The Ambassadors of Death

Original Airdate: 21 Mar, 1970

Episode One

[Space Control]

(On the big wall screen, a man in a ribbed space suit is making fine adjustments to the path of a space capsule. His control unit is labelled Van Lyden.)
TALTALIAN [OC]: (French) And one degree. How are you reading?
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: I'm reading okay. One degree. Now. Manoeuvre completed.
CORNISH: You overshot, Charlie. Make a two second correction to port.
(It's Ronald Allen, again.)
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: Two second correction to port. Now. Error rectified.
CORNISH: You're doing fine, Charlie.
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: What is my distance from Mars Probe 7?
CORNISH: Distance computation, please.
TALTALIAN [OC]: Distance five eight zero miles. Seven minutes, three seconds to objective.
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: Confirmed.
CORNISH: Charlie, how's it going?
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: No problem. Everything's fine. No contact yet?
CORNISH: There's been no contact for seven months.
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: How do we know they're still alive?
CORNISH: They took off from Mars manually. They must have been alive then.
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: Something took off from Mars.
TALTALIAN: (bushy beard) How is it going?
CORNISH: They're closing. Charlie's a bit edgy.
TALTALIAN: Can you blame him? It is possible he has gone up to a rendezvous with a flying coffin.
BRIGADIER: Do you think they're dead?
CORNISH: In seven months space time, they could have fixed a defective radio.
TALTALIAN: If they are dead, it is going to turn public opinion against our space programme.
CORNISH: Frightened your computer grant might be cut, Bruno?
BRIGADIER: What are you going to tell the public? 
CORNISH: That's not my job.

[Space Control communications room]

(A man in a smart dark suit is sitting in a glass fronted room behind Cornish's desk, with a clear view of Van Lyden on the big screen at the front of the main control room. He speaks to the camera.)
WAKEFIELD: In a few minutes we shall know the answer to the question that has been occupying the minds of everyone here at Space Control since Mars Probe 7 took off on its return journey from the red planet nearly eight months ago. What has happened to astronauts Frank Michaels and Joe Lefee? Communications remained perfect on the long outward journey to the red planet and throughout the difficult landing. For a full twelve hours they sent back pictures and reports from the surface of Mars. Both then seemed in perfect health, then silence.

[UNIT Laboratory]

WAKEFIELD [on tv screen]: The world assumed that disaster had overtaken the mission. But when all hope was gone, radio astronomers at Cambridge reported that Mars Probe 7 had blasted off and was heading back to Earth.
(The Doctor turns the sound down and walks back to the Tardis console which has pride of place in his lab. He makes a few adjustments.)
LIZ: What are you doing?
DOCTOR: Well, I'm trying to reactivate the Tardis' Time Vector Generator.
LIZ: What's that supposed to do? 
DOCTOR: Well, it could sent you into the future, if it starts working again. Particularly if you're standing there.
LIZ: Come on now, Doctor.
(Liz dematerialises.)
DOCTOR: Liz! Good grief!
(He adjusts a control and dematerialises. Liz reappears.)
LIZ: Doctor? Where are you? Doctor?
(Liz dematerialises again and the Doctor appears. Another adjustment and Liz returns.)
DOCTOR: Oh, there you are.
LIZ: What happened?
DOCTOR: Well, we both got caught in the time warp field and were projected into the future.
LIZ: Into the future?
DOCTOR: Yes, but only about fifteen seconds.
LIZ: But I haven't been anywhere. You vanished.
DOCTOR: No, no, no. You vanished first. I only seemed to have vanished because you went into the future and I wasn't there yet.
LIZ: Yes.
DOCTOR: Yes.
(The Doctor flicks a switch and Liz grabs the console.)
DOCTOR: Oh. Wretched thing seems to have packed up again. Still, we're on the right lines.
LIZ: Doctor, I still don't understand.
DOCTOR: Look.
(The Doctor notices something on the television.)
DOCTOR: Good gracious. Lethbridge Stewart. What on Earth's he doing at Space Control?
LIZ: Well, something's happened to the Mars Probe.
DOCTOR: Oh, and the Brigadier thinks it's his business. Oh well, I suppose he's got to do something to occupy his mind now that he's blown up the Silurians.
(Liz turns up the volume.)
WAKEFIELD [OC]: You can see from the radar screen, that's the screen just to the left of Professor Cornish there, that the recovery capsule and Mars Probe 7 are on convergence. This is a tricky moment for controller Ralph Cornish and his team.
WAKEFIELD [on screen]: The two craft will be linking up in a moment or two.

[Space Control communications room]

WAKEFIELD: And then we shall know the answer to the mystery that has baffled the world's scientists for seven months.

[Space Control]

CORNISH: Charlie, do you have visual contact with the capsule yet?
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: Not yet. I'm changing attitude of capsule.
(The picture moves so Van Lyden is now upside down. What rot.)
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: I can see it. I'm up alongside.
CORNISH: Well done, Charlie. Everything looks good.
BRIGADIER: Ask him if it's definitely Mars Probe 7.
CORNISH: What?
BRIGADIER: Ask him.
CORNISH: Charlie, can you give us definite identification? It is Mars Probe 7.
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: No doubt about it. I can see the markings.
CORNISH: Fine. Do you hear anything from them?
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: Still nothing.
CORNISH: Try to contact once more before link up.
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: Okay.
CORNISH: Maybe their transmitter's too weak to reach us down here. 
VAN LYDEN [on screen]: Recovery 7 to Mars Probe. Do you read me? I'm about to initiate link up. Do you read me? Nothing, Ralph. I'm going to rotate for link up now. CORNISH: All right, Charlie. Go ahead.

[Recovery 7]

(The two capsules are of similar size.)
VAN LYDEN: Buffeting slightly. Firing port retro jets to compensate. Moving in for link up now.
(Recovery 7 puts its slightly larger nose cone over Mars Probe.)
VAN LYDEN: I have link up.
CORNISH [OC]: Well done, Charlie. Everything looks fine.
VAN LYDEN: Activating locking clamps now.

[UNIT Laboratory]

WAKEFIELD [OC]: Well, as you've just heard, Van Lyden has succeeded in achieving link up. A beautifully smooth
(Liz hands the Doctor a mug.)
LIZ: I thought you weren't interested?
WAKEFIELD [OC]: Operation in rather difficult circumstances.
DOCTOR: They've just linked up.
LIZ: Anything from the Mars Probe?
WAKEFIELD [OC]: The capsules were buffeting slightly just
DOCTOR: No, not a sound.
WAKEFIELD [OC]: However Van Lyden made it safely.
(The Doctor gives Liz the mug.)
LIZ: Thanks.
WAKEFIELD [OC]: This must be a moment

[Space Control]

CORNISH: All right, Charlie, talk us through.
VAN LYDEN [OC]: Injecting air into tunnel now.

[Recovery 7]

VAN LYDEN: Air injected into tunnel.
CORNISH [OC]: Is air holding?
VAN LYDEN: Air pressure in tunnel okay. Am moving to locking clamps.
(Van Lyden floats down to the airlock.)
VAN LYDEN: Releasing first clamp. First clamp away. Second clamp. I can hear something.

[Space Control]  

CORNISH: What is it, Charlie? What do you hear?

[Recovery 7]

VAN LYDEN: I think they're opening their hatch. Yes, it's them!

[Space Control]

VAN LYDEN [OC]: Second clamp away.

[Recovery 7]

VAN LYDEN: Third clamp. Fourth. Opening hatch.
(Van Lyden starts to float through the hatch, then a noise makes his face contort in fear.)

[Space Control]

(The noise comes down the comms and everyone covers their ears. Then it suddenly stops.)
CORNISH: Charlie, what's happened? Control to Recovery 7, do you read me? (nothing) Control to Recovery 7, do you read me?

[UNIT Laboratory]

LIZ: Doctor, what's the matter? What is it?
DOCTOR: That sound. I've heard it somewhere before.
LIZ: When?
DOCTOR: That's just it. I can't remember!
LIZ: What do you mean, can't remember?
DOCTOR: Don't you understand? It's all up here in my mind. The information's here, but I can't reach it. We'd better go there.
LIZ: Where?
DOCTOR: The Space Centre. It's not far.

[Space Control]

CORNISH: Control to Recovery 7, do you read me?
RUTHERFORD: (woman) They've run a complete check on all our circuits. There's no trouble this end.
BRIGADIER: Can you send up another recovery capsule to investigate?
CORNISH: Not immediately. Control to Recovery 7, do you read me?

[Space Control communications room]

WAKEFIELD: Doctor Taltalian, do you have any explanation for that sound we just heard?
TALTALIAN: At the moment, no. There is a possibility that it was some kind of static.
WAKEFIELD: Have you ever heard static like that before?
TALTALIAN: In space research, one is constantly encountering new and unexpected factors.
WAKEFIELD: But will you confirm that all radio contact has been lost with the recovery capsule?
TALTALIAN: For the time being, yes, but temporary loss of communication is not unusual. For instance, when the capsules go behind the moon
WAKEFIELD: But those two capsules are not behind the moon.
TALTALIAN: You can rest assured that everything possible is being done. Now, if you will excuse me.
(Taltalian leaves.)
WAKEFIELD: Well, as you see, there appears to be no apparent explanation for the sudden breakdown in communication and until the situation becomes clearer, the world must wait and hope.

[Space Control]

(Two cars drive into the tunnel that is the entrance to Space Control, which is inside a rock face, rather like a British NORAD or StarGate Command, but is actually the old cement works near Northfleet, Kent.)
CORNISH: Control to Recovery 7, do you read me?
BRIGADIER: Are they still holding the same position?
RUTHERFORD: Yes, they've kept on orbit.
BRIGADIER: Have you any idea what might have happened to Recovery 7?
CORNISH: Control to Recovery 7, do you read me?
RUTHERFORD: It could have been an excess of electricity in the Mars Probe solar batteries. If Lefee and Michaels died on take off from Mars, there'd be no one to control the power build up in the solar batteries.
BRIGADIER: And that would've affected Recovery on link up?
RUTHERFORD: When the capsules were joined the electric circuits linked automatically. Excess electricity in one could have blown all the circuits of the other.
CORNISH: Control to Recovery 7, do you read me?
BRIGADIER: Would that have killed the man in the Recovery capsule?
RUTHERFORD: Not necessarily. He might still be able to unlink and bring himself back, but without communications.
(A lift platform rises to the top of the stairs down into the control room proper. It's the Doctor and Liz. The Doctor shouts back down the shaft.)
DOCTOR: My dear fellow, I simply don't happen to have a pass! Because I don't believe in them, that's why.
(Two soldiers try to take the Doctor's arms.)
DOCTOR: Take your hands off me, sir. Ah, there you are.
BRIGADIER: It's all right. I can vouch for these people.
BRIGADIER: Doctor, what are you doing here?
DOCTOR: That sound. Have you heard it again?
BRIGADIER: No.
DOCTOR: You will.
LIZ: He says it's some kind of a message.
BRIGADIER: Well, who from?
DOCTOR: Have you got a recording of that message?
CORNISH: I've no time to talk to the Press.
DOCTOR: Quite right. Neither have I. Now, that sound, have you got a recording of it?
CORNISH: Everything here is recorded.
BRIGADIER: Doctor, everyone here's got a great deal to do.
DOCTOR: No, they haven't. There's nothing anybody can do for the time being.
CORNISH: Brigadier, who is this?
BRIGADIER: He's one of my associates.
CORNISH: Will you kindly get one of your associates out of here?
BRIGADIER: Come along, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Now you listen to me. That sound was some kind of a message, and it's going to be repeated.
CORNISH: Will you please get this man out of here? We're trying to save the lives of three astronauts.
DOCTOR: Nonsense, man. You're doing nothing of the sort. There's nothing you can possibly do
(The noise starts up again. Everyone else covers their ears but the Doctor concentrates hard for as long as it lasts.)
DOCTOR: High frequency accelerated impulses. Now then, I shall need multi copies of that recording, unlimited computer time and somewhere to work. Miss Shaw, I shall need your help.
CORNISH: How did you know that sound was going to be repeated?
DOCTOR: By exercising my intelligence. Now, since we didn't reply, the message would obviously be repeated. Now, we've got to break down that code and answer them.
CORNISH: Answer who?
DOCTOR: The man's a fool! How can I possibly tell who the message is from until I know what it says? Let me explain this to you in very simple terms.
BRIGADIER: He is trying to help, you know. You might find him quite useful.
DOCTOR: Might find me useful?
(The Brigadier takes the Doctor aside.)
BRIGADIER: I mean that you could help Professor Cornish. He is in charge here.
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, of course. Look, my dear fellow, do please forgive this intrusion, but you really must let me decode those messages. It could prove of vital importance to the safety of your astronauts.
CORNISH: I suppose we must try everything. But how you can be so sure
(Another noise blasts through the room briefly.)
CORNISH: It seems you're right. I'll see about that computer.
DOCTOR: No, not now.
CORNISH: Do you want to crack the code, send a reply?
DOCTOR: That was the reply. Brigadier, I shall need worldwide triangulation immediately.
BRIGADIER: But we know where the transmissions were coming from. The capsule in orbit.
DOCTOR: The first ones, yes, but not that last one. That was completely different. Now we've got to find out where that was coming from.
BRIGADIER: I'll get on to it.
CORNISH: But aren't we too late now?
DOCTOR: The message was repeated. Perhaps the reply will be. All we can do now is wait.
WAKEFIELD [OC]: The mystery of Mars Probe 7 has deepened. Seven and a half months of total silence and now these strange transmissions for which scientists here have no explanation.

[Space Control communications room]

WAKEFIELD: One theory is that it may be some kind of distress signal. As it is now some hours since the last signal from the capsules, it's difficult to see what can be done short of sending up another recovery craft.

[Space Control]

(On an upper walkway, the Brigadier is putting pins in a map of the world.)
BRIGADIER: That's Haystack.
DOCTOR: And Algonquin.
BRIGADIER: Algonquin.
DOCTOR: Arecibo.
BRIGADIER: Arecibo.
DOCTOR: Cambridge.
BRIGADIER: Cambridge.
TALTALIAN: I have computerised the factors involved in sending up a second recovery capsule.
CORNISH: What's the minimum time for blast off?
TALTALIAN: Ten days.
CORNISH: That's impossible.
BRIGADIER: Vorograd.
LIZ: Tokyo's just promised full cooperation.
DOCTOR: Oh, that's good.
BRIGADIER: Tokyo. Right, that about covers the lot.
DOCTOR: Well, if it's from Earth, this could give us the country, but that's not accurate enough. We must pinpoint the exact location.
BRIGADIER: Well, we've got every national radio service standing by with monitors. Wherever that signal's coming from, we'll find it.
TALTALIAN: Recovery 8 was not scheduled for lift off until three months from now.
CORNISH: They'll have to speed it up.
TALTALIAN: You know they've got problems with the new fuel injection system.
(The noise comes again, and radio telescopes start their search. Liz gets a report on a nearby phone.)
LIZ: From where? Nancy? Oui.
DOCTOR: Something coming through.
LIZ: Oui. Merci. From France.
BRIGADIER: Right.
(The Brigadier marks a location and presses a button. Three lines on the map cross at one point.)
DOCTOR: Yes. London.
CORNISH: Can't the Americans do anything?
TALTALIAN: I have checked. There is no capsule in go condition anywhere.
(The Doctor changes the wall map electronically but all he gets are the stars and the Moon.)
DOCTOR: Can I get a map of London on this thing?
CORNISH: A what?
DOCTOR: A map of London. It's very important.
CORNISH: That machine will give you surface maps of every surveyed planet, but a map of London? No.
DOCTOR: Useless gadgets.
BRIGADIER: Doctor, never mind the map. (into phone) Yes. Yes, fine. Yes, thank you. Goodbye. My people have just done a local triangulation.
DOCTOR: What's the exact location?
BRIGADIER: An abandoned warehouse seven miles from here.

