Terror of the Autons

Original Airdate: 2 Jan, 1971

Episode One

[Circus]

(A little man in a bowler hat watches the customers enter the big top of the International Circus. He walks round the back, past the lion's cage and finds a quiet spot to light up a small cigar. We hear the sound of the Tardis materialising and a motor horse box suddenly appears in the open ground before him. Agog, the man walks over and looks round it while a trim man in black suit and gloves, and with a neat beard gets out.)
ROSSINI: (Italian) Who the heck are you? Well?
MASTER: I am usually referred to as the Master.
ROSSINI: Oh? Is that so?
MASTER: Universally.
ROSSINI: Well, I am Luigi Rossini, internationally, and conjurers I don't need. Okay?
MASTER: Unfortunately I need you, Lew Russell.
ROSSINI: (London) What did you call me?
MASTER: Lew Russell. It happens to be your real name.
ROSSINI: Now listen, Mister. Get off my pitch while you're still safe!.
MASTER: Why, you insolent primitive.
ROSSINI: Oh, so you it want the hard way, do you? Right.
(Rossini goes to grab the Master, but it is his wrist that is taken in a vice-like grip. Rossini is forced to his knees and their eyes meet. After a few moments the Master lets Rossini go and walks a few steps, then snaps his fingers. Rossini gets up and follows.)

[National Space Museum]

(The Master breaks a display case containing a Nestene sphere.)
MUSEUM ATTENDANT: Here, you! What do you think you're doing?
(Rossini knocks the attendant out.)

[UNIT Laboratory]

(The Doctor is working inside the Tardis.)
DOCTOR [OC]: (sings) I don't want to set the world on fire!
(Bang! and smoke comes out of the open Tardis door, followed by the Doctor carrying a piece of dematerialisation mechanism. He goes to the lab bench and places it in a device clearly designed to hold the three legged item. There is a knock at the door.)
DOCTOR: Not today, thank you.
(Jo Grant enters, carrying a file.)
JO: Doctor, I, er
DOCTOR: I said not today, thank you.
(The Doctor switches on his contraption and it goes fizz. There is more smoke.)
DOCTOR: Oh, no.
(Jo grabs a fire extinguisher and uses it on the contraption.)
DOCTOR: Oh no!
JO: It's all right. I've dealt with it.
DOCTOR: Dealt with it? You've ruined it!
JO: But your bench was on fire.
DOCTOR: Three months delicate work and now look at it, you ham-fisted bungler.
JO: But this whole place might have gone up in flames.
DOCTOR: My dear young lady, steady state micro-welding always creates more smoke than fire.
JO: Steady state micro-welding?
DOCTOR: Yes. An advanced engineering technique pioneered by the Lammerdenes. A remarkably gifted race. They have nine opposable digits.
JO: Nine what?
DOCTOR: Nine opposable digits. Yes, well, never mind. Look, I said I don't want any tea today, thank you.
JO: I'm not the tea lady.
DOCTOR: Then what the blazes are you doing in here?
JO: I've
DOCTOR: Don't you know this area is strictly out of bounds to everybody except the tea lady and the Brigadier's personal staff?
JO: I'm your new assistant.
DOCTOR: Oh, no.
JO: The Brigadier sent me along to introduce myself, Doctor. Josephine Grant.
DOCTOR: How do you do, Miss Grant? I really don't think you're suitable.
JO: I'm a fully qualified agent, you know. Cryptology, safe breaking, explosives.
DOCTOR: Fire fighting? Yes, well, I'm sorry, my dear, but what I need is a scientist.
JO: I took general science at A-Level.
DOCTOR: Yes, I'm sure you did, but, even so.
JO: I'm sorry I ruined your experiment.
DOCTOR: That's all right.
(Jo brings the file over to the bench.)
DOCTOR: Look, Miss Grant, I've got a great deal of work to do. You must excuse me.
JO: The Brigadier wanted me to show you this report.
DOCTOR: Mmm?
JO: Something was stolen for the Natural Space Museum. It was on loan from this HQ.
DOCTOR: Oh, what was?
JO: A translucent polyhedron, eight and a half inches in diameter.
(The Doctor grabs the file.)
DOCTOR: Well, that's the Nestene's energy unit. It should never have left this building.
JO: Apparently they wanted it for a special display. The Brigadier signed the authorisation.
DOCTOR: The Brigadier's an idiot! I knew I should have destroyed that thing but somehow it would have felt like murder.
JO: You mean it was alive?
DOCTOR: Yes, in a way. Yes, that container held a form of alien intelligence.
JO: But you've just got to be joking.
DOCTOR: There's precious little to joke about, Miss Grant. That thing is appallingly dangerous.
JO: But who would want to steal it?
DOCTOR: Exactly. Who and why?

