTER: Yours is the greater claim. Dispatch him then, and quickly.
DOCTOR: Gentlemen, since I am to depart so punctiliously, I would ask you to grant me one last wish.
LEICESTER: Granted.
DOCTOR: Thank you. I would like to look once more upon the city of Jaffa. Then you may do what you will with me.
LEICESTER: Granted.
DOCTOR: Thank you, my lord.
IAN: My lord.
(and they walk away from Leicester to the Tardis)
IAN: Hurry, Doctor, hurry!
DOCTOR: What about that performance?
BARBARA: Doctor, open the door!
(They all enter the Tardis)
SOLDIER: Shh! Do you hear a voice?
LEICESTER: A voice?
SOLDIER: A woman's voice.
LEICESTER: Have we been tricked?
(They get to the Tardis as it dematerialises. They cross themselves in fear.)
LEICESTER: We will not speak of this. Let this story die here in this wood or we'll be branded idiots, or liars. Poor Sir Ian, brave fellow. Spirited away by fiends. What dreadful anguish and despair he must be suffering now.

[Tardis]

IAN: Any more cracks about knighthood, and I'll carry out that execution.
DOCTOR: Well, my dear boy, I must say I think you've earned a good knight's sleep.
DOCTOR: Now, I suppose, the Tardis will materialise when it's ready.
BARBARA: Yes, and where it likes.
DOCTOR: Oh, my dear young woman, why don't you go have a cup of tea or something.
(The Tardis goes dark except for the control column.)
IAN: What's happening?
DOCTOR: I don't know.
(everyone stands motionless)

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