[Warehouse office]

(Broken windows, paper blowing in the wind, two men with sophisticated communications apparatus.)
CARRINGTON: Run the message again. All the power you've got this time.
(Played by the prolific John Abineri, smartly dressed and with an ornate buttonhole. )
GREY: Full power, sir.
CARRINGTON: Have to risk it.
GREY: Right, sir.

[Warehouse yard]

(Three UNIT Land Rovers arrive.)
BRIGADIER: Out! A Section here. B section there. C section there!

[Warehouse office]

CARRINGTON: That's enough.
GREY: Do you think anyone's monitoring us, sir?
CARRINGTON: There's sure to be. Finding us is another matter.
(A man in a raincoat enters.)
COLLINSON: Sir, UNIT's outside.
CARRINGTON: That's very efficient of them. Keep them off as long as you can.
COLLINSON: Yes, sir.
CARRINGTON: Don't kill anyone unless absolutely necessary.

[Warehouse]

(Collinson and his men take up positions, and start firing as the Brigadier leads his men towards them.)
BRIGADIER: Take cover!

[Warehouse office]

CARRINGTON: Send the final transmission.
GREY: Have we time, sir?
CARRINGTON: The sergeant will hold them off.
GREY: Right, sir.

[Warehouse]

(Collinson shoots a soldier and the gunfight starts in earnest. A soldier breaks cover and gets shot. Another gets his rifle shot out of his hand. Collinson leads a group from their hiding place and the Brigadier leads some of his men out too.)
BRIGADIER: Follow!
(The Brigadier finally gets his eye in and shoots a couple of men. The fighting starts to go hand to hand.)
BRIGADIER: You can stop right there!
(Collinson turns. Both men have their pistols aimed at the other.)
BRIGADIER: Better put it down.
COLLINSON: You're probably right. 
BRIGADIER: You kill me, my men kill you. Pointless really.
(Behind Collinson, a UNIT soldier gets up and goes to a weight hanging from a chain.)
COLLINSON: Since you put it like that.
BRIGADIER: Right. Now!
(Collinson dodges the swinging weight and knocks the gun out of the Brigadier's hand as he makes for the staircase. Near the top he turns, then drops his gun and walks down again with his hands up in surrender.)
BRIGADIER: Right, take him.

[Warehouse office]

CARRINGTON: Trigger the self-destructor.
GREY: Right, sir.
CARRINGTON: Out you go.
GREY: Yes, sir.
(Grey starts to climb out of the window.)
GREY: Sir?
CARRINGTON: Coming.
BRIGADIER [OC]: All right, open up!
(Carrington fires three rounds into the floor then climbs out of the window. The Brigadier and two soldiers burst in and look around, then the transmitter goes Bang!)

[Space Control]

DOCTOR: Look, if I'm to help you people, I need full cooperation.
CORNISH: What's the trouble?
DOCTOR: I specified the need for computer time. If I'm to decode those messages, I need a computer.
CORNISH: Go and see Doctor Taltalian. That's his department.
DOCTOR: Yes, so he's just informed me. But he's being totally non-cooperative.
CORNISH: I'll talk to him.
(A flat screen rises out of the desk.)
CORNISH: I told you to give the Doctor full cooperation. See that he gets it.
TALTALIAN [on screen]: Yes, of course I will.
CORNISH: Satisfied? Now, if you'll excuse me?
DOCTOR: Yes.
(The Doctor walks away.)
RUTHERFORD: Houston have just called in. They can't raise them either.
CORNISH: Well, that's the least of our worries now. Athens have reported a solar flare build-up. A big one.
RUTHERFORD: Well, when do they expect it?
CORNISH: Anytime within the next twenty four hours.
RUTHERFORD: But they'll never survive solar flare radiation. You'll have to bring them down on remote control.
CORNISH: They're locked on manual. There's nothing we can do. Space control to Recovery 7, do you read me? Space Control to Recovery 7, do you read me? Athens has reported a dangerous solar flare build-up. It is imperative you unlock manual control so that we can bring you down.

[Recovery 7]

CORNISH [OC]: I repeat. We have a message from Athens Observatory. There is a massive solar flare building up. The flare is expected any time within the next twenty four hours. Space Control to Recovery 7, do you read me? Space Control to Recovery 7, do you read me?

[Space Control corridor]

DOCTOR: Let's see what he's got to say for himself this time.

[Space Control computer room]

(Taltalian is hiding behind the door as the Doctor and Liz enter with a large reel of magnetic tape. He slams the door shut and points a gun at them.)

Episode Two

[Space Control computer room]

TALTALIAN: I want that tape.
DOCTOR: Do you realise the importance of it?
TALTALIAN: Rather more than you, Doctor.
DOCTOR: So, you understood the message.
TALTALIAN: Hand it over.
DOCTOR: What are you going to do with it?
TALTALIAN: Doctor, give me that tape.
DOCTOR: Since you insist. (The Doctor holds out the reel, which disappears just before Taltalian can take it.)
TALTALIAN: This is no time for conjuring tricks. Put up your hands. Up!
(Taltalian searches the Doctor.)
TALTALIAN: Where is that tape?
LIZ: Perhaps he sent it into the future.
TALTALIAN: Doctor, are you trying to force me to shoot you?
(The Brigadier enters.)
BRIGADIER: Doctor, I think you
DOCTOR: Careful, Brigadier. He's frightened.
TALTALIAN: You. Come over here. Come here!
(Liz walks to Taltalian and he uses her as a shield.)
LIZ: No, stop, you're hurting
TALTALIAN: Be quiet! Don't try to follow me.
(Taltalian backs through the doorway, pushes Liz into the room and closes the door.)
BRIGADIER: I'll go after him.
DOCTOR: Yes, of course.
BRIGADIER: Guards!
DOCTOR: Are you all right?
LIZ: I'm quite unhurt. Taltalian
DOCTOR: I think we can safely leave him to the Brigadier.
LIZ: What did you do with the tape?
DOCTOR: What?
LIZ: The tape!
DOCTOR: Oh, the tape.
LIZ: Yes.
DOCTOR: Oh, here it is here.
(The Doctor holds out his hand and the tape appears.)
LIZ: You didn't send it into the future, did you?
DOCTOR: No, no, no. No, that was simply transmigration of object. There's a great deal of difference between that and pure science, you know. Now then, what about decoding this tape? Let me see now.
LIZ: That'll be the analogue digital converter.
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, that's just what I was looking for.
LIZ: Let me.
DOCTOR: Oh, thank you.
(As Liz laces up the tape, the Brigadier enters.)
BRIGADIER: He got away. This place is like a rabbit warren. I've set up a search.
DOCTOR: Brigadier, what did you find at the warehouse?
BRIGADIER: The transmitter.
DOCTOR: And?
BRIGADIER: We took several prisoners. One of them knows a great deal more than he's saying.
DOCTOR: Well, I'd like to have a talk with him.

[UNIT HQ cell]

(The Brigadier and the Doctor enter.)
BRIGADIER: All right, Corporal.
CHAMPION: Sir.
(Champion closes the door.)
BRIGADIER: Well, have you decided to talk yet? Why didn't you shoot me when you had the chance?
DOCTOR: Why don't you sit down, old chap?
(Collinson sits at the table.)
DOCTOR: Now, you were under orders not to harm the Brigadier, weren't you? Who gave you those orders?
COLLINSON: I can't answer any questions.
DOCTOR: Anything found on him?
BRIGADIER: No. His pockets were empty.
DOCTOR: Clothes?
BRIGADIER: The sort of thing you can buy anywhere, but all the labels were cut out.
DOCTOR: You've been very thorough, haven't you.
BRIGADIER: You're in very serious trouble, you know. I can hold you here on security charges for a very long time.
DOCTOR: Don't you realise that the men you are working with were seriously interfering with our space project, and thereby endangering the lives of three astronauts.
BRIGADIER: Look, I want answers from you, and I'm going to get them!
DOCTOR: Brigadier, you're wasting your time.
BRIGADIER: This man knows something.
DOCTOR: Yes, I know, but he's not going to tell us and I think we've got more important things to do.
BRIGADIER: All right. Corporal?
(Champion opens the door and the Brigadier leaves. The Doctor turns back on the threshold.)
DOCTOR: Looking after you all right, are they? Have you had a cup of tea?
COLLINSON: Yes, thanks.
DOCTOR: That's good. Stand to attention when you're talking to me and call me sir!
(Collinson leaps to his feet.)
COLLINSON: Sir!
DOCTOR: Just as I thought. Sergeant, aren't you?
(The Brigadier re-enters.)
BRIGADIER: A soldier. Are you a deserter?
DOCTOR: No, he's acting under orders.
CHAMPION: Sir, this just came.
(Champion gives the Brigadier a piece of paper.)
BRIGADIER: Oh, thank you. Doctor.

[Space Control communications room]

WAKEFIELD: There has been another extraordinary development in the mystery of Mars Probe 7. The two space capsules, Mars Probe 7 and Recovery 7, which have been locked together in radio silence, have now separated. But there is still no communication from Charles Van Lyden, nor from astronauts Michaels and Lefee.

[Space Control]

DOCTOR: Still no word from them?
CORNISH: Nothing. Space control to Recovery 7, do you read me?
MAN [OC]: Tracking report. Capsules now approximately seven miles apart.
RUTHERFORD: Eleven minutes from scheduled re-entry burn.
CORNISH: I wish I had your confidence.
MAN [OC]: Tracking report. Distance between capsule widening. Nine miles. Thirteen miles. Twenty five miles.
RUTHERFORD: It's started!
CORNISH: Ten minutes too soon. What's he think he's doing?
DOCTOR: Well, that's it for now. I'd better go and see how Liz is getting on with the decoding.
BRIGADIER: Don't you want to see what happens?
DOCTOR: No, no. No, if they're going to attempt a re-entry they must make at least one Earth's orbit. I'll be back in time for re-entry. Are you coming?
BRIGADIER: No, I'll run a security trace on our prisoner.
MAN [OC]: Tracking report. Recovery 7 speed now eighteen thousand miles per hour and increasing. Capsule will leave our radar range within three minutes. Closing to two point nine five.
CORNISH: Notify global tracking stations. Fix an open communications circuit. I want that capsule tracked every second.
(Outside the cell at UNIT HQ, Champion is bringing the prisoner a mug of tea when someone pokes a gun in his back. There is a clatter, then a gloved hand opens the cell door.)

[Space Control computer room]

DOCTOR: Yes. There's no pattern to it at all. It's nonsense!
DOBSON: Perhaps because we're feeding it nonsense. Maybe that sound from the capsule was just freak static.
DOCTOR: Yes.
LIZ: I wonder.
DOCTOR: Wonder what?
LIZ: Maybe there's a computer malfunction.
DOBSON: That's impossible. There's a self-checking mechanism.
LIZ: Well, even that could go wrong. I'll feed it a standard test programme.
DOCTOR: Never mind all that. Ask it what two and two make.
LIZ: What?
DOCTOR: Liz, ask it.
LIZ: Oh, all right.
DOBSON: This is ridiculous. I checked that machine this morning.
DOCTOR: How long have you known Doctor Taltalian?
DOBSON: Well, I've been his chief assistant for two years. I still can't believe all this.
LIZ: It says two and two make five.
DOCTOR: Oh, it's typical. I never did trust those stupid things.
LIZ: No, no, this isn't just malfunction. Taltalian must have sabotaged it.

[Space Control]

RUTHERFORD: Reappearance time this hemisphere ten seconds.
MAN: Tracking report from Massachusetts. Height one hundred miles. Speed twenty thousand and reducing. Eight, seven, six, five, four, three, two, one, zero. Capsule now in our tracking range and control range.
CORNISH: Main control, start transmitting now.
MAN: We have contact. We have contact.
RUTHERFORD: Transmitters on now.
CORNISH: It's not responding. Repeat transmission. Boost power.
MAN: Repeat transmission now.
CORNISH: It's no good.
MAN: Tracking report. Height ninety miles and reducing. Speed twenty thousand and holding.
BRIGADIER: It'll burn up.
RUTHERFORD: It's responding!
CORNISH: Recommence transmission and maintain.
MAN: Recommencing transmission now.
CORNISH: Fire retro jets, five seconds.
MAN: Retro jets, five seconds. Now.
RUTHERFORD: We have radar contact on screen now.
MAN: Tracking report. Height eighty five miles, still reducing. Speed eighteen thousand reducing to seventeen thousand. Sixteen thousand.
WAKEFIELD [OC]: Well, after what was a pretty rough re-entry by present day standards, astronauts Van Lyden, Michaels and Lefee will soon be experiencing the buffeting of Earth's atmosphere when their huge parachutes lower them on the last few miles of their descent.

[Space Control communications room]

WAKEFIELD: Under normal circumstances with two or three Earth orbits as a run up, Controller Cornish could bring them to within one hundred yards of their scheduled landing place. As it is, all we know is that the space capsule is about to land somewhere in the south of England.

[Space Control]

MAN: Drop speed now thirty miles an hour and reducing.
RUTHERFORD: Capsule drifting south southwest two degrees. Rate of drift, three knots.
(The capsules hurtle over southern Ireland.)
CORNISH: Ground level preparations completed?
BRIGADIER: The area will be cordoned off as soon as it lands.
CORNISH: Civil air routes warned? Airlines cleared?
RUTHERFORD: All planes have been diverted.
MAN: Drop speed now twenty two miles per hour reducing to eighteen. Height one mile. Drift rate three knots. Contact lost. Contact lost.
BRIGADIER: Something wrong?
DOCTOR: No, no. No, they always lose radar contact in the last few seconds.
RUTHERFORD: We've made it!
DOCTOR: Well done, old chap. Well done.
BRIGADIER: Yes. Congratulations, Controller. Wonderful job.
CORNISH: If they're alive.

[Landing site]

(The capsule is neatly upright on the heath surrounded by UNIT vehicles. The Doctor, Cornish and the Brigadier get out of a Land Rover. Cornish attaches a microphone to the capsule.)
CORNISH: Hello, Recovery 7, do you read me? This is Cornish. You are safe and landed. Open the hatch.
(Some way off, Carrington and Grey watch through binoculars.)
CORNISH: Hello, Recovery 7, do you read me? It's no use. Must be unconscious.
BRIGADIER: Better try opening it ourselves.
CORNISH: It's impossible. Either the mechanisms jammed or
DOCTOR: They've locked it from the inside?
BRIGADIER: Then we'll have to cut it open.
CORNISH: It's too dangerous for the astronauts.
BRIGADIER: Then what are we going to do?
DOCTOR: Take it back to the Space Centre?
BRIGADIER: Right.
CARRINGTON: Quick, the RT. UNIT's frequency.
BRIGADIER: Brigadier to UNIT control, Brigadier to UNIT Control. UNIT Control, I want a route cleared from here to the Space Centre. Outriders, top priority.
(Grey has listened to this on headphones and written it down.)
GREY: Sir.
CARRINGTON: Excellent. It couldn't be better.
CORNISH: By the time you get the capsule back to the Space Centre, I'll have everything ready.
BRIGADIER: I'll go with the capsule.
(The capsule is being hoisted onto a low loader. The Doctor is under Bessie's bonnet again.)
BRIGADIER: See you at the Space Centre.
DOCTOR: All right.
BRIGADIER: If you make it. I'll go with you. Keep to the prepared route and clear the away ahead of us. You bring up the rear.
(The low-loader crawls away. Bessie starts up, begins to turn around and stops again. She gets going again when the convoy is some way away. A helicopter swoops low and drops smoke grenades in front of the convoy. It halts, the helicopter lands and two men use alien weapons on the motorcycle outriders as it flies off again to keep buzzing the area. The Brigadier tries to shoot one of them but is knocked out by the weapon too. The lowloader is captured and driven away while a UNIT soldier manages to get onto the helicopter and tries to force open the door. He is knocked off. The Brigadier stands up to watch the capsule disappearing in the distance. The men driving it are revealed to be Carrington and Grey. Meanwhile, Bessie is bumping down the road when the Doctor sees the lowloader coming towards him. He parks Bessie in the middle of the track, forcing them to stop. Grey totally fails to recognise him.)
GREY: Get out of the way, please.
DOCTOR: I'm afraid I can't.
GREY: Will you please get out of the way, sir? We're carrying a very important cargo.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, if you want me to get out of the way, I'm afraid you'll have to help me. Old Bessie seems to have stopped.
(Grey and Carrington get out of the cab to push Bessie.)
DOCTOR: Ready? I'll let the brake off. Right, push.
(They push Bessie to the side of the track, then the Doctor flicks the 'Anti Theft' switch on the dashboard. Grey and Carrington's hands are stuck to Bessie.)
DOCTOR: Thank you very much! Don't worry, it'll switch itself off. Eventually.
(The Doctor drives off in the lowloader.)