[Beacon Hill Telescope Control]

(Two radio telescopes and several microwave relay towers are dotted about at the site of the Ministry of Technology's Beacon Hill Research Establishment. A man in a brown suit climbs the long metal staircases to a control cabin in amongst them and enters. The bearded man in a white lab coat speaks first.)
GOODGE: I told her again last night.
PHILIPS: Hmm?
GOODGE: Elsie. Cut out the hard-boiled eggs, I said. Quite apart from their effects on my digestion, they're aesthetically boring.
PHILIPS: Uh huh.
(Goodge takes a paper tape printout from a computer as the Master looks in through the window.)
GOODGE: Here you are.
PHILIPS: Oh, thank you, Goodge.
GOODGE: Will there be anything else?
PHILIPS: Er, not for the moment. Oh, by the way, talking of eggs, I want a four hour scan below the hydrogen line tomorrow.
GOODGE: All right.
PHILIPS: I'll give you the precise wavelength later.
(Philips leaves and heads back to the ground. Goodge gets out his thermos and lunch box. There are two hard boiled eggs in with his sandwich. The Master enters and points a light-emitting device at the back of Goodge's head. A sort of evil sonic screwdriver. Philips arrives in the main control room as the Master brings a UNIT ammo box into telescope control and takes out the Nestene energy unit. He plugs it into a control panel then reorients the radio telescopes.)

[Beacon Hill Main Control]

(An oscilloscope starts up. Philips gets on the intercom.)
PHILIPS: Goodge! What the blazes is happening?

[Beacon Hill Telescope Control]

PHILIPS [OC]: Goodge, do you hear me?
(The energy unit is active.)

[Beacon Hill Main Control]

PHILIPS: The shaft angling code has gone crazy. Are you there, man? Check the feed back control!

[Beacon Hill Telescope Control]

(The signal peaks and the Master switches off the telescope controls. The energy sphere is beeping very quickly.)
PHILIPS [OC]: Goodge! What the devil do you think you're playing at?
(Philips enters and is transfixed by the Master's Look.)

[UNIT Laboratory]

BRIGADIER: You've been agitating for a new assistant ever since Miss Shaw went back to Cambridge.
DOCTOR: Liz was a highly qualified scientist. I want someone with the same qualifications.
BRIGADIER: Nonsense. What you need, Doctor, as Miss Shaw herself so often remarked, is someone to pass you your test tubes and to tell you how brilliant you are. Miss Grant will fulfil that function admirably.
DOCTOR: Well, what's the girl doing here anyway? UNIT's no place for trainees.
BRIGADIER: No, I couldn't agree more, Doctor, but Miss Grant was very keen to join us and she happens to have relatives in high places.
DOCTOR: So you tried to palm her off onto me. Well, it won't work, Brigadier. I'll have a properly qualified assistant or none at all.
BRIGADIER: Very well, Doctor. I'll reassign her.
DOCTOR: Good.
BRIGADIER: But I think you should break the news to her yourself.
DOCTOR: Well, now, wait a minute.
(Jo enters.)
JO: Hi, Doc. I. Good morning, sir.
BRIGADIER: Good morning, Miss Grant.
JO: I've checked all incoming reports. Still nothing on the stolen meteorite.
BRIGADIER: Thank you.
JO: And I've chased those electronic spares you wanted. They promised delivery tomorrow, without fail.
DOCTOR: Miss Grant, I, er, I, er. Well, I don't. This is, er, a bit difficult for me to say but. Er. Thank you, Jo. I can see you're going to be of great help to me.
JO: Thank you, Doctor. Report from one our field sections, sir. Captain Yates. Some kind of sabotage at a radio telescope. Two of their scientists have disappeared.
DOCTOR: Let me see that. (reads) We'd better get down there right away.

[Beacon Hill]

(The Doctor, the Brigadier and Jo arrive in Bessie.)
YATES: The Director's expecting you, sir.
DOCTOR: Is that where the sabotage took place?
YATES: No, sir. It seems to have happened in the control cabin in the top of that tower.
DOCTOR: Well, that's where you'll find me then. No, Miss Grant. You stay here with the Brigadier.

[Beacon Hill Main Control]

YATES: Director? Miss Josephine Grant and Brigadier Lethbridge Stewart of UNIT.
JO: Good morning.

[Beacon Hill Telescope Control]

(The Doctor is about to enter when there is a materialisation sound. A man in a pin-stripe suit with bowler hat and furled umbrella appears in mid air.)
TIME LORD: Oh, dear. Don't go away, Doctor. My co-ordinates seem to have slipped a little. Still, not bad after twenty nine thousand light years.
(He glides to the gantry.)
TIME LORD: I do hope you can spare a moment or two, Doctor? 
DOCTOR: Sarcasm always was a weak point with you, wasn't it. May I say that I think you look quite ridiculous in those clothes.
TIME LORD: I am travelling incognito.
DOCTOR: Oh? Why?
TIME LORD: We Time Lords don't care to be conspicuous. Some of us, that is.
DOCTOR: Look, if you've come down merely to be rude
TIME LORD: I came to warn you. An old acquaintance has arrived on this planet.
DOCTOR: Oh? One of our people?
TIME LORD: The Master.
DOCTOR: That jackanapes! All he ever does is cause trouble.
TIME LORD: He'll certainly try to kill you, Doctor. The tribunal thought that you ought to be made aware of your danger.
DOCTOR: How very kind of them.
TIME LORD: You are incorrigibly meddlesome, Doctor, but we've always felt that your hearts are in the right places. But be careful. The Master has learnt a great deal since you last met him.
DOCTOR: I refuse to be worried by a renegade like the Master. He's a, he's an unimaginative plodder.
TIME LORD: His degree in cosmic science was of a higher class than yours.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, er, yes, well, I, I was a late developer.
TIME LORD: Would you call that little surprise unimaginative?
DOCTOR: What?
TIME LORD: Look through the door, but be careful.
(We can see a string running across the cabin through the window. The Doctor carefully opens the door a crack to see that it runs from the top of the door to a cylinder balanced on the console.)
DOCTOR: A volatiser. If that thing should fall
TIME LORD: It'll explode and probably destroy this research centre completely. You see, he's rigged it up so that it opening the door will make it fall. Such an amusing idea.
DOCTOR: Well, you'd better think of a witty way of dealing with it.
(The dematerialisation sound.)
DOCTOR: Now wait!
TIME LORD: Oh, good luck!
(The Time Lord vanishes. The Doctor reopens the door a little and feels for the end of the string, then he steps back, bursts in and catches the volatiser just before it hits the floor.)

[Beacon Hill Telescope Control]

(The Doctor unscrews the top of the cylinder.)
YATES: Any luck?
DOCTOR: Keep back.
YATES: What's that?
DOCTOR: A bomb.
YATES: A bomb! Is it defused?
DOCTOR: It is now.
YATES: Where on earth did you find it? Oh, I'm so sorry. Er, this is the Director.
DIRECTOR: How do you do? I hope you realise the police have already investigated this matter.
DOCTOR: Where's Lethbridge Stewart?
YATES: He and Miss Grant are questioning the staff.
DOCTOR: Huh. A fat lot of use that'll do.
DIRECTOR: After all, it's hardly an international matter, is it?
DOCTOR: I understand you've lost a couple of scientists.
DIRECTOR: Yes. Professor Philips and his assistant, Goodge.
(The Doctor picks up the half eaten hard-boiled egg from the table.)
DIRECTOR: Goodge must have left in quite a hurry.
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, he must.
(The Doctor opens the sandwich box.)
DOCTOR: Oh, no!
YATES: What's wrong?
DOCTOR: Look for yourself.
DIRECTOR: It's Goodge!
(Goodge's tiny figure is slumped against the side of the box.)

[Factory office]

(The Master is in a more conventional business suit.)
MASTER: I'm very glad that you could see me at such short notice, Mister Farrel.
FARREL: Well, your telephone call was pretty intriguing, Colonel. Er, do sit down.
MASTER: Oh, thank you.
FARREL: Er, we, er, do have a little spare capacity at the moment.
MASTER: I would say more than a little, considering that your plant has been working at less than half volume for over a year.
FARREL: I see you've done your homework, Colonel. Well, I, er, admit I was interested when you mentioned a steady repeat demand.
MASTER: The people I represent, Mister Farrel, can never have too much plastic.