[Space Control corridor]

CORNISH: Helicopter and smoke bombs?
BRIGADIER: Yes, they were very well organised. We lost the capsule and the Doctor's vanished.
(The corridor leads straight into -)

[Space Control hangar]

BRIGADIER: How on earth?
(The Recovery 7 capsule is hanging in the middle of the area, with technicians working on it.)
DOCTOR: I brought it here.
BRIGADIER: Doctor! Thank heavens you're all right. We found the car. Thought they'd got you.
DOCTOR: Didn't you find two angry men stuck to my car?
BRIGADIER: No, just the car.
DOCTOR: Can't have got that force field strong enough yet.
(A phone rings.)
CORNISH: Cornish? Yes. Doctor, it's for you.
DOCTOR: Thank you. Hello? Yes, Liz. Yes, right. I'll be down straight away. I'll tell you all about it later. Liz thinks she's on to something.
(The Doctor leaves.)
BRIGADIER: Will you be able to make contact?
CORNISH: I'm not sure. The equipment's being connected now.

[Space Control computer room]

(The Doctor is looking at a printout.)
DOCTOR: You're right, Liz. This is a definite attempt at pictographic communication.
DOBSON: Could be just random patterns.
DOCTOR: What, with this symbol repeated twice? And this one repeated four times? Oh, no.
LIZ: Who in the world would want to send a message in this form?
DOCTOR: No one on this world, but an alien intelligence so different this is the only way they can communicate.
LIZ: Doctor, you don't think that this intelligence
DOCTOR: I think that it's high time the Brigadier and I had a talk to the top man.
(The Doctor and Liz leave. Dobson picks up a phone and dials three digits.)
DOBSON: Dobson here. They've started to crack the code.

[Quinlan's office]

(The top man in a Civil Servant.)
QUINLAN: Exactly what are you suggesting?
DOCTOR: I should have thought that was obvious. Every step we take, someone's ahead of us.
BRIGADIER: Yes. Doctor Taltalian, for instance. I've got his file here. Checked and double checked like everyone else working on this project, and yet he sabotages his own computer, draws a gun on the Doctor and then runs away like a criminal.
QUINLAN: Well, it's extraordinary. I've known Bruno Taltalian for years.
DOCTOR: Look, that is quite beside the point. The question is, who else is involved?
QUINLAN: I can see your reasons for concern but you have got the capsule back now.
DOCTOR: Oh, yes, we've got the capsule back all right, and it's safely installed at the Space Centre. But the astronauts still refuse to come out.
QUINLAN: Well, I shall initiate a top level investigation immediately, Brigadier.
BRIGADIER: With respect
QUINLAN: Now I'm sure you'll want to get back to the Space Centre.
DOCTOR: Is that all you've got to say, Sir James? Sweep it all under the carpet?
BRIGADIER: Come on, Doctor. I'll keep you informed, sir.
QUINLAN: I should be most grateful, Brigadier. Thank you, gentlemen.
(The Brigadier and Doctor leave. Quinlan goes to another door opposite.)
QUINLAN: All right. Won't you sit down?
(Taltalian does so.)

[Space Control hangar]

LIZ: Recovery 7, do you read me?
DOCTOR: Any response yet?
CORNISH: Nothing.
LIZ: Recovery 7, do you read me?
BRIGADIER: Well, I suggest we cut it open.
CORNISH: I've got men with thermal lances standing by.
(Static comes over the speakers.)
LIZ: I think I'm getting something.

[Quinlan's office]

TALTALIAN: They have got the capsule. What went wrong?
QUINLAN: I don't know yet. They've started to crack the code, too.
TALTALIAN: What are you going to do about UNIT?
QUINLAN: It's already been dealt with. They've got quite a surprise coming.

[Space Control hangar]

LIZ: Hello Recovery 7, do you read me? Hello Recovery 7, do you read me?
VAN LYDEN [OC]: Hello, Space Control. This is Recovery 7. Will you clear us for re-entry?
CORNISH: Charlie! This is Ralph Cornish. You are back at Space Control. Open the capsule.
VAN LYDEN [OC]: We are not cleared for re-entry.
CORNISH: Charlie? You are back at Space Control. What's wrong? Open the hatch.
VAN LYDEN [OC]: Hello, Space Control. This is Recovery 7. Will you clear us for re-entry?
DOCTOR: Let me try. Hello, Van Lyden? What is the capital of Australia?
VAN LYDEN [OC]: We are not cleared for re-entry.
DOCTOR: How many beans make five?
VAN LYDEN [OC]: Hello, Space control. This is Recovery 7. Will you clear us for re-entry?
DOCTOR: Van Lyden!
VAN LYDEN [OC]: We are not cleared for re-entry.
DOCTOR: Right, cut it open!

Episode Three

[Space Control hangar]

(The capsule's door is cut away and Cornish looks inside.)
CORNISH: It's empty!
DOCTOR: What? Let me see.
CORNISH: But we were talking to Van Lyden.
DOCTOR: Liz, try them again.
LIZ: Hello, recovery 7. Do you read me?
VAN LYDEN [OC]: Hello, Space Control. This is Recovery 7. Will you clear us for re-entry?
(The Doctor points at a tape machine whirring away.)
DOCTOR: Well, well, well. A tape recording.
CORNISH: Triggered off by our speech.
BRIGADIER: Then where are the astronauts?
DOCTOR: Well, someone wanted us to believe they were still inside there. That tape recorder's not a standard part of their equipment, is it?
CORNISH: No, of course not.
DOCTOR: Then somebody put it there, didn't they?
LIZ: Why?
CORNISH: To delay us opening the capsule.
LIZ: Why should they want to do that?
DOCTOR: Well, to gain time. Now, suppose the astronauts were still in there when it landed, and later they were removed.
BRIGADIER: No, that's impossible. This capsule's been guarded all the time, and you two were here.
CORNISH: Except when your men turned us out for that security check.
BRIGADIER: What?
LIZ: They sent us back to the control room while they searched the area.
DOCTOR: I take it you didn't order this.
BRIGADIER: No, I didn't.
DOCTOR: Well, there you are then. A bogus patrol turns up, clears the area, and removes the astronauts at their leisure.
CORNISH: Who would want to kidnap three astronauts?
DOCTOR: Yes, perhaps the same people who replied to that message.
BRIGADIER: I think I'll have a word with my guard commander.
DOCTOR: Yes, I'll come with you.
LIZ: Doctor!
DOCTOR: Yes? What is it?
LIZ: The Geiger counter, it's on maximum. The interior's radioactive. If anyone was in there, they're as good as dead.

[Heldorf's laboratory]

(Three fully suited and helmeted figures lie in an observation area. Carrington is now in full military uniform.)
HELDORF: (germanic) Two million rads. Scientifically, they should be dead.
CARRINGTON: But they're not.
HELDORF: When we tried to remove their helmets, they resisted violently.
CARRINGTON: I told you not to remove their protective clothing.
HELDORF: General Carrington, these men have received massive doses of radiation. They need total blood transfusions immediately. They need antibiotics, cortisone injections. You don't understand the situation. We must reduce the radiation
CARRINGTON: Just increase it!
HELDORF: Are you mad? That would be murder!
CARRINGTON: The radiation which affects these men is something totally new to us. To survive it, they have become dependent on it.
HELDORF: What you're saying is contrary to everything that's understood about radioactivity.
CARRINGTON: You must feed them radiation, otherwise they will die.
HELDORF: No, no, no. You can't ask me to do that.
CARRINGTON: I am not asking you.

[Quinlan's office]

DOCTOR: I don't think you can sweep all this under the Ministry carpet, Sir James. Someone in authority has done this.
QUINLAN: The astronauts were in your charge, Brigadier.
BRIGADIER: They were taken from the Space Centre by two army officers.
QUINLAN: Obviously impostors.
BRIGADIER: The papers of authorisation were genuine. Their passes were made out in the names of two non-existent officers. They had a platoon and an army vehicle of the latest design. Not the sort of thing you buy from an army surplus store.
QUINLAN: You've been very thorough, Brigadier. It's a pity you've no explanation to offer for these strange occurrences.
DOCTOR: We haven't come here to offer explanations, Sir James, we've come to demand them. From you.
QUINLAN: All right.
DOCTOR: You mean you're going to tell us the truth?
QUINLAN: No.
DOCTOR: Oh.
QUINLAN: But I'm going to introduce you to the man who can. Will you come in please?
(Carrington enters.)
QUINLAN: General Carrington, head of the newly formed Space Security department.
LIZ: Space Security? Weren't you an astronaut on Mars Probe 6?
CARRINGTON: Yes, I was. Please sit down, Brigadier. I realise I owe you all an apology. I can only ask you to believe that everything I have done has been for the good of us all.
DOCTOR: Does that include sending coded messages to Mars Probe 7? And kidnapping three astronauts?
LIZ: And Doctor Bruno Taltalian holding a gun on us in the computer room?
CARRINGTON: Taltalian was under strict orders to make sure you didn't have access to the computer. You see, every astronaut is issued with an emergency code only to be used in the ultimate emergency. The code you've been trying to crack. The message we received from Mars Probe 7 told us that the deep space capsule had passed through a hitherto unsuspected high density radiation belt on its way back to Earth orbit.
LIZ: Why didn't you inform Space Control at once?
CARRINGTON: Security.
BRIGADIER: Then why wasn't I informed, sir?
CARRINGTON: UNIT is an international organisation and the government wanted to keep this in its own hands.
DOCTOR: Yes, but why all this extraordinary behaviour? Well, surely radiation is a normal hazard of space travel?
CARRINGTON: We believe this radiation to be a different kind. We believe it to be self-sustaining and highly contagious, and that it could spread like a plague, contaminating the entire planet.
QUINLAN: We don't want the public to become panic-stricken.
DOCTOR: Well, it seems to have been a question of the right hand fighting the left, doesn't it, Brigadier?
CARRINGTON: Good! Well, I hope this explanation has eased your minds, gentlemen.
DOCTOR: Well, it hasn't eased mine.
CARRINGTON: I'm sorry?
DOCTOR: I should like to take a look at these mysteriously irradiated astronauts for myself, if I may.
CARRINGTON: There's no need for that. They're in expert hands.
DOCTOR: Nevertheless, I would still like to see them.
QUINLAN: Well, I don't see it can do any harm.
CARRINGTON: Oh, very well then, I'll take you there now. But I can assure you they're perfectly safe.

[Heldorf's laboratory]

(Heldorf and his assistant are being held at gunpoint. The astronauts are released from the isolation room.)
HELDORF: Who are you people?
REEGAN: I've told you before to be quiet.
HELDORF: Where are you going? Where are you taking them?
REEGAN: Shut up!
HELDORF: But if you take them out of here, they will die. You must stop!
REEGAN: I'll take them out to the others. You two go back by the direct route when you've finished here.
(Heldorf tries to leave and is punched in the stomach. He tries again and is shot. The assistant picks up a chair and also gets shot.)

[Outside Heldorf's laboratory]

(The astronauts get into the back of a truck.)
REEGAN: You two ride with them. They won't hurt you. You've got guns, haven't you?
(The two killers get in the back and Reegan drives the Heyhoe laundry truck away. Shortly afterwards, the Doctor drives up with Carrington, Liz and the Brigadier. Carrington opens the shed doors.)

[Heldorf's laboratory]

BRIGADIER: Do you know where the phone is, sir?
CARRINGTON: Oh, yes. It's over there.
BRIGADIER: Hello, UNIT control? This is the Brigadier. 
DOCTOR: Perfectly safe, were they?
BRIGADIER: (in background) This is a yellow alert.
CARRINGTON: I don't understand it. Who would have done this?
BRIGADIER: I want a full emergency team.
LIZ: Doctor, look at this.
BRIGADIER: Map reference C341.
LIZ: These seem to be the radiation records of the missing astronauts. Over two million rads. They couldn't possibly have survived that amount.
(The laundry van drives into a gravel workings and parks up. Wearing a radiation suit, Reegan pulls the bodies of his henchmen from the back and puts them on the side of a gravel heap with papers and their weapons. Then he scrambles up the heap and forces gravel down to cover them. Reegan drives the van off and parks up on a country road. There he changes the number plates at the touch of a button, and the signage on the van becomes Silcock Bakeries at the same time. Back at the lab, a soldier walks through with a Geiger counter.)
DOCTOR: Liz, what were those exact radiation figures again?
LIZ: Two million, one oh two, four six two.
DOCTOR: Thank you.
CARRINGTON: Are you getting anywhere?
DOCTOR: Possibly.
CARRINGTON: Do you realise the importance of this
DOCTOR: I realise the importance very well, General Carrington. That is why I must be allowed to continue my work undisturbed.
CARRINGTON: I'm so sorry.
LIZ: These are the complete readings.
DOCTOR: Oh, thanks. You know, it's the most extraordinary thing. Those astronauts were emitting radiation like walking reactors.
LIZ: But radiation destroys human tissue.
DOCTOR: Yes. I know.
(The Brigadier enters.)
BRIGADIER: The radioactive trace goes to just outside the building, sir. Then it vanishes.
CARRINGTON: Obviously they were taken away in a vehicle.
BRIGADIER: Why should anyone kidnap them?
CARRINGTON: Contagious radiation could be a terrible weapon in the hands of a foreign power.
BRIGADIER: Who else knew of the location of this laboratory, sir?
CARRINGTON: Only my immediate staff.
BRIGADIER: And Sir James Quinlan, and his immediate staff. Well Doctor, any luck?
DOCTOR: Well, I can tell you where your three astronauts are.
CARRINGTON: Well?
DOCTOR: They're still in orbit.
CARRINGTON: But they came down in the capsule. They were here. I saw them.
DOCTOR: No, you saw three spacesuits. I don't know what came down in Recovery 7, but it certainly wasn't human.

[Underground laboratory]

(The astronauts are back in an isolation chamber.)
LENNOX: They must be dying.
REEGAN: I don't think so.
LENNOX: Well, I can't deal with them here. They should be the intensive care unit in a hospital.
REEGAN: You've got your instructions, Lennox.
LENNOX: Doctor Lennox, if you don't mind.
REEGAN: I thought they took that away from you. (into phone) Hello? This is Reegan. Everything went fine. Lennox is looking after them. No, no trouble at all. I just dropped those two off on the way. Right.