[UNIT Laboratory]

JO: What is a Nestene?
DOCTOR: Ask Captain Yates. He had the job of clearing up the mess last time.
JO: Well, what is a Nestene?
YATES: Oh, a Nestene? Er, it's a bit difficult to describe, exactly.
DOCTOR: A Nestene is a ruthlessly aggressive intelligent alien life form.
JO: Well, what do they look like?
DOCTOR: Well I expect myself their basic form is analogous to a cephalopod.
JO: What's a cephalopod?
DOCTOR: An octopus. I thought you took an A-Level in science.
JO: I didn't say I passed. Urgh, an octopus.
DOCTOR: They manifest themselves as a disembodied, mutually telepathic intelligence.
JO: But if they're disembodied, how can they hurt us?
YATES: They make themselves bodies when they need them.
JO: You mean like Frankenstein?
(The Doctor puts on a heat reflective apron and gloves.)
DOCTOR: No. They have a natural affinity for plastic. Now, if you've quite finished asking questions?
JO: Sorry. Just forget I'm here.
YATES: At least we should be ready for them this time.
DOCTOR: Too late, Captain. They're here already.
JO: What?
DOCTOR: The radio telescope is their bridgehead. They used that to contain energy into that surviving Nestene unit.
(The Brigadier enters.)
DOCTOR: Brigadier. Look, that unit must be discovered within the next hour.
BRIGADIER: Yes, I'm well aware of the urgency of the situation, Doctor. If we had some idea where its been taken.
DOCTOR: Well, try the plastics factories, man.
BRIGADIER: Yes. I'll set up a search straight away. Yates.
YATES: Right, sir.
JO: Can I help, sir? Please?
BRIGADIER: Very well, Miss Grant.
JO: I'll start by making out some lists.

[Factory office]

(Farrel is getting the full benefit of the Master's Look.)
MASTER: You will obey me and no one else. Do you understand?
FARREL: I shall obey. I shall obey. I shall obey.

[UNIT Laboratory]

BRIGADIER: And you're convinced this man is working with the Nestenes?
DOCTOR: Oh, I should think by now he'll be calling himself their Commander in Chief. Vanity's his weakness. Ah, there you are. It should be cooked by now.
(The Doctor opens a kiln and takes out the cylinder.)
BRIGADIER: This, er, this device of his. Is it very powerful?
DOCTOR: Oh, I should say roughly equal to a fifteen megaton bomb.
BRIGADIER: Really? Well, the research boys'll be glad to get their hands on this.
DOCTOR: Too late, Brigadier. I've boiled out the contents. The weapons that you have on Earth are quite nasty enough as it is.

[Plastics Factory]

(The Master attaches the energy unit to a piece of machinery and walks off. Farrel follows as they go outside. Meanwhile Jo is running across the top of a brick regaining wall at the bottom of a grass bank.)
MASTER: Now the computer.
FARREL: This way.
(Jo hides behind a convenient pile of milk crates as the two men walk towards her, talking.)
MASTER: I see. Excellent.
FARREL: What are you going to do?
MASTER: I wish to alter the masterplan.
FARREL: But that would change our whole production lines!
MASTER: Naturally.
FARREL: My father would never dream of allowing
MASTER: My dear Mister Farrel, don't worry about him. You are under a new thumb now.
(They walk past Jo's hiding place. She gets up to see where they are going and knocks off some small boxes.)
JO: Oh, hello.
(The Master stares at her.)

[Factory office]

MASTER: Who went to the Radio Telescope Station?
JO: Myself, the Brigadier and The Doctor.
MASTER: As I thought. Curiosity is his weakness. Well, I should have to see that it's satisfied. You will return to UNIT with a negative report. You found nothing suspicious. Everything was in order.
JO: Yes. Everything in order.
MASTER: When you leave this room you will have no memory of meeting me, only Mister Farrel.
JO: Only Mister Farrel.
MASTER: Your instructions are already implanted. You will obey them without a further word from me.
JO: I shall obey.
MASTER: Good.

[UNIT Laboratory]

YATES: Yes, what is it, Sergeant?
BENTON: Excuse me, sir. We've just had a call from the civil police. They found Philip's car abandoned.
YATES: Where?
BENTON: In a field about nine miles away from the research station, and they say there's a zinc box in the boot with UNIT markings.
YATES: The energy unit?
BENTON: I've told them not to touch it, Doctor.
YATES: What do you think, Doctor?
DOCTOR: I still am.
YATES: Huh?
DOCTOR: Thinking.

[Factory office]

McDERMOTT: (Irish) I think you'd better go home. Sure, look, I know all our customers and there isn't a Colonel Masters amongst them.
FARREL: You're quite wrong, James. He's taking over our entire production at the moment.
McDERMOTT: Entire? Here, look, I'll tell you what, Rex. Now look, you go through those orders, yes? And you show me this chap. Go on.
FARREL: All right.
(Farrel opens a drawer full of large card files. His head hurts.)
FARREL: I don't understand. There should be a card for him!
McDERMOTT: Look Rex, I think you ought to take a couple of days off. I'll ring your father and he can come
FARREL: May I remind you, Mister McDermott, that my father is retired. I'm running this place now.
McDERMOTT: Your father built this place up from nothing. Sure, I remember when I was a wee lad, he
FARREL: All right, all right, all right! Let's not go over all that again.
McDERMOTT: Look, I'm sorry, Rex, but I especially promised your father I would
FARREL: There's no need to bring father into it! Look, I'll go and fetch him. He's only down in the lab.
McDERMOTT: Who?
FARREL: Colonel Masters, of course. He'll explain everything.
(Farrel leaves. McDermott picks up the telephone.)
McDERMOTT: Sylvia? Get me Mister Farrel senior, please.

[Research Laboratory]

(The Master snaps his fingers and the first of three Autons sits up. Farrel enters, stares and turns to leave. An Auton is behind the door with it's arm raised to strike.)
MASTER: No! Don't be frightened, Farrel. The Autons are my servants. Why do you come here?

[UNIT Laboratory]

(Benton puts the ammo box on the bench. It has a lot of chain fastened around it.)
YATES: That's not an issue padlock, is it?
BENTON: No. I'll try and find some keys.
JO: I can open it.
(Jo takes out a large bunch of skeleton keys.)
YATES: A key for every occasion, eh?
YATES: Doctor, we've got the box down here.
DOCTOR [OC]: Good. I'll be right down.
(Jo unfastens the padlock and starts to prise the lid open. The Doctor has come down the spiral staircase in the corner of the lab.)
DOCTOR: Stop her! That's a bomb!
(Smoke is pouring from the box. Jo thumps Yates hard in the stomach.)
JO: I've got to open it! I've got to!

Episode Two

[UNIT Laboratory]

(Benson drags Jo away. The Doctor grabs the box and throws it through the closed window into the canal. BOOM! Seagulls start squawking.)
BENTON: Strewth! There's going be some complaints about that you know, Doctor.
DOCTOR: My dear Sergeant, if that box hadn't been tied, you wouldn't be here to receive any complaints.
BENTON: Yes sir. I mean, no, sir.
YATES: What gave you the idea it was a booby trap, Doctor?
DOCTOR: She did.
(Jo is standing staring at nothing.)
YATES: What's wrong with her?
DOCTOR: Almost certainly post-hypnotic alienation.
YATES: She's been hypnotised?
DOCTOR: Well, of course. Why else do you think she tried to blow us all to pieces? Come on, my dear, come and sit down over here. Get a chair, Captain Yates. Come on, you sit down here. There. Good.
YATES: Well, I understood that under hypnosis it was impossible for
DOCTOR: You thought that under hypnosis it was impossible for a subject to be persuaded to do anything that was against his nature?
YATES: That's right.
DOCTOR: Well, it's a fallacy, Captain. The Master can completely control the human mind.
BENTON: So he can just take over anyone he likes?
DOCTOR: No, not quite. No, some minds are stubborn enough to resist hypnosis. In any case, it doesn't last. Away from the Master's influence, the mind struggles constantly to free itself.
YATES: Is she in some sort of a trance?
DOCTOR: I think the current jargon is schizoid dissociation. It's because she was forced to do something against her will and her conscious mind refuses to accept the fact. The result is a deep trauma.
YATES: Jo? Where's the Master?
DOCTOR: She won't remember that.
YATES: But she might. Jo! Where is the Master?