[Space Control hangar]

CORNISH: And you really think that they're still in orbit in the Mars Probe?
DOCTOR: I do.
CORNISH: Their life support systems will be running down. We've got to send up another recovery capsule.
DOCTOR: I should do that as quickly as possible, if I were you.
CORNISH: I'll get onto Quinlan.
DOCTOR: Must you?
CORNISH: I'll need his authority. Get me Sir James Quinlan. Top priority.

[Quinlan's office]

QUINLAN: Yes? Yes. But we don't really know if the astronauts are up there.

[Space Control hangar]

CORNISH: Well, if there's any possibility they're alive up there, we've got to go and get them.

[Quinlan's office]

QUINLAN: Yes, of course, but the government simply will not authorise the expenditure on so little evidence.

[Space Control hangar]

CORNISH: We're not talking about money. We're talking about human life.

[Quinlan's office]

QUINLAN: Well, yes, indeed, I

[Space Control hangar]

CORNISH: Sir James, I'm going to start preparations now. Unless I get your full backing, I'll call a press conference and tell them the entire story.

[Quinlan's office]

QUINLAN: I would advise you not to do that.

[Space Control hangar]

CORNISH: Then you'll have to make sure that I don't have to.

[Quinlan's office]

QUINLAN: What are we going to do?
CARRINGTON: They mustn't send up a second recovery capsule.
QUINLAN: I know that, but how are we going to stop them?

[Underground laboratory]

(One of the astronauts goes to the observation room window then slides to the floor. Reegan enters as Lennox goes to the door.)
REEGAN: And just what do you think you're doing?
LENNOX: You've got to let me examine those men.
REEGAN: It's against orders.
LENNOX: The radiation count has dropped drastically. They should be recovering.
REEGAN: That's good, then.
LENNOX: But one of them's collapsed!
REEGAN: Well, I was hired to get them here, that's all.
LENNOX: You weren't hired to let them die.
REEGAN: We don't know they're dying.
LENNOX: Reegan, do you think you'll get your money if they're dead?
(Reegan unlocks the isolation room door.)
LENNOX: Well, what about protective clothes?
REEGAN: You said the radiation had dropped. Right, I won't hang about in there.
(Reegan puts on a pair of protective gloves and goes through the little airlock into the isolation chamber. He helps the collapsed astronaut back onto the slab with the other two but it suddenly pushes him aside and knocks him down. The astronaut enters the lab.)
LENNOX: It's all right. I want to help you. Can't you understand? I want to help you.
(Lennox runs up the stairs and it follows him. The outside door is locked.)
LENNOX: No! No!
(The astronaut stretches its hand towards Lennox's face, then slowly crumples to the floor. Reegan runs up.)
LENNOX: You shouldn't have locked this door. I might have been killed.
REEGAN: Shut up. Help me get him back in there.
(The phone rings.)
REEGAN: Hello. All right, I'll take care of them. Listen, about those astronauts. Isotopes? Well, you'd better get them over here. I found out what's wrong with these fellows. They don't need less radiation, they need more!
(The bodies are discovered at the gravel workings. In the lab, isotopes have been delivered and are being placed in the isolation room.)

[Space Control hangar]

CORNISH: (into phone.) I must have all stages in go condition as soon as possible, so get on with it!
BRIGADIER: Any trouble?
CORNISH: Everything's taking just that little bit longer than it should.
DOCTOR: And why do you think that is?
CORNISH: I think it's got something to do with Sir James Quinlan.
BRIGADIER: Could you prove it?
CORNISH: No.

[Underground laboratory]

LENNOX: I feel as if I've just murdered them.
REEGAN: You just keep doing what you're told. They'll be all right.
(A phone rings.)
REEGAN: Who is it? All right. I'll open the front door.
LENNOX: Look!
REEGAN: What is it?
LENNOX: It's working.
(The astronauts are moving.)
REEGAN: I told you they'd be all right. They thrive on the stuff.

[Space Control hangar]

BRIGADIER: (into phone.) What? Yes, I see. Right, I'll get right down there. Two bodies have been found in a gravel pit in Hertfordshire. They died from radiation.

[Underground laboratory]

REEGAN: Hey, Lennox, you're a kind of a scientist. Do you know these two?
(Reegan hands Lennox photographs of Liz and the Doctor in the computer room.)
LENNOX: Yes, I think I met the girl once. She was doing research at Cambridge. Why?
REEGAN: Seems like they're getting in the way. I'll need to deal with them.

[Space Control hangar]

(The Doctor has swept the capsule for radiation.)
DOCTOR: It's the most extraordinary thing. The radioactive contamination has almost vanished. If you can't get Recovery 8 ready in time, you can use this capsule.
CORNISH: Provided we can get the three thousand tons of rockets to go underneath it.
(A soldier hands a message to Liz.)
DOCTOR: Who's it from?
LIZ: The Brigadier. He wants us to go down to Hertfordshire to look at those bodies.
DOCTOR: How very morbid.
LIZ: Are you coming?
DOCTOR: No, I'm going to stay and get this capsule fully operational.
(So Liz gets to drive Bessie. Going through a village, another car follows her.) 
BRIGADIER: Doctor?
DOCTOR: You're back soon.
BRIGADIER: Well, I started back an hour ago.
DOCTOR: But Liz has just gone to meet you. We received a message asking us to join you. You didn't send it?
BRIGADIER: I'll get after her.
(Liz has realised she is being followed, and is trying to lose them. The two men force her to stop in a village but she runs across a playing field and across a weir - Marlow weir if you're interested. The men catch her half way across. She pushes one away and he slips, just clinging on above the water. Then Liz goes over the railing towards the rushing water.)

Episode Four

[Weir]

(The first man scrambles up and helps the second to pull Liz back up onto the weir.)

[Underground laboratory]

LIZ: Will you let go of my arm, you're hurting me. Ow!
(Liz is forced down the stairs.)
REEGAN: I've brought you some company.
LENNOX: I thought they told you to get both of them.
REEGAN: Oh, he wouldn't keep the appointment. She's a scientist. She can give you a hand.
LIZ: Doctor Lennox!
REEGAN: Somebody remembers you. How are our zombie friends?
LENNOX: Surviving, but only just.
REEGAN: I didn't expect them to be dancing a jig. Start making yourself useful.
LIZ: What if I don't?
REEGAN: I might just lock you in there with them.

[Brigadier's office]

BRIGADIER: I've issued Miss Shaw's description to every police force in the country.
CARRINGTON: Why? Do you expect her to be wandering the streets?
BRIGADIER: No, sir, just a formality.
CARRINGTON: I took the liberty of examining the things found on the bodies of those two men.
BRIGADIER: They should have gone to Forensics, sir, untouched.
CARRINGTON: No need for that. Forensics can't tell us anything we can't see for ourselves. Look. Newspaper cutting in a foreign language.
DOCTOR: Anyone can buy a foreign newspaper, General.
CARRINGTON: What about this comb then, with the makers imprint on it in the same language?
DOCTOR: Let me look.
(The Doctor uses a jeweler's eyeglass to read the tiny marks.)
DOCTOR: Very remiss of them, keeping this.
BRIGADIER: They could have been planted, sir.
CARRINGTON: No. The only people who could set up an organisation of this size would be foreign agents with enormous resources behind them.
DOCTOR: And hair combs.
CARRINGTON: They want to use the radiated astronauts as a weapon.
DOCTOR: I've told you where your astronauts are, General. They're still in orbit.
CARRINGTON: That's ridiculous.
DOCTOR: Is it? When your Professor Heldorf had the aliens in his care, he started to record some sort of radio communication impulses.
CARRINGTON: Astronauts do have walkie-talkies in their helmets, you know.
DOCTOR: Then why didn't Heldorf talk to them?
CARRINGTON: Yes, well, perhaps he was recording the level of radioactivity in their bodies.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, I don't think so. Well, I'm going down to the Space Centre, use the computer. I trust your man Taltalian won't hold a gun on me this time?
CARRINGTON: Doctor, nothing is to be gained by deciphering these impulses. Our objective should be to find the missing astronauts.
DOCTOR: General, how many times must I tell you, your astronauts are still in orbit. My objective is to find out what these aliens are trying to say to us.

[Space Control computer room]

CORNISH: What's the K factor?
TALTALIAN: Fuel one thousand two hundred ninety seven tons.
CORNISH: No other available source?
TALTALIAN: Liquid fuel in production, two thousand tons.
CORNISH: Well, that can be speeded up.
TALTALIAN: The new M3 variant's highly volatile. It was not intended for manned spaceflight.
CORNISH: We'll have to use it.
TALTALIAN: The lift-off rate would crush the astronaut.
CORNISH: What about reducing the Gs by mixing K and M3?
TALTALIAN: I will compute that. But you will still have to get your rocket built.
CORNISH: The minister is putting up every possible objection.
TALTALIAN: What do you expect? This Doctor's theory is ridiculous.
CORNISH: I thought you were supposed to be helping me, or do you intend to commit more sabotage?
TALTALIAN: I was ordered to do that by General Carrington. I have computed the assembly of the rescue rocket as you asked me.
(The Doctor quietly enters and sticks a pen into Taltalian's back.)
DOCTOR: You're not armed, I hope?
TALTALIAN: I would not have used that gun, not on a fellow scientist.
DOCTOR: Thank you. I'm much relieved.
(Taltalian sees the Doctor is only holding a pen.)
CORNISH: Have they found your assistant?
DOCTOR: No, not yet. May I have the use of your computer?
CORNISH: Yes, certainly, and I'm sure Doctor Taltalian will be only too pleased to help you. When you have a moment, I'd like to see you in the control room about the Recovery Capsule.
(Cornish leaves.)
DOCTOR: I'd like to programme these impulse records, if I may.
TALTALIAN: What do you hope to learn from them?
DOCTOR: Well if I knew, I wouldn't need a computer, would I?
TALTALIAN: To make a start, we must have some idea.
DOCTOR: Well, I suspect some sort of pattern.
TALTALIAN: This could take a long time.
DOCTOR: Well, it mustn't, Taltalian, it mustn't.
TALTALIAN: Doctor, I am not trying to obstruct you.
(The phone rings.)
TALTALIAN: Excuse me. Hello, Taltalian here. Yes? Who is that? A moment, please. It is for you.
DOCTOR: Thank you. Hello? Yes? Yes, it is. Who is this?
(The other party rings off.)
DOCTOR: My assistant, Liz Shaw.
TALTALIAN: They have found her?
DOCTOR: No. Someone threatening to kill her if I don't stop interfering. Well, let's get back to work, shall we?

[Underground laboratory]

(Liz is working at a computer console.)
LIZ: Two million rads, dropping to two million minus fifty thousand.
LENNOX: Minus five oh thousand. You'd better tell Reegan we've only got one more canister left. Well? Do you want them to die?
MASTERS: You'd better be right.
(The thug leaves. Liz puts on her coat and dashes up the stairs.)
LENNOX: It's no use. They lock it.
LIZ: Are you a prisoner?
LENNOX: That's a matter of opinion.
LIZ: Are you or aren't you?
LENNOX: I can come and go as I please. But I haven't got anywhere to go.
LIZ: You were a respected scientist once.
LENNOX: Grossly underpaid. Can you help me?
(Lennox hands Liz the radiation suit gloves and helmet, then puts a door key on the table.)
LENNOX: I, I lost my key somewhere, for that door up there. They'll find me in the cubicle, locked and bolted from the outside. Do you understand?
LIZ: Yes, of course. Why don't you come with me?
LENNOX: Where would I go?
(Liz puts the radiation helmet on Lennox and takes the key. She opens the isolation chamber door and Lennox enters with an isotope canister. She locks and bolts it behind him and runs up the stairs again.)

[Space Control computer room]

DOCTOR: These impulses are mathematical formulae for building an electronic device.
TALTALIAN: What sort of a electronic device?
DOCTOR: I'll have to build it to find out, won't I?
TALTALIAN: In defiance of the message threatening Miss Shaw's life?
DOCTOR: Well, how are these people going to know what I'm doing unless somebody tells them?
TALTALIAN: Who would do that?
DOCTOR: You, for instance?
(Liz comes out of a small blockhouse and runs through the woods.)
TALTALIAN: You are being most insulting!
DOCTOR: And you are being continually obstructive.
TALTALIAN: I acted under the orders of General Carrington.
DOCTOR: Did you? Or are you involved with the people who are really behind this?
TALTALIAN: What people are you talking about?
DOCTOR: The people who kidnapped Miss Shaw, who kidnapped the three astronauts.
TALTALIAN: Have you told the Brigadier about your suspicions?
DOCTOR: No, not yet.
TALTALIAN: Why not, if you are so sure of your facts?
DOCTOR: Well, I thought I'd offer you some sort of alternative. A ruthless investigation by the Brigadier, or a few quiet words with me and your name kept out of things.
TALTALIAN: I don't know what you are talking about.
DOCTOR: I think you do, Taltalian, and I'm going to give you a little time to think it over. Right, well, if you'll excuse me, I must see what can be done about building this machine. Think over what I've said. I shall expect to hear from you very soon. (The Doctor leaves. Taltalian goes to a cupboard and takes out a palm-sized device.)

[Road]

(Liz has reached a road, but the first car past does not stop for her. The second one does.)
LIZ: Doctor Talt
(He points a gun at her.)
LIZ: Talian.
TALTALIAN: Get in, Miss Shaw.

[Underground laboratory]

LIZ: I tell you nobody helped me. That door was left open.
REEGAN: You might have killed poor Lennox, locking him in with those things.
LIZ: He should have thought of that before he joined you.
REEGAN: Get over there and help him.
MASTERS: Come on.
LIZ: Don't touch me, you.
REEGAN: And Will? Make sure that door is kept locked. Did you bring it?
(Taltalian hands over the device and some papers.)
TALTALIAN: These are the operating instructions. This is the communication code. It's quite simple.
REEGAN: A little too simple.
TALTALIAN: What does that mean?
REEGAN: I need to talk to those things.
TALTALIAN: You have a list of simple signals and commands. Transmit and they will obey.
REEGAN: And if they don't?
TALTALIAN: You threaten to cut off their supply of radiation. There is a signal for that, too.
REEGAN: And translating their replies? There's a machine for that?
TALTALIAN: Yes, in my computer room. You don't need it.
REEGAN: I'm the one dealing with these creatures.
TALTALIAN: You will use these creatures to carry out a series of raids on carefully chosen targets. You know enough to do your job, but I have further instructions for you.
REEGAN: Have you now?
TALTALIAN: Your call to the Doctor threatening the girl's life was stupid.
REEGAN: It might have slowed him down a little.
TALTALIAN: On the contrary, it merely made him more determined and suspicious. Suspicious of me.
REEGAN: Too bad.
TALTALIAN: He has got to be put out of the way permanently.
REEGAN: To save your neck?
TALTALIAN: He is about to discover how to construct one of those machines.
REEGAN: Clever.
TALTALIAN: And he has got to be stopped.
REEGAN: All right, I'll deal with him. And since your own skin's in danger, you can help me.