[Factory office]

McDERMOTT: Mister Farrel tells me you've changed the mix. What right have you got to interfere? Do you know you've ruined a whole day's production?
MASTER: You call this ruined?
(It's a big black shiny lump.)
McDERMOTT: Well, it's the wrong colour and the wrong texture. Of course it's ruined!
MASTER: You don't appreciate its full potential, do you.
McDERMOTT: Look and I don't want to. It doesn't meet our specification.
MASTER: This plastic has got unique properties, Mister McDermott. Allow me to demonstrate.
(The Master throws the black plastic onto the floor and snaps his fingers. It slowly unfolds itself into an inflated armchair.)
McDERMOTT: It's unique, right enough. So, er, you're a magician as well as a Colonel, eh?
MASTER: I am many things.
McDERMOTT: Aye, well, that's as maybe, but you're not a director of this company, Colonel Masters. I am in charge of production here and I answer only to Mister Farrel and his father.
MASTER: Look, why don't you try it?
McDERMOTT: Well, you'll never sell that, I'll tell you that for nothing. Sure, it looks like like a black pudding.
MASTER: Try sitting in it.
McDERMOTT: It's got a cold clammy feel to it. Now plastic should be warm and dry with a
MASTER: Sit down!
(McDermott gets a Look and obeys.)
McDERMOTT: It's moving.
(The chair starts to wrap around McDermott. Farrel steps forward.)
MASTER: No, I will not tolerate his insolence.
(Finally the back of the chair covers McDermott's face and suffocates him. Farrel goes to the intercom.)
FARREL: Sylvia, will you check Mister McDermott's entitlement on termination of employment, please?
MASTER: It's a very clumsy operation, this. You can see now why this product's got to be changed.
FARREL: Oh, I don't know. Seems very effective to me.
MASTER: What? Yards of plastic to accomplish that which can be done by just a few inches?
FARREL: A few inches?
MASTER: Yes, Farrel. The human body has a basic weakness. One that I which I shall exploit to assist in the destruction of humanity.

[UNIT Laboratory]

DOCTOR: Jo, wake up. Wake up, Jo. This is the Doctor. You're amongst friends.
YATES: It's no good. I think we're just wasting
DOCTOR: Please! Be quiet!
JO: Doctor?
DOCTOR: Yes?
JO: Doctor? Doctor! You
DOCTOR: All right, all right.
JO: Doctor!
DOCTOR: Calm down, Jo. Calm down. We're quite safe.
JO: There was an explosion!
DOCTOR: That was a long way away. Believe me, that was a long way away. Now we're all quite safe. Look around you. See for yourself. Look around. Look. Look, we're all here.
JO: The box! I had to open it! There was a voice.
DOCTOR: Yes well, that voice. Where were you when you heard that voice?
JO: A room
DOCTOR: Mmm hmm.
JO: I don't know where.
DOCTOR: Yes. What sort of a room?
JO: There was a desk.
DOCTOR: Yes.
JO: A telephone.
DOCTOR: An office? Was it a factory office?
JO: Yes! Yes, an office.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, where was that factory? Do you know the name of the factory?
JO: No.
DOCTOR: Well, try and remember.
JO: I can't remember. I can't remember!

[Factory office]

Farrel Senior, Farrel's father, is given the bad news.)
FARREL SR: Dead? He can't be.
FARREL: I'm afraid so, father.
MASTER: Yes he sat down in this chair here, and just slipped away.
FARREL SR: I can't take it in.
FARREL: Yes, it's very sad.
FARREL SR: Well, what did the doctor say?
FARREL: I. I'm not sure. It all happened so suddenly. You see
FARREL SR: Oh, well, anyway, I suppose it's hardly decent in the circumstances but I've driven a long way to talk to you, Rex.
FARREL: Er, yes, father? What about?
FARREL SR: About the way you seem determined to throw away the years of work I've put into this factory. Now just what is going on here?
FARREL: We're changing our policy, father. Introducing new methods, new products.
FARREL SR: You're doing nothing of the sort. You'll carry on on the lines I laid down, or I'll come out of retirement and do the job myself. I'm not past it, you know.
MASTER: Allow me to explain, Mister Farrel.
FARREL SR: I'd be very much obliged if you would.
MASTER: The changes that I have suggested are for the good of the factory. Now you must trust me, there's nothing to worry about.
(The Master stares at the older Farrel.)
MASTER: Nothing to worry about.
FARREL SR: Trust you. Nothing to worry about. There's a great deal to worry about, sir! And frankly, the thing that worries me most is your presence here.
MASTER: Why you
(Farrel stops the Master from hitting his father.)
FARREL: No!
MASTER: Congratulations, Mister Farrel. Usually I can overcome opposition but your will is exceptionally strong. One might say dangerously strong.
(The Master leaves.)
FARREL SR: Damned impertinence. Rex. Rex, hadn't you better go home? I'll see after things here.
FARREL: No. Please, I can manage.
FARREL SR: All right. I'll give you till tomorrow. And by then I want this Masters fellow out of here and production back to normal.
(Farrel Senior leaves and junior's head hurts.)