[Brigadier's office]

BRIGADIER: Taltalian? Do you have you any proof?
DOCTOR: No, not a scrap.
BRIGADIER: Then why accuse him?
DOCTOR: Something even his computers don't have. Intuition. I think I rattled him.
BRIGADIER: Taltalian was acting under Carrington's orders. Quinlan explained that.
DOCTOR: Yes, I know, I heard him. And I didn't believe a word of it.
BRIGADIER: Why not?
DOCTOR: Well, first they try keeping us in the dark altogether and when that didn't work, they fall back on some prepared cover story. Contagious radiation, indeed.
BRIGADIER: Then what is happening, Doctor?
DOCTOR: I don't know. Perhaps I'll know better when I've built this device.
BRIGADIER: What's this?
DOCTOR: Advanced electronic equipment. I need it at once.
BRIGADIER: Right, I'll see to it.
DOCTOR: Good. I'll be in my laboratory. I suppose there's no news?
BRIGADIER: Miss Shaw?
DOCTOR: Mmm.
BRIGADIER: No, nothing. We're doing all we can.
DOCTOR: Yes, of course.

[Underground laboratory]

LENNOX: (sotto) Thanks for keeping quiet.
LIZ: (sotto) Do you think he suspects you helped me?
LENNOX: (sotto) He suspects everyone.
LIZ: (sotto) If at first you don't succeed.
LENNOX: (sotto) You won't get another chance.
LIZ: (sotto) We'll see.
LENNOX: (sotto) How did they get you back?
LIZ: (sotto) I ran into an old friend.

[Underground room]

TALTALIAN: I have got to get back.
REEGAN: It's a delicate operation. It's quite simple.
(Reegan opens a briefcase. It contains dynamite and a timing device.)
REEGAN: All you have to do is set the dial to the time you require. How long do you need to get clear of the building?
TALTALIAN: Ten minutes, maybe more.
REEGAN: Let's say quarter of an hour. We can't have you taking risks. Now, you leave the case as near to the Doctor as you possibly can. You slide these catches together and that starts the mechanism. Fifteen minutes later, no more Doctor.
TALTALIAN: But what if he should try to open the case while I am still away?
REEGAN: The same result, a little earlier.
TALTALIAN: It's too risky.
REEGAN: It's you he's after.
TALTALIAN: Very well.
(Masters helps Taltalian on with his coat. While his back is turned, Reegan alters the timer on the bomb.)
REEGAN: Doctor Taltalian? Do as you're told and your troubles will be over.

[Space Control computer room]

CORNISH: Every available astronaut is suddenly not available, not fit, transferred to other duties, waiting for security clearance.
DOCTOR: Is that all?
CORNISH: All? What good's a rocket without a pilot?
DOCTOR: I'll take the rocket up for you myself.
CORNISH: Thank you, Doctor, but I don't think you realise just what's necessary.
DOCTOR: My dear man, I've spent more time in space than any astronaut on your staff. Not, I'll admit, in the rather primitive contraptions that you use, but I'll manage.
CORNISH: Doctor, I don't think you realise what's
DOCTOR: I can also withstand considerably more G-force than most people, even though I do say so myself.
CORNISH: Well if you insist. You can take the tests.
DOCTOR: Tests, simulations, anything you like. When that recovery capsule is ready, I'll take it up.
(Taltalian enters, carrying the briefcase.)
TALTALIAN: Hello, Doctor, I was just coming over to see you.
DOCTOR: I've saved you a journey, haven't I.
CORNISH: Do you have the computations for lift-off?
TALTALIAN: All but the final phase.
CORNISH: Well, let me have them as soon as possible, will you? I'll see about those tests, Doctor.
(Cornish leaves. Taltalian is clearly nervous.)
DOCTOR: Have you thought over what I spoke to you about?
TALTALIAN: Yes.
DOCTOR: And?
TALTALIAN: I will tell you everything, if you will give me a chance to get away.
DOCTOR: Very well.
TALTALIAN: The information I need is in my car. I will go and fetch it. You will wait for me here?
DOCTOR: Yes, all right.
(Taltalian slides the catches together. Bang! Scream!)

[Underground laboratory]

LIZ: I think I've got it now.
REEGAN: Send stand up.
(Beep, beep, and the astronauts stand.)
REEGAN: Forward.
(Beep, beep, beep.)
REEGAN: Send stop.
(Beep, beep, beep.)
REEGAN: There can be no problems with that thing.
LIZ: It's simple enough. Even you might be able to manage it.
REEGAN: We can do without the back-chat. Let me have it.
LIZ: Taltalian gave you this thing, didn't he?
REEGAN: Never you mind.
LIZ: That case you gave him. What was it?
REEGAN: Well, you could say it was a way of killing two birds with one stone.

[Space Control computer room]

(The table the briefcase had been on is a wreck, but that's all.)
BRIGADIER: You seem to have been right about Taltalian.
DOCTOR: A lot of good it did me, and him.
BRIGADIER: He was obviously trying to plant a time bomb on you. Lucky for you the mechanism was faulty.
DOCTOR: I'm not sure that it was. Look at this. See this is set to zero. Taltalian must have thought that he had plenty of time to get away, when in fact this bomb was set to go off instantaneously.
BRIGADIER: So whoever gave it to him wanted to get rid of both of you?
DOCTOR: Yes. Taltalian was a weak link, you know. I think his employers wanted him out of the way.
BRIGADIER: Another dead end then?
DOCTOR: Yeah, I'm afraid so.
(The Doctor takes a second device out of the cupboard.)
DOCTOR: Brigadier, look at this.
BRIGADIER: What's that?
DOCTOR: Well, it's something very similar to the machine I'm trying to build. And Taltalian had one all the time.

[Quinlan's office]

QUINLAN: Well, time's running out. Cornish is almost ready to put up that recovery rocket.
CARRINGTON: You were supposed to stop him, sir.
QUINLAN: Don't you think I've tried? I've tried every possible delay.
CARRINGTON: You must keep on trying, Sir James.
QUINLAN: That Doctor's even volunteered to pilot the recovery rocket.
CARRINGTON: He must be stopped.
QUINLAN: We could tell him the truth.
CARRINGTON: No. We know too little about him.
QUINLAN: There may be not alternative.
CARRINGTON: There's got to be. If that rocket goes up, it means disaster for the entire world.

[Underground laboratory]

REEGAN: (into phone) Now don't you worry, sir. Everything's going fine. Yes, it's a pity about that. This Doctor fellow must have nine lives. Tonight? Well it's a bit soon. All right, if I must I must. I'll see to it. Right. Will, go and get the van. there's a good fellow.
MASTERS: Okay, Mister Reegan.
LENNOX: You're taking them away?
REEGAN: No, just a little excursion. Open the door.
(Lennox unlocks the isolation chamber.)
REEGAN: This thing, can it work the other way round, so they can talk to us?
LIZ: No. It just sends impulses they seem to understand.
REEGAN: But there could be a machine?
LIZ: I imagine so.
REEGAN: I think I'll be paying two visits tonight.
(He summons the Van Lyden spacesuit.)

[Space Centre guard post]

(A figure walks towards the post with the light behind him.)
SOLDIER: Halt! Halt or I'll fire!
(He pumps six shots into the figure, which walks up to the barrier and puts a hand on it. Energy travels along it to the soldier who is thrown back, unconscious. The astronaut pushes up the barrier and walks into the Space Centre. Two technicians are finishing cleaning up the computer room when it enters. One is thrown off just by a touch. The older man swings a piece of metal at it which flashes and he collapses too. The astronaut goes to the cupboard and searches it. A soldier enters and fires his rifle. He gets thrown back into the corridor.)

[Brigadier's office]

DOCTOR: I tell you, it converts radio impulses into human speech. The aliens in Heldorf's Laboratory were trying to communicate with him.
BRIGADIER: So you were right, they aren't human.
DOCTOR: I never believed they were. Now, if I can only build the other half of this thing.
BRIGADIER: We could contact the astronauts or whatever they are.
DOCTOR: Yes, probably, if you were to hurry up with those parts that I've ordered.
BRIGADIER: Most of them are coming from Japan, Doctor.
(The phone rings.)
BRIGADIER: Yes? Yes, he's here. Sir James Quinlan.
DOCTOR: Thank you. Hello. Yes, Sir James?

[Quinlan's office]

QUINLAN: Doctor, I'd like to know if it's still your intention to pilot the recovery rocket.

[Brigadier's office]

DOCTOR: Most certainly!

[Quinlan's office]

QUINLAN: I can't persuade you that your action will be disastrous?

[Brigadier's office]

DOCTOR: You might. If you were to tell me the truth, Sir James. The whole truth.

[Quinlan's office]

QUINLAN: Then you leave me no choice. Will you come and see me please me, at once?

[Brigadier's office]

DOCTOR: Very well, Sir James. Thank you. He wants me to come and see him. He says he's going to tell me the whole truth.
BRIGADIER: I'm coming with you.

[Quinlan's office]

(The astronaut enters through the rear door. Quinlan tries to back away but it finally touches him and he falls backwards onto his desk. Then it blows open the safe behind the main door with a single touch and searches it. The Doctor enters.)
DOCTOR: Sir James!
(The Doctor checks Quinlan for signs of life as the astronaut approaches him from behind.)

Episode Five

[Quinlan's office]

(The Doctor sees the astronaut and stays very still. The Brigadier enters and shoots.)
DOCTOR: No, don't!
(The astronaut walks past the Brigadier to the door.)
DOCTOR: Brigadier, don't try and stop him.
(An soldier runs in.)
DOCTOR: Keep back, man, keep back!
(The astronaut touches the soldier, who is thrown against the wall, then leaves closing the door behind him and sealing it with a touch.)
DOCTOR: There's no point in trying to follow him. There's nothing we can do.

[Underground laboratory]

LENNOX: Do you really think they're not human?
LIZ: That's what I intend to find out. Do you know where Reegan's taken the third one?
LENNOX: No. Don't ask so many questions.
LIZ: Is Reegan in charge?
LENNOX: No, he works for someone. Someone high up.
LIZ: He's got to be stopped.
LENNOX: You won't get away again.
LIZ: But you might.

[Quinlan's office]

(UNIT has broken in. The Doctor is examining the blasted safe.)
BRIGADIER: Doctor?
DOCTOR: Mmm?
BRIGADIER: Look at these bullets. Flattened.
DOCTOR: Deflected by some sort of force field, I should think.
BRIGADIER: So there's no way of stopping them?
DOCTOR: Not with bullets.
(Benton enters.)
BENTON: Strong radioactive trace as far as the road outside, sir, and then nothing.
BRIGADIER: Thank you, Benton.
(Benton leaves.)
BRIGADIER: So, they were taken away in a vehicle.
DOCTOR: Somebody's using these creatures, Brigadier. They're not free agents. They were brought to Earth for some purpose.
BRIGADIER: Conquest?
DOCTOR: Possibly. Or is that we are supposed to think?
(The astronaut returns to the underground laboratory under Reegan's control.)

[Space Control]

DOCTOR: What's the rate of fuel consumption?
CORNISH: For the first two and a half minutes, fifteen tons per second. We have to use a mixture of standard fuel and the new M3 variant.
DOCTOR: Has that ever been done before?
CORNISH: No. We can't get enough of the standard fuel in time.
DOCTOR: Hasn't the death of Sir James Quinlan made things any easier for you?
CORNISH: Harder. Thank you. Everything's wrapped up in red tape until they appoint a successor. Oh, this is your medical report, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, don't let's bother about that for the time being.
CORNISH: Oh, this is incredible. According to this, you
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, I know. I told you everything would be all right.

[Underground laboratory]

(In the isolation booth, the Van Lyden suit astronaut collapses. Lennox brings another isotope then goes out into the main lab.)
LIZ: What have you done to it?
REEGAN: It's had a busy time.
LENNOX: Busy? Doing what?
REEGAN: Killing.
LIZ: Who's been killed?
REEGAN: Some of your friends from UNIT.
LIZ: The Brigadier?
REEGAN: No, I'm afraid not. Just some of the other ranks.
LENNOX: What happened?
REEGAN: One touch from him and down they go.
LIZ: No one resisted?
REEGAN: They tried. Bullets just bounce off them. With these three you can do anything. Walk into Fort Knox and help yourself.
LIZ: Oh, that's what you're going to do with them, is it?
REEGAN: I might. Keep feeding them radiation. I've got a lot more work for him to do. Tony. Lock that main door then come through and see me.
(Reegan goes into the other room. Tony Flynn goes up the stairs.)
LIZ: Well, you're working for a murderer.
LENNOX: Oh, Reegan was just boasting.
LIZ: You don't believe that.
LENNOX: Look, it's got nothing to do with me, Miss Shaw. I'm paid to look after them.
LIZ: You are just as guilty as if you'd killed those people yourself. Well? What are you going to do about it?
LENNOX: What can I do? I'm too much involved.
LIZ: You could go to UNIT and tell them where we are.
LENNOX: Reegan would kill me.
LIZ: Go to Brigadier Lethbridge Stewart. He'll give you protective custody. You'll be safe.
LENNOX: Anyway, I can't leave here now. Reegan's taken away my key to that door.
LIZ: Then you'll just have to talk your way out.

[Space Control]

CARRINGTON: I understand you're going ahead with launching this rocket.
CORNISH: Yes.
CARRINGTON: I absolutely forbid it.
CORNISH: You haven't the authority to forbid it, General.
DOCTOR: What have you got against it?
CARRINGTON: Sir James Quinlan murdered, alien creatures attacking the Space Centre, the sudden death of Doctor Taltalian. This is obviously just the beginning.
CORNISH: The beginning of what?
CARRINGTON: An alien invasion with the collaboration of a foreign power.
DOCTOR: All the more reason for me to go up in that rocket and find out what's happened up there.
CARRINGTON: Are you a trained astronaut, sir?
CORNISH: He's perfectly capable of making the trip. I have his medical report here.
CARRINGTON: You haven't answered my question, Doctor.
DOCTOR: You haven't answered mine. Why are you opposed to this launch?
CARRINGTON: Could this rocket carry a nuclear warhead?
CORNISH: Yes.
CARRINGTON: Then that's what it should be used for.
DOCTOR: Since we don't know what's up there, wouldn't it be more intelligent to carry a man rather than a bomb?
CARRINGTON: I might remind you, gentlemen, that I am responsible for Space Security.
CORNISH: And I am responsible for this Space Centre.
CARRINGTON: This launch was against the expressed wishes of Sir James Quinlan.
DOCTOR: Then I suggest you take the matter up with his successor, when he's been appointed.
CARRINGTON: I shall go to the highest authority to have you stopped.
CORNISH: Then you'd better get on with it, General. We blast off in two hours time.

[Underground laboratory]

(The Van Lyden suit gets up.)
LENNOX: It's recovering.
LIZ: So Reegan can commit more murders. You're the only one who can stop it. You'll have to get a message out.
LENNOX: You know that's impossible.
LIZ: There's the telephone. You're allowed to use it.
LENNOX: All the calls are monitored.
LIZ: Then you'll have to go yourself.
(Flynn enters from outside.)
LIZ: (sotto) You want to see Reegan. Tell him the isotopes are running out and you've got to go and get some more.
LENNOX: (sotto) He won't believe me.
LIZ: (sotto) Try.
LENNOX: I want to see Mister Reegan. It's urgent.
FLYNN: It'll have to wait.
REEGAN: I said it's urgent!
FLYNN: He's in London. A meeting with the boss.
LIZ: These creatures are dying.
FLYNN: How can you tell?
LIZ: Look at the readings. You can see for yourself.
LENNOX: This dial here. It should be at maximum.
FLYNN: Why didn't you tell Reegan this before?
LIZ: It's only just happened. We don't understand it.
LENNOX: We're running out of isotopes. I've got to go and get more.
FLYNN: No one is to leave here.
LIZ: Then you'll be responsible if they die.
FLYNN: I'll call Reegan on the phone.
LIZ: There isn't time for that.
LENNOX: I've got to go now or it'll be too late. Look here, I'm not a prisoner here.
FLYNN: Reegan took your key away.
LENNOX: Yes, but that was because the girl tried to escape. You're supposed to be guarding her, not me. Now, open that door!
(Flynn leads Lennox up the stairs and opens the door.)
LENNOX: I'll be back as soon as I can. Keep an eye on that girl.