[Outside the office building]

(The Master goes over to Farrel Senior's car and moves the heating control over to hot, then walks away. When Farrel Senior comes out, he goes over to him.)
MASTER: Oh, Mister Farrel?
FARREL SR: I've nothing to say to you, sir.
MASTER: Well, I thought if you actually saw one of our new lines.
(The Master produces a dwarf-like brown doll with protruding eyes, pointed teeth, three white buttons on its long torso and very short legs.)
FARREL SR: Disgusting object. No demand for a thing like that.
MASTER: I think you're wrong, Mister Farrel.
FARREL SR: Well, since you won't be making any more of them, we shan't have a chance to find out.
(Farrel Senior gets into his car.)
MASTER: Why don't you keep this for a while? Think it over.
FARREL SR: I don't want the thing!
MASTER: Ah, but I insist!
(The Master throws the doll onto the back seat.)
FARREL SR: You're wasting your time.
MASTER: Not at all. I'm simply trying out a new product.
(Farrel drives off.)

[UNIT Laboratory]

(Jo enters cautiously.)
DOCTOR: Hello, Jo. Are you feeling better?
JO: Yes, I'm fine, thank you.
DOCTOR: That's good.
JO: I just wanted to say how sorry I am.
DOCTOR: What on earth for?
JO: The bomb! I might have killed you all.
DOCTOR: Oh, that was nothing to do with you, my dear. That was the Master.
(The Brigadier enters.)
BRIGADIER: You're supposed to be on sick leave, Miss Grant.
JO: I'm okay now again, sir.
BRIGADIER: Oh, so you've recovered your memory then?
JO: No, I'm afraid I haven't. I've tried and tried to remember.
DOCTOR: Yes, well don't. It'll only make things worse. Leave your mind alone. Something may pop up of its own accord.
BRIGADIER: Yes, well, we can't just sit about waiting for something to pop up from Miss Grant's mind. If my agents don't turn up something soon, I'm going to surround and search every factory on that list.
DOCTOR: You know, Brigadier, your methods have all the refined subtlety of a bull in a china shop.
(Yates enters.)
BRIGADIER: Any news?
YATES: Well, it's a bit tenuous. sir.
BRIGADIER: Well, out with it. 
YATES: You know the field where we found Professor Philips' car?
BRIGADIER: Yes.
YATES: Well, Sergeant Benton noticed that the turf was all churned up. So he did a bit of checking and he found that a circus had just left.
DOCTOR: Oh? Where's the circus now?
YATES: Tarminster.
BRIGADIER: I'll get some of my men down there with photographs of Philips. Someone at the circus may have seen him.
DOCTOR: I haven't been to a circus for years. I think I'll go myself.
BRIGADIER: All right, Doctor. I'll get you an escort.
DOCTOR: No, thank you, Brigadier. No, I'll go on my own, if you don't mind. Don't want a lot of soldiers crashing about, do we?
JO: Can I come?
DOCTOR: Er, no, Miss Grant, I don't think so. Not just yet.
JO: But I'm fine now.
BRIGADIER: Miss Grant.
DOCTOR: I'll need some photographs of that man Philips.
BRIGADIER: Oh, they're in my office, but I still don't see why you don't want members of my company to come with you. (The Doctor and Brigadier leave.)
YATES: What's up now?
JO: Oh, nothing. Life's just wonderful.
YATES: Easy, love.
JO: I've really got off to a terrific start, haven't I? I find the man everybody's looking for, I forget where he is and I end up by trying to blow you all sky high!
YATES: No-one's blaming you.
JO: Oh no! You all just tell me to keep out of the way. I'm not a child, you know.
YATES: Well, you're acting like one.
JO: Sorry. But if only I could show them.
YATES: Don't try. Just do as the Brigadier says.
JO: Yes, of course, you're quite right.
(Meanwhile, Farrel Senior is starting to feel the effects of the extra heat in his car and mops his brow. On the back seat, the doll sits up, while Farrel adjusts the car's ventilation controls and opens his front quarter-light. The doll falls back again.)