[Space Control]

WOMAN: Fuel injection report. Forty percent now loaded. Will switch to M3 variant at sixty five percent.
CORNISH: Fuel injection report acknowledged.
MAN: Communications circuit check now underway. Everything go condition.
CORNISH: Time you were in the preparation room, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Right.
BRIGADIER: Why've you advanced lift-off time?
DOCTOR: Well, there seems to be some sort of official opposition to my going. General Carrington's trying to stop the launch.
BRIGADIER: Is he?
WOMAN: Astronaut now due in preparation chamber.
DOCTOR: Right, I must be off.
MAN: There's a call for you, Brigadier.
BRIGADIER: Oh, thank you. Lethbridge Stewart?

[UNIT HQ]

BENTON: Sergeant Benton here, sir.

[Space Control]

BRIGADIER: Yes, Benton?

[UNIT HQ]

BENTON: A man called Lennox has just turned up out of the blue. Very agitated. Says he knows something about the missing astronauts.

[Space Control]

BRIGADIER: What did he tell you?

[UNIT HQ]

BENTON: Nothing, sir. Said he'll only talk to you in person.

[Space Control]

BRIGADIER: What do you make of him, Benton?

[UNIT HQ]

BENTON: He seems frightened, scared out of his wits. He wants us to put him into protective custody.

[Space Control]

BRIGADIER: Put him into one of the cells.

[UNIT HQ]

BENTON: Shall I tell him you're coming back to see him, sir?

[Space Control]

BRIGADIER: Yes, but I've got to finish my security checks here. I'll be back as soon as possible.

[UNIT HQ cell]

LENNOX: You're putting me in here?
BENTON: Look, sir, you wanted protective custody. You can't be safer than in a cell.
LENNOX: What's out there?
BENTON: It's just a yard, sir. What are you so frightened of?
LENNOX: I can only tell the Brigadier. How long will he be? 
BENTON: He'll be back as soon as he can, sir. I'll get you a cup of tea and something to read.
LENNOX: No. No, thank you. Lock the door, won't you?
BENTON: Yes, sir. I'll lock the door.

[Space Control]

CORNISH: Report on astronaut's readiness, please.
WOMAN: Astronaut ready. Now proceeding through quarantine area to capsule.

[Quarantine area]

DOCTOR: Hello, Brigadier. What are you doing here?
BRIGADIER: I thought I'd see you off. They told me to wait here.
DOCTOR: What is this place?
BRIGADIER: Some sort of waiting room, I imagine, in case there's any hold-up for the astronauts.
DOCTOR: Not very impressive for one's last sight of Earth, is it?
WOMAN [OC]: Astronaut to proceed now to capsule. 
BRIGADIER: Well, goodbye, Doctor. Good luck.
DOCTOR: Goodbye, Brigadier. And thank you.

[Underground laboratory]

REEGAN: I told you no one was to leave here.
FLYNN: But he said they were dying.
REEGAN: How would you know?
FLYNN: Well, she said so, too.
REEGAN: So, you put him up to this. There's nothing wrong with them!
LIZ: We thought they were dying.
REEGAN: The readings haven't changed since I left. Where's he gone?
LIZ: He's gone to get more isotopes.
REEGAN: You're lying.
(Reegan takes out a gun.)
REEGAN: Did you send him to see your friends at UNIT? Is that it? Answer me!
LIZ: All right. He's gone to see Lethbridge Stewart. You're too late.
REEGAN: Don't you believe it. Watch her!
FLYNN: Don't try anything.
LIZ: It's all right. I won't hurt you.
(Reegan gets on the phone.)
REEGAN: Give me the direct line. This is Reegan. Listen, we're in trouble. Lennox has gone to UNIT. All right. You take care of Lennox, I'll take care of the Doctor.

[Space Control]

WOMAN: Fuel injection report. Fifty percent now loaded.
CORNISH: Fuel injection report acknowledged. Control to capsule, have you completed your instrument check?

[Recovery 7]

DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, everything seems to be working all right.
CORNISH [OC]: Capsule reports, is from systems at go.
DOCTOR: How much longer have I got to wait in here?
CORNISH [OC]: We are now zero minus thirty, three oh minutes.
DOCTOR: I take it you mean half an hour. How's the fuel situation?
CORNISH [OC]: We now have fifty, five oh percent inboard. We'll switch to the M3 variant at sixty five percent.
DOCTOR: Well, can't you hurry it up?

[Space Control]

CORNISH: We can't hurry the M3 variant.

[Recovery 7]

CORNISH [OC]: It's highly volatile.
DOCTOR: Well, I still think you could add a higher proportion of M3. And remember, the extra G-force wouldn't worry me.

[Space Control]

CORNISH: It would worry you if the rocket blew up on lift off.

[Recovery 7]

DOCTOR: Ah.

[Space Control]

CORNISH: I'm not taking the risk. 

[Space Centre Fuel Bay]

(A UNIT soldier stops a man in a boiler suit.)
PARKER: And where do you think you're going?
REEGAN: They want me at fuel control. There's a breakdown.
PARKER: That's news to me. Where's your pass?
(Reegan hands over a paper and promptly punches the soldier in the stomach and back of the neck, then carries him out of sight amongst the pipes. He climbs up one ladder then part way down another to sneak up on a man working a control valve. Reegan kicks him over the railing and he falls to the ground. Reegan then carries on through the maze of metal stairways to a tiny valve right at the top of the complex, turns it, and makes his escape.)

[Space Control]  

MAN: Life support systems check. All at go.
CORNISH: Life support systems at go, acknowledged.
WOMAN: Attention. Fuel injection malfunction.
CORNISH: Control to fuel bay. Check all fuel injection circuits.

[Recovery 7]

DOCTOR: Now what's the matter?
CORNISH [OC]: Temporary fuel injection malfunction. We're checking it out.

[Space Control]

WOMAN: Fuel injection systems now functioning normally.
CORNISH: It's all right, Doctor. It's self-rectified.
(Reegan has made it to the M3 variant valve. He turns that and several others as he clambers over the pipes.)

[UNIT HQ cell]

(Lennox is asleep when someone enters with a tray.)
SOLDIER: I've brought you some food.
LENNOX: Oh, thank you. Er, lock the door, won't you?
SOLDIER: Yes, I will.
(The soldier pulls the door shut, locks it and removes the key. Lennox takes the lid of the plate to reveal a radioactive isotope! He rushes for the emergency alarm button but the bell has just been disabled.)

[Space Centre Fuel Bay]

(The Brigadier is being driven by when they see Parker getting to his feet.)
BRIGADIER: What happened?
PARKER: The mechanic hit me. He's gone to the fuel bay.
(The Brigadier runs into the complex. He spots steam pouring from a pipe.)

[Space Control]

WOMAN: Final check completed. All systems now go.
CORNISH: You all set, Doctor? Lift off fifteen seconds.

[Recovery 7]

DOCTOR: It's about time, too.

[Space Control]

CORNISH: Right. Final countdown, now.
MAN: Ten, nine, eight, seven, six, five, four
BRIGADIER: Stop the countdown!
MAN: Three, two, one.
BRIGADIER: Controller, you must stop lift-off!
MAN: Zero.
(Launch vehicle GB-UK-R lifts Recovery 7 off the ground.)
CORNISH: It's too late!
MAN: We have lift off. We have lift off.
WOMAN: Lift-off speed, twenty percent in excess and rising.
CORNISH: Reduce fuel burn rate.
BRIGADIER: Sabotage in the fuel bay.
WOMAN: Fuel burn rate will not reduce.
MAN: Computer calculates fuel burn rate indicates forty eight percent in excess
CORNISH: Forty eight percent?
BRIGADIER: Why? What will happen?
CORNISH: Reduce flame apertures. At twenty percent in excess of planned lift-off speed, he'll blow himself out of Earth's orbit, go into the sun.
WOMAN: Apertures will not close on automatic owing to excessive heat. Lift-off speed now thirty percent in excess.
CORNISH: Doctor, can you operate manual control on flame aperture to reduce speed? Doctor, do you read me?
DOCTOR [on screen]: I can hear you. G-force hard to break.
CORNISH: Can you operate manual control?
DOCTOR [on screen]: I'll try.
WOMAN: Lift off speed now thirty-seven percent in excess.
MAN: Computer calculates capsule will go into sun orbit in fifteen minutes.
CORNISH: Doctor, are the controls responding?
DOCTOR [on screen]: No, there's no response. Must be the excess heat. Can you jettison stage one prematurely?
CORNISH: If we do that you may never get into orbit at all.
DOCTOR [on screen]: If you jettison stage one, there's a chance the excess momentum will put me into orbit.
CORNISH: A very thin chance.
DOCTOR [on screen]: It's better than going into orbit round the sun. Please jettison stage one now.
CORNISH: Jettison stage one now.
WOMAN: Stage one now jettisoned.
MAN: Radar check. Stage one exploded immediately after separation.

[Recovery 7]

(The Doctor is free of the extreme g-forces now.)
DOCTOR: Thank you, Mister Cornish, I'm very much obliged.

[Space Control]

WOMAN: Speed now reducing to normal. Stage two, fifteen seconds to separation.
DOCTOR [on screen]: Well, that seems to have done it. What went wrong, Mister Cornish?
CORNISH: Sabotage, Doctor. Too much M3 variant in the fuel.
DOCTOR [on screen]: They're very persistent, aren't they.
MAN: Stage two jettisoned.
CORNISH: Thirty second burn on stage three rocket, and you'll be in orbit.

[Recovery 7]

CORNISH [OC]: Control to Capsule. Do you have visual contact yet?
DOCTOR: If you mean can I see it, the answer is no.

[Space Control]

CORNISH: You are within half a mile of Mars Probe 7 and converging. Change attitude of capsule three degrees starboard now. Change attitude of capsule three degrees starboard now!

[Recovery 7]

DOCTOR: All right, all right. More haste less speed, Mister Cornish.
(Recovery 7 approaches the probe from the side.)
DOCTOR: I see it. I see it. Manoeuvring for link-up now.
(The two capsules kiss again.)
DOCTOR: Well, I've linked up all right. Moving through into Mars Probe 7 now.

[Space Control]

CORNISH: Doctor, be careful. We don't really now what's in there.

[Recovery 7]

DOCTOR: Nonsense man! Your three astronauts are in there. Injecting air into the tunnel now.

[Space Control]

WOMAN: Large unidentified object converging with Mars Probe 7 on collision course. Estimated speed seven thousand miles per hour, but decreasing.
CORNISH: Doctor, a large unidentified object is approaching you on collision course!

[Recovery 7]

CORNISH [OC]: Take evasive action!
(The Doctor spots the large, bright flying saucer through a porthole.)

Episode Six

[Space Control]

CORNISH: Doctor, can you see the object? What is it?

[Recovery 7]

DOCTOR: Some kind of space ship. It's enormous!
CORNISH [OC]: Can you evade it?
DOCTOR: I'll try.

[Space Control]

BRIGADIER: He hasn't got the speed!
CORNISH: He's still linked to Mars Probe 7.
BRIGADIER: How much fuel has he got for manoeuvring?
CORNISH: Precious little. What he's got he'll need for re-entry.
DOCTOR [OC]: It's closing in too fast! I can't
(On the radar screen, the two lights become one.)
BRIGADIER: They've collided.
CORNISH: If they had, the capsules would be smashed to fragments.

[Recovery 7]

ALIEN [OC]: You are not in danger.
DOCTOR: Where am I?
ALIEN [OC]: You are on board our spacecraft. Open your hatch and leave the capsule.
DOCTOR: What's happened to our three astronauts?
ALIEN [OC]: They are unharmed. Open your hatch and leave the capsule.
DOCTOR: Very well.
(The Doctor picks up his helmet.)
ALIEN [OC]: You will not need your life support systems. An environment has been prepared for you.

[Spaceship]

(The Doctor steps out of the hatch and sinks slowly to the floor of long curved passage.)
ALIEN [OC]: Go to the light.

[Spaceship room]

(A replica of the waiting/quarantine room at Space Control. Three astronauts are watching something on a screen, but to us it is blank.)
VAN LYDEN: Oh no!
MICHAELS: Oh no, another open goal!
LEFEE: Did you see it? I could have scored that!
VAN LYDEN: Oh, rubbish. Why aren't you playing then?
LEFEE: I don't need to. We're a goal ahead.
MICHAELS: Yes, but there's still time for us.
VAN LYDEN: He had all the time in the world. Why didn't he shoot? 
MICHAELS: Why didn't he use the wings more.
(The Doctor enters.)
LEFEE: Why indeed? That's what I want to know.
VAN LYDEN: We might as well get another team. Oh, hello. Come on in.
LEFEE: Oh, do you happen to know how long we're going to be kept here?
DOCTOR: What are you talking about?
MICHAELS: Hey, did you see this? Look, you're missing the game.
LEFEE: Never mind that. Turn it off.
VAN LYDEN: What do you mean turn it off? 
MICHAELS: Turn it off? No.
LEFEE: We were losing anyway.
VAN LYDEN: Oh, come on.
MICHAELS: Okay. But we still might have
LEFEE: No chance.
(Michaels 'turns off' the screen.)
VAN LYDEN: I say, any idea when we're going to see our families?
DOCTOR: Do you know where you are?
VAN LYDEN: Why, you ought to know.
DOCTOR: Please, do you know where you are?
VAN LYDEN: Yes, of course. I brought these two fellows back from Mars Probe 7. They slapped us in extended quarantine.
DOCTOR: You think you're on Earth, at the Space Centre?
LEFEE: (pointing out of the window) What do you think that is?
MICHAELS: Just what do you want?
DOCTOR: I came to take you back to Earth.
LEFEE: Oh yes?
VAN LYDEN: Back to Earth?
MICHAELS: Who let him in here?
DOCTOR: Now, please listen to me. You're not on Earth nor are you at the Space Centre. You're prisoners in an alien spaceship.
VAN LYDEN: Oh, come on!
DOCTOR: You came up here in Recovery 7 but you never made the journey back. Something happened.
VAN LYDEN: Something happened?
DOCTOR: Yes.
(There is an electronic sound. The men's faces go blank and they sit. The Doctor cannot attract their attention.)
DOCTOR: Van Lyden?
(The view from the window fades to reveal an alien looking in. It is a fuzzy view and we cannot see details.)
ALIEN : They cannot hear you.
DOCTOR: You've conditioned their minds.
ALIEN: It was necessary to for their health. They were deteriorating.
DOCTOR: Why have you taken them prisoner?
ALIEN: Why have you not returned our ambassadors?
DOCTOR: Ambassadors?
ALIEN: An agreement was made. You have betrayed us. Unless our ambassadors are returned, we shall destroy your world.
DOCTOR: Ambassadors!

[Space Control]

WOMAN: Radio telescope report from Jodrell Bank. Computer analyses as discoid, half a mile in diameter.
BRIGADIER: Half a mile wide? It must be a meteor.
CORNISH: Meteors don't stand still.
CARRINGTON: It's quite obviously an alien spacecraft. We must attack and destroy it.
BRIGADIER: What about the Doctor? If that is a spacecraft, he may be on board.
CARRINGTON: He must be dead by now. We could use missiles with atomic warheads.
CORNISH: Until we know for certain that
CARRINGTON: We do know. I've got a plane to catch. There's an emergency meeting of the Security Council in Geneva in an hour's time.
CORNISH: Security Council?
CARRINGTON: Yes, this object has been spotted by observers all over the world.
BRIGADIER: What are you going to tell the council, sir?
CARRINGTON: I shall recommend an immediate all out attack. We must defend ourselves while there is still time. (Carrington leaves.)
CORNISH: The man's mad.
BRIGADIER: Not necessarily. We don't know what that thing is there.
CORNISH: Then surely we should find out.
BRIGADIER: Perhaps someone's found out already.
CORNISH: What do you mean?
BRIGADIER: I have a feeling that General Carrington knows a great deal more than he's telling us. He went on a Mars probe himself, remember. Perhaps he discovered something.
CORNISH: Then why doesn't he tell us?
BRIGADIER: I don't know.
CORNISH: Are you supporting his plan to attack blindly?
BRIGADIER: No. I think we should wait. But there's only one hope left to us, that the Doctor is still alive.

[Spaceship room]

DOCTOR: What you tell me is appalling. The authorities on Earth had no knowledge of this.
ALIEN: That is difficult to believe.
DOCTOR: Nevertheless, you must believe me. Now let me go back to Earth, and I will give you my personal assurance that your ambassadors will be returned to you.
ALIEN: But you do not even know where they are.
DOCTOR: From the information that you've given me, I'll find them. Now, please, you must let me try.
ALIEN: Very well. But if our ambassadors are not returned, we shall use our weapons to destroy your world.
DOCTOR: These three men, can I take them back with me?
ALIEN: They will remain here until our ambassadors are returned. Now you can go back to your spaceship.
(The blinds reappear on the window and the men stand up.)
VAN LYDEN: Something happened?
DOCTOR: Yes. Look, I'll see what I can do about getting you out of quarantine as soon as I possibly can.
LEFEE: The sooner the better.
VAN LYDEN: Oh, good.
MICHAELS: Oh, er, send us something in to eat, will you?
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, all right. Don't worry. I'll look after everything.
LEFEE: Thanks.
VAN LYDEN: Thanks very much.
(The Doctor leaves.)
MICHAELS: We might just catch the end of this game.
MICHAELS: Should do.
VAN LYDEN: Ah, that's better. One all!

[Space Control]

WOMAN: The American space agency are now preparing to launch an unmanned capsule to observe the unidentified object.
CORNISH: What's the estimated launch time?
WOMAN: Will check.
MAN: Nancy Radio Telescope reports they have detected radio pulses being emitted by the object. Frequencies similar to those emitted by pulsars.
WOMAN: Estimated launch time for American unmanned capsule, six hours.
(The Brigadier enters.)
BRIGADIER: Anything happening?
CORNISH: The Americans are sending up an unmanned satellite. Did this man Lennox tell you anything?
BRIGADIER: He's been murdered.
CORNISH: In your own headquarters?
BRIGADIER: Someone put an isotope in his cell.
CORNISH: You're not having a great deal of success are you, Brigadier?
BRIGADIER: No.
CORNISH: The astronauts are still missing, Miss Shaw kidnapped, Doctor Taltalian killed and now this man Lennox murdered under your very nose.
BRIGADIER: We're following up every possible clue.
CORNISH: And what have you discovered?
BRIGADIER: We've identified the two radioactive bodies that were found in that gravel pit in Hertfordshire. They weren't foreign agents at all, they were petty London criminals. And the explosive that killed Doctor Taltalian was the new H37 compound which hasn't even been issued to the Army yet.
CORNISH: Then our own people could be involved.
BRIGADIER: That was the Doctor's theory. Also forensics have analysed the mud that was found on the shoes Lennox was wearing.
CORNISH: And what does that tell you?
BRIGADIER: Well, it could tell us where he'd been recently. You see, there were elements of insecticide in that mud. We're now checking all the areas where that insecticide is used.
CORNISH: This isotope that killed Lennox, have you checked on that?
BRIGADIER: It was part of a consignment sold some months ago.
CORNISH: Who was the buyer?
BRIGADIER: A bogus company with an address that doesn't even exist.
CORNISH: You've been very thorough.
BRIGADIER: It doesn't seem to have got me anywhere.
MAN: Urgent message. Pulses from unidentified object have ceased.
DOCTOR [OC]: Hello, Space Control? Can you hear me?
CORNISH: Control to Recovery 7. We read you loud and clear.
BRIGADIER: Doctor! Are you all right?
DOCTOR [on screen]: Yes, thank you.
CORNISH: Doctor, have you found the astronauts?
DOCTOR [on screen]: Yes. They're safe and well. I'm not going to say any more at the moment, it's not safe.
CORNISH: Doctor
DOCTOR [on screen]: I shall maintain radio silence until the necessary landing instructions.
BRIGADIER: Have you found out what's behind all this?
DOCTOR [on screen]: Brigadier, put all your men on stand by. I shall explain everything to you when I land.
CORNISH: Doctor, what happened to my astronauts? Control to Recovery 7. Do you read me?
BRIGADIER: It's no good, Cornish. He won't talk until he wants to. I must get on to my headquarters.
CORNISH: This is Control. Recovery 7 is now approaching re-entry orbit. I repeat, Recovery 7 is now approaching re-entry orbit.

[Underground laboratory]

(In the isolation chamber, Liz is putting out another isotope for the aliens. They move to stop her leaving, then the one wearing Lafee's suit removes its helmet. The face looks like it had melted. Liz thumps on the observation window and rushes out of the chamber. Masters closes the door after her. Reegan comes down the stairs.)
REEGAN: What's the matter with you?
LIZ: Look!
REEGAN: Ugly looking fellow, isn't he?
LIZ: You knew they weren't human.
REEGAN: I had a pretty good idea.
LIZ: What have you got them here for?
REEGAN: I was paid to.
LIZ: Who by?
REEGAN: That doesn't matter. I've got a few ideas of my own.
LIZ: Like robbing Fort Knox?
REEGAN: Or the Bank of England or anywhere, like.
LIZ: Is that what this boss of yours wants you to do?
REEGAN: It doesn't matter what he likes. We've got them.
LIZ: We?
REEGAN: There's a vacancy. Doctor Lennox met with an accident at headquarters.
LIZ: You killed him.
REEGAN: I never laid a finger on him. Well?
LIZ: Are you offering me a job?
REEGAN: What about it?
LIZ: What's the alternative?
REEGAN: I kill you and buy myself another scientist.
(The phone rings.)
REEGAN: Think about it. Reegan? Oh, it's you, sir. Doctor's on his way down, is he? I did my best to stop him going up. You're sure you want him dead? He could be useful to us. All right, I'll see to him. Your friend the Doctor's on his way back from a little journey. I'm going to be his reception committee.

[Space Control]

MAN: Drop speed now thirty miles per hour and reducing.
WOMAN: Capsule drifting on course. No rectification needed.
BRIGADIER: How long before he's down?
CORNISH: Four point five minutes. He's making a perfect descent, right on the touchdown pad.
BRIGADIER: I'll go and meet him.
CORNISH: He'll have to go through decontamination first.
BRIGADIER: Well, how long's that going to take?
CORNISH: Under an hour.
BRIGADIER: An hour?
CORNISH: Think yourself lucky. It used to take two days.
MAN: Drop speed now twenty two miles per hour, reducing to eighteen.
WOMAN: Height one mile. Drift rate three knots and still on course. Radar contact lost. Radar contact lost.
MAN: Visual contact. Capsule approaching touchdown pad.

[Space Control guard post]

(There are two soldiers on guard as the Silcock Bakeries van drives up. Reegan shows an ID.)
SOLDIER: That's okay. Carry on.

[Space Control]

MAN: We have touchdown. We have touchdown.
CORNISH: Disconnect parachutes.
WOMAN: Parachutes disconnected. (The van pulls up alongside the Decontamination Unit Ventilation System. Reegan is wearing Space Control whites and consults a map, then gets a coil of clear hose from the van and attaches it to a valve. The other end is fastened to something in the van.)

[Space Control]

MAN: Astronaut now entering decontamination.
CORNISH: You can relax. It won't be long now.

[Decontamination unit]

(The Doctor enters wearing a bathrobe and takes his clothes down off their hangers. Reegan goes back to the van and turns on the valve of a gas cylinder. Now fully dressed, the Doctor speaks into a microphone.)
DOCTOR: Right, I'm ready when you are.
CORNISH [OC]: Just a few minutes more, Doctor. We're waiting for final test results.
DOCTOR: Anything you say, Mister Cornish.
(The Doctor lies on a bunk as gas hisses into the room. He starts coughing and tries to sit up, but just falls off the bunk onto the floor. Reegan checks his watch then turns off the gas. Moments later he enters the room wearing a small gasmask and picks up the Doctor.)

[Space Control]

WOMAN: Decontamination report. All tests negative.
CORNISH: Good. All right, Doctor, you're cleared. Doctor, do you read me? Doctor?
BRIGADIER: Doctor, are you all right? I'm going over there.
(Meanwhile the van drives away.)

[Decontamination unit]

(The gas is still in the room when the Brigadier enters. He speaks into the microphone.)
BRIGADIER: Cornish. He's gone.
CORNISH [OC]: Maybe he's on his way back to Control.
BRIGADIER: No. Look, there's gas in here. Seal off all the gates!

[Space Control guard post]

(A staff car drives in as the van comes out. The soldier recognises it and lets it through, then the phone in the guard box rings.)
SOLDIER: Main gate? Oh, but

[Space Control]

CARRINGTON: Are you sure he's been abducted? He could have left of his own accord.
BRIGADIER: There was a gas cylinder linked to the ventilation system.
CARRINGTON: It could be a blind to make us think he'd been kidnapped.
CORNISH: Now why should he do that?
CARRINGTON: Did it occur to you that all these troubles only started when this Doctor came on the scene?
BRIGADIER: With respect, sir, that is simply not true.
CARRINGTON: He insists on going up in Recovery 7, makes contact with the alien vessel, then disappears as soon as he lands. Can you explain that?
CORNISH: Do you really think that the Doctor is one of the people behind all this?
CARRINGTON: What do you know about this Doctor, Mister Cornish?
CORNISH: Oh, only that he's an associate of the Brigadier.
CARRINGTON: Exactly. Well, Brigadier? Where does this man come from?
BRIGADIER: That's difficult to explain, sir.
CARRINGTON: How long have you known him?
BRIGADIER: Several years, on and off.
CARRINGTON: On and off. What's his job exactly?
BRIGADIER: He's given my organisation a great deal of help in the past.
CARRINGTON: You're being deliberately unhelpful, Brigadier. I intend to have this Doctor investigated.
BRIGADIER: We shall have to find him first, sir.
CARRINGTON: The sooner you do that the better. If he has any explanation to offer as to what that object is, we need to know it at once. Contact me as soon as you find him.
CORNISH: General? How did the Security Council meeting in Geneva go?
CARRINGTON: Complete waste of time. They're still debating.
CORNISH: And what do you think they should do?
CARRINGTON: Arm every available missile with atomic warheads and blast that thing out of our skies!
CORNISH: Isn't that a bit extreme?
CARRINGTON: It's our moral duty.
(Carrington leaves.)
BRIGADIER: I think the General's a bit overwrought.
CORNISH: I think he's insane.

[Underground laboratory]

(Reegan is reporting to his boss on the phone. The Doctor is lying on the floor.)
REEGAN: No trouble at all. Your Doctor friend's as dead as a doornail.
(He puts the phone down.)
LIZ: Why do you say he's dead?
REEGAN: Because it suits me. How is he?
DOCTOR: I'm none the better for your attentions. Liz?
LIZ: Doctor, are you all right?
DOCTOR: Yes, and getting better by the minute. How are you? Did they hurt you at all?
LIZ: No. I don't much care for the company, though.
DOCTOR: Well, I don't blame you.
(Liz helps the Doctor stand up.)
DOCTOR: Ah, there they are.
LIZ: Doctor, they're a completely alien species.
DOCTOR: Yes, I know. I've been aboard their spaceship. I've talked to their Captain.
REEGAN: How did you talk to them?
DOCTOR: They have some kind of translation machine.
REEGAN: Like this?
DOCTOR: Oh, no. No, that's a much simpler model. That would only receive one-way signals.
REEGAN: Could you build me a better one so I could really talk to them?
DOCTOR: I dare say, if I had the proper equipment. I was going to build one. Never did get a chance to get round to it.
REEGAN: You've got your chance now.
DOCTOR: You expect me to help you?
REEGAN: It would keep you both alive.
DOCTOR: Well, I shall need a lot of expensive equipment.
REEGAN: Make a list.
DOCTOR: Very well. Thank you.
(The Doctor starts writing as Reegan goes up the stairs and opens the door. The Doctor points at the phone and Liz shakes her head. The Doctor goes to the stairs but Reegan is standing at the top.)
REEGAN: Don't try it.
(Reegan leaves.)
DOCTOR: Is there a way out?
LIZ: I got out once, but they caught me. Now they've doubled the guards.
DOCTOR: Right, let's get on with that list.
LIZ: Are you really going to help them?
DOCTOR: Well, if we can't get out to the Brigadier, we must bring the Brigadier to us.
(Carrington enters.)
LIZ: General Carrington!
CARRINGTON: Miss Shaw.
LIZ: How on Earth did you find us?
(Then the penny drops.)
DOCTOR: I think the General knew all along.
CARRINGTON: You're not surprised to see me?
DOCTOR: Not particularly, no.
CARRINGTON: I'm surprised to see you, Doctor. My instructions were that you were to be killed.
DOCTOR: Then somebody disobeyed your instructions, didn't they.
CARRINGTON: I shall have to attend to the matter myself. I'm sorry, Doctor. It's my moral duty.
(Carrington points his pistol at the Doctor's head.)

Episode Seven

[Underground laboratory]

(Reegan enters.)
REEGAN: What are you doing?
CARRINGTON: You told me you killed this man.
REEGAN: I was going to, but
CARRINGTON: You disobeyed an order.
REEGAN: I thought it was for the best.
CARRINGTON: You're not paid to think, Reegan.
REEGAN: He can be useful.
CARRINGTON: I make the decisions.
REEGAN: Yes, sir, but he's the only one that can make a machine that will let us talk to these creatures.
CARRINGTON: You've got a machine to do that.
REEGAN: This thing only sends limited one way signals. Look, if I'm going to carry out your orders, I'll have to give them some pretty complicated information. Still, suit yourself. You want to kill him, kill him.
(After a pause, Carrington holsters his pistol.)
CARRINGTON: Could you make us a better machine?
DOCTOR: Given the necessary equipment, yes.
CARRINGTON: And you're willing to help us?
DOCTOR: It depends on what you're trying to do.
LIZ: Doctor!
DOCTOR: Liz! Well, General?
CARRINGTON: We must alert the world to the menace of an alien invasion.
DOCTOR: When do you expect this invasion?
CARRINGTON: At any time.
DOCTOR: They told me that their intentions were peaceful. That these three beings here were ambassadors.
CARRINGTON: Ambassadors! That was just to put us off our guard.
DOCTOR: You're convinced their intentions are hostile, then?
CARRINGTON: Why else should they invade the galaxy? They were on Mars before we were.
DOCTOR: Ah, so that's when you met them. When you were on a previous Mars Probe.
CARRINGTON: Yes, they killed Jim. Jim Daniels, fellow astronaut, simply by touching him.
DOCTOR: Yes, but they didn't know their touch would kill human beings.
CARRINGTON: And now they've walked into my trap. I knew that once I got them here I'd make them reveal their true natures.
DOCTOR: So it was you who sent for those three ambassadors, was it?
LIZ: And hired Reegan to kidnap them and use them as killers?
CARRINGTON: It was the only way to arouse public opinion.
DOCTOR: Was Sir James Quinlan in on this?
CARRINGTON: No. He just wanted the political glory of being the first to arrange contact with an intelligent alien species. He didn't know of my plan to save the world. He wouldn't have understood.
LIZ: What about Van Lyden and the other astronauts? The human ones?
CARRINGTON: They didn't know either. It was the only way.
DOCTOR: Well, I must say you've been very thorough, General.
CARRINGTON: It was the only way. You do understand that, don't you, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, I understand. You had to do what you had to do.
CARRINGTON: Exactly. We must protect the world. It's our moral duty. Will you help us?
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, I'll build your machine for you.
CARRINGTON: Splendid! This man can be of use to us. Give him everything he needs.
REEGAN: Okay.
CARRINGTON: I'm going to take one of those creatures with me. I've brought a shielded van. Kindly ask one of them to come out.
REEGAN: Open the door.

[Space Control]

WOMAN: American space agency report their unmanned observation satellite is now within three miles of the UFO.
BRIGADIER: Why can't they get a picture?

CORNISH: Well, I assume the radio signals that thing emits are affecting the cameras.
WOMAN: Space agency are now about to manoeuvre the satellite down to one mile from the UFO.

[Underground laboratory]

CARRINGTON: I've got some instructions for you. You're to raid a number of isotope stores.
REEGAN: Have I?
CARRINGTON: Everything you need here. Passes, maps. Just follow your orders.
REEGAN: Yes, sir.

[Space Control]

WOMAN: Space agency report total cessation of all signals from observation satellite. It is believed satellite has disintegrated.
BRIGADIER: Right, sir. (puts down phone) General Carrington's men have captured an alien astronaut. He's going to bring it here.

[Underground laboratory]

REEGAN: How's it going? Got everything you need?
DOCTOR: Mmm hmm.
REEGAN: How long's it going to take?
DOCTOR: Look, I'm not building a crystal set, you know.
(Masters opens the isolation chamber door.)
LIZ: Doctor.
(Reegan uses his simple device to bring the aliens out.)
DOCTOR: Look, if you let them out, how am I going to test it?
REEGAN: They'll be back.
DOCTOR: What, more killing?
REEGAN: Only if we have to. Get on with it. I want that machine finished by the time I get back.
(Reegan and Masters leave with the aliens.)
LIZ: You're not just going to do as he tells you?
DOCTOR: Come on, Liz, let's get on with it. We haven't got much time, you know.
(Reegan lets the aliens out at an unsuspecting government facility. One security guard is killed when the aliens open the gates. The other rushes into his hut and gets on the phone. An alarm blares out as Reegan drives the van in.)

[Space Control communications room]

(An alien is strapped to a chair behind an opaque screen.)
WAKEFIELD: We'll be ready for your live telecast very soon, General.
CARRINGTON: Splendid!
WAKEFIELD: Are you sure your men will be able to remove the helmet?
CARRINGTON: Quite sure.
WAKEFIELD: If there is some sort of alien creature inside that spacesuit
CARRINGTON: As I can assure you there is.
WAKEFIELD: Has it occurred to you, sir, that this may create world panic?
(Reegan gets a large crate labelled Isotope Radioactive and gets it back to the van on an electric trolley. The police arrive at the main gate so Reegan orders the aliens to attack. Then they all get in the van and drive off. One policeman recovers enough to avoid being run down.)

[Space Control communications room]

CARRINGTON: Yes, Brigadier?
BRIGADIER: Aliens have raided an isotope factory. Several deaths.
CARRINGTON: You see? They've already landed. These creatures need radiation to live and they're prepared to rob and murder to get it.
BRIGADIER: Sir!
CARRINGTON: Yes.
BRIGADIER: There were men helping them.
CARRINGTON: Traitors. Collaborators, like your friend the Doctor.
BRIGADIER: That is an unjustified assumption, sir!
CARRINGTON: Is it?
WAKEFIELD: General, what exactly do you intend to say in your telecast? It'll be on a world wide hook-up, you know.
CARRINGTON: I shall call on the nations of the world to unite in an attack on the aliens and their spacecraft. It must be obliterated!

[Underground laboratory]

(Everyone is back safely. The Doctor is finishing off a console.)
DOCTOR: All right?
LIZ: Mmm hmm.
DOCTOR: Right, switch on the power, Liz, will you?
LIZ: Okay.
DOCTOR: All right? Right, let's try and test this thing.
LIZ: (sotto) Do you think the signal will be strong enough?
DOCTOR: (sotto) Well, I've boosted it as much as I possibly can. (normal) Just go over there, will you, Liz?
LIZ: Right.
DOCTOR: See if they react at all.
(The Doctor uses a type of morse code. Lights flash on the pad.)
DOCTOR: Any reaction?
LIZ: No, not yet.
DOCTOR: Well, we'll just have to keep on trying, won't we.
(The Doctor gestures Masters to watch the observation room too, as he taps out his message - di di di dah dah dah di di di.)

[UNIT Communications room]

JOHNSON: There you are, Sarge. Have a listen.
(Benton puts the headset to his ear.)
BENTON: Well, it's SOS. We did away with that signal years ago.
JOHNSON: Everybody's picking it up, Sarge. Taxis, police cars, fire engines. It's on a high-impulse blanket frequency.
BENTON: See if you can get a triangulation on it. Save our souls?

[Space Control communications room]

WAKEFIELD: This is John Wakefield talking to you live from the heart of Britain's Space Control headquarters. This telecast is being received in homes all over the world by communications satellite relay. Right, now after that, I shall introduce the General. When I've introduced him, I want you to pick him up over there. All right?
CORNISH: Mister Wakefield?
WAKEFIELD: Just a minute. Yes, Professor?
CORNISH: Do you really think you should go ahead with this broadcast?
WAKEFIELD: What do you mean?
CORNISH: Well, do you realise what the General is going to say?
WAKEFIELD: He's going to talk about that unidentified flying object.
CORNISH: He is going to call on the nations of the world to attack it. Blast it out of the sky with missiles.

[Underground laboratory]

REEGAN: Haven't you finished yet?
DOCTOR: Oh, we're just about to test it. Liz, you stand by the controls, will you?
LIZ: Right.
(The Doctor takes a microphone with him to the observation window.)
DOCTOR: Now, we are trying to convert our speech into your radio impulses. Can you understand me? We are trying to convert our human speech into your radio impulses. Can you understand me?
REEGAN: It doesn't work.
DOCTOR: Can you understand me? Please try to answer.
(The aliens walk to the window.)
ALIEN: Why are we kept prisoners? Why do you make us kill?
REEGAN: You'll obey my orders. If you don't, we'll let you die.
ALIEN: We are ambassadors and came in peace.
REEGAN: If you want to live, you'll do exactly what you're told. Congratulations, Doctor. Now, I can make a few plans.
(The Doctor reaches for the console.)
REEGAN: Leave it alone.

[Space Control]

WOMAN: Unidentified object transmitting to us. Picture coming through now.
(The image on the screen is loaded with static.)
ALIEN [on screen]: Only a little time remains to you. We have powers to destroy your planet totally, which we shall use if our ambassadors are not returned.
(Transmission ends.)
CARRINGTON: Now we know where we stand, gentlemen. We must attack first!
(In the lab, Masters is keeping his gun trained on the Doctor and Liz.)
CARRINGTON: I must make my broadcast at once.
WAKEFIELD: But that's impossible, General. The worldwide hook-up won't be ready for another hour yet.
CARRINGTON: You must speed it up. Get on to your people. This is an emergency.
CORNISH: Wakefield, what are you going to do?
WAKEFIELD: See if I can speed up the broadcast, of course.
BRIGADIER: There's been a message from my HQ, sir. They're picking up SOS radio signals.
CARRINGTON: Well?
BRIGADIER: There's a chance it may be from the Doctor, sir. I'd like to follow it up, if you'll excuse me.
CARRINGTON: Just a moment!
BRIGADIER: Sir?
CARRINGTON: You think I don't know what's going on, don't you?
BRIGADIER: I don't quite follow you?
CARRINGTON: That Doctor of yours is in league with these creatures and you've been helping him. Security! Place this officer under close arrest.
BRIGADIER: Sir, I must protest!
CARRINGTON: Hand over your revolver, Brigadier.
(The Brigadier gives his gun to an MP.)
CARRINGTON: I've suspected you for some time. All your UNIT people have been locked up and replaced by men I can trust. Take him away.
(As the Brigadier is escorted out, Cornish picks up a telephone.)
CARRINGTON: What are you doing?
CORNISH: I'm getting on to the Ministry.
CARRINGTON: Too late, Mister Cornish. All communications are under my control.
CORNISH: This Space Centre is under my control.
CARRINGTON: Not any longer.
(The Brigadier marches along the tunnel in front of the two MPs. Suddenly he elbows one in the stomach and hits the other, then runs to a staff car whilst they shoot at him. He is let through the barrier just as the phone rings in the guards hut. Again.)

[UNIT Communications room]

JOHNSON: It's no good, Sarge, I can't raise them. Space HQ have cut themselves off.
BENTON: Well, keep trying.
(The Brigadier enters.)
BENTON: Sir, we've been trying to reach you.
BRIGADIER: Those SOS signals. Did you get a fix on them?
BENTON: They cut out suddenly. We managed to pin them down around here. It's funny, sir. It's army land. Disused firing range.
BRIGADIER: Carrington.
BENTON: It's quite near the Space Centre.
BRIGADIER: How many men have we got here, Sergeant?
BENTON: Just one or two, sir. Most of the lads are on duty at the Space Centre.
BRIGADIER: I'll take what men there are. Look, keep that radio manned and get me a revolver, will you?
BENTON: Sir.
BRIGADIER: And lay on a jeep.
BENTON: We can't, sir. All the transport's over at Space HQ.
BRIGADIER: What?
BENTON: Well, how did you get here, sir?
BRIGADIER: I borrowed a staff car.
BENTON: Well, couldn't we use that?
BRIGADIER: Sergeant, that engine stopped quite a few bullets. I barely made it here. Well, there must be some kind of transport?
BENTON: Sir, there is the Doctor's car.

[Outside the Underground laboratory]

(Bessie is bristling with rifles like a 30s Chicago mobsters flivver. The Brigadier surveys the area with binoculars then drives in closer. Masters and Flynn come out, see them and run for the van. A gunfight starts, but UNIT have more bullets. The bad guys surrender.)
BRIGADIER: Right, get them!
(Two UNIT soldiers walk up to them, and get their rifles taken. Masters gets shot in the shoulder and the Brigadier tackles Flynn from behind. They trade punches until the Brigadier sends him rolling down a steep slope. His remaining soldier goes with him to the blockhouse.)

[Underground laboratory]

REEGAN: Now, you see, the main vault is here, and our friends there can blast it open.
DOCTOR: Look, how many times must I tell you? I am not joining you in a programme of bank robbery.
REEGAN: I'm offering you an equal share, Doctor.
(Gunfire.)
REEGAN: See what's happening.
(A thug runs up the stairs as the Brigadier bursts through the door. He is shot, and falls back down the stairs. Reegan gets his pistol out, but the Brigadier shoots it out of his hand.)
REEGAN: Make yourselves at home.
DOCTOR: What kept you?
BRIGADIER: I see you're all right, Doctor. Miss Shaw?
LIZ: Just get me out of here.
BRIGADIER: Carrington's taken over the Space Centre.
DOCTOR: What for?
BRIGADIER: He's going to make a telecast urging the world to attack the alien spaceship.
DOCTOR: We've got to stop him at once.
BRIGADIER: Not so easy. He's arrested all my men and moved in his own troops.
DOCTOR: We've got to get in there somehow.
REEGAN: Why don't you use them?
DOCTOR: You know, I think he's right.
REEGAN: You won't forget I thought of it?
BRIGADIER: Get him out of here.
(Reegan is taken away as the Doctor picks up the microphone and switches on his comm unit.)
DOCTOR: Now, we're going to return you to your own people, but first we need your help to prevent a catastrophe.

[Space Control guard post]

(The place is locked down. The Brigadier uses a megaphone to shout at the MPs from a distance.)
BRIGADIER: Open the gates. Open these gates!
(The MPs stand their ground, so UNIT let the aliens out of the van. The Doctor uses his comm unit to advice them.)
DOCTOR: Open the gates. Please try not to harm anyone.
(The MPs start shooting.)
DOCTOR: These aliens are invulnerable to your bullets. They will not harm you but you will die if you touch them. Now please, keep back.
(The aliens lift the barrier and walk through. The MPs retreat. Everyone gets back into Bessie as the aliens touch the main doors, blowing the locks, and they swing open to let the vehicles through.)

[Space Control communications room]

CARRINGTON: When I move across to here, get your camera in close on this creature and my men will forcibly remove his helmet. I want the world to know what these monsters look like.
WAKEFIELD: All right, General, whatever you say.
CARRINGTON: Good man.
CORNISH: General, you must see reason. You can't make this broadcast.
CARRINGTON: Mister Cornish, don't interfere in things you don't understand.
CORNISH: It could bring down total destruction on us.
CARRINGTON: You have no concept of moral duty.
CORNISH: General, you must see
CARRINGTON: Security!
(Cornish is dragged away by the MPs.)
WAKEFIELD: Five seconds to go, General. This is John Wakefield, speaking to you live from the heart of Britain's Space Control headquarters. This telecast is being received in homes all over the world by communications satellite relay.
(Gunshots off.)
WAKEFIELD: Owing to widespread rumours concerning an unidentified flying object hovering above this planet, General Carrington, head of Space security, himself an ex-astronaut and Mars probe veteran, is about to speak to you on a matter of tremendous importance.
(The woman in the control room screams.)

[Space Control]

CARRINGTON: They're here! We're being invaded!
(Carrington shoots at the aliens.)
CARRINGTON: Security patrol!
(Carrington runs out of bullets. The Brigadier enters, followed by the Doctor and Benton. Other armed UNIT soldiers appear.)
BRIGADIER: It's no good, General. I've released my men. This place is in my hands.
CARRINGTON: I must make this broadcast. It's a matter of world survival.
BRIGADIER: I'm sorry, General. I must place you under arrest.
CARRINGTON: Arrest?
(Carrington hands his empty gun to Benton, and gives the Brigadier his revolver back.)
BRIGADIER: The Sergeant will look after you.
(Carrington stops in front of the Doctor.)
CARRINGTON: I had to do what I did. It was my moral duty. You do understand, don't you?
DOCTOR: Yes, General. I understand.
(The Doctor walks over to the communications room door.)
DOCTOR: Please release that gentleman.
(The opaque screens around the alien lift and the figure with it unties it from the chair.)
DOCTOR: Right, Mister Cornish, we've got to get a message up to that alien space ship and tell them that their ambassadors are safe and well.
CORNISH: Doctor, where are my three astronauts?
DOCTOR: My dear chap, they're still up there. But don't worry, they're all right. They're quite safe. Now, we've got to make an exchange.
CORNISH: Exchange?
(The three aliens now stand together.)
DOCTOR: We'll send these three up in Recovery 7. They'll send down our three astronauts.
CORNISH: But what about the fuel problem?
DOCTOR: Well, simple. We'll use pure M3 variant. And don't forget, they're not susceptible to g-force.
CORNISH: This is Control. Get me the fuel bay.
DOCTOR: Well goodbye, Mister Cornish. I've got a lot of work to do in my own laboratory.
CORNISH: Doctor, I'll need your help to communicate with the ambassadors.
DOCTOR: Well, here you are. Here's Miss Shaw. She's much more practical than I am. Goodbye Brigadier.
BRIGADIER: Thank you, Doctor.
LIZ: Goodbye, Doctor.
DOCTOR: (to aliens) Goodbye, gentlemen. Have a nice trip.

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