[Factory office]

(The Master is at the desk doing paperwork when Farrel enters.)
FARREL: I've sent the staff home as you ordered, Colonel.
MASTER: Excellent. Begin maximum output of our new product.
FARREL: Without workers?
MASTER: The Nestene Autons will run the factory.
FARREL: Oh! Er, I'm still afraid my father will make trouble. He, er, doesn't understand.
MASTER: Don't worry about your father. I've persuaded him to change his mind.
FARREL: Why did you send Philips to the circus? The UNIT people may find him.
MASTER: But I sent him there to be found by UNIT. Or better still, by the Doctor.
FARREL: I'm sorry, I don't understand.
MASTER: You see, the bomb was by way of being a greetings card, a small little gallantry on the eve of battle. The car will lure the Doctor to the circus, and there, I shall destroy him.

[Circus]

(In the big top, five Indian elephants finish their dance routine. The Doctor parks Bessie in amongst the caravans and goes over to the tent as the gentle giants leave, followed by a baby. Jo pokes her head up from the back seat. The Doctor shows a photograph to the elephant handler.)
DOCTOR: Philips. Professor Philips.
HANDLER: Sorry, pal, never seen him.
(A large African strong man in leopard skin costume watches the Doctor talking to the clowns. Jo sees him walk away.)

[Farrel Senior's home]

(Mrs Farrel enters, in coat and hat.)
MRS FARREL: Oh, poor Mister McDermott. It must have been a terrible shock for Rex.
FARREL SR: On the contrary. When I walked in, he was just carrying on with his work as if nothing had happened.
MRS FARREL: Oh John, no!
FARREL SR: And this Colonel Masters was just as unconcerned. Frankly, they both seemed to me quite inhuman.
MRS FARREL: You will make Rex get rid of that man.
FARREL SR: I most certainly shall. Frankly, I didn't take to the chap really, or to his repulsive toy. Now, just look at that!
(He shows her the dwarf.)
MRS FARREL: Oh, it's a horrible looking thing. There's something evil about it.

[Circus]

(The Doctor spots the lovely modern horsebox and goes over to investigate. Meanwhile the strong man and Rossini come out of Rossini's caravan. (The Doctor has just put a listening device against the horsebox door, heard something interesting and is about to open the door when a hand pulls him away.)
ROSSINI: Into me wagon, quick!
(Jo has seen this.)

[Rossini's caravan]

(The strong man ties the Doctor to a chair.)
DOCTOR: This is outrageous. Let me go at once!
ROSSINI: You've got some hopes. All right, Tony, he's no elephant. What's your name?
DOCTOR: Smith.
ROSSINI: Smith? You've got no imagination. Try again, Mister Smith.
DOCTOR: Doctor actually.
ROSSINI: Horse doctor maybe?
DOCTOR: You're an insulting ruffian, aren't you?
(Rossini blows cigar smoke into the Doctor's face. He coughs.)
ROSSINI: Why were you so interested in my friend's horsebox?
DOCTOR: What's your friend's name?
ROSSINI: His name's none of your business.
DOCTOR: A strange name. How long's the horse box been here?
ROSSINI: Shut up! I'm asking the questions! Tony.
(Tony grabs the Doctor's elbows.)
ROSSINI: He'll snap your arm like a twig, Mister. Tony don't talk much but he's strong.
DOCTOR: All right, my dear chap, there's no need to do that. I'm perfectly prepared to answer all your questions. And, er, what was the question?
ROSSINI: My friend's horsebox. Why were you so interested?
DOCTOR: I was listening.
ROSSINI: What for?
DOCTOR: Certain vibrations.
ROSSINI: Hmm. I don't think my friend's going to like you.
DOCTOR: I'm sure of it. Where is he?
ROSSINI: Away.
DOCTOR: How much are they paying you?
ROSSINI: Come, come, Doctor. Gentlemen don't discuss money.
DOCTOR: Nonsense, gentlemen never talk about anything else. Now, listen to me. If you're prepared to forget that you've ever seen me and let me go, I will reward you very handsomely.
ROSSINI: Is that so? Let's have a look, Tony.
(Tony takes the Doctor's wallet from his inside pocket. It is empty.)
ROSSINI: Oh, pity.
DOCTOR: I can get money quite easily.
ROSSINI: Eccentric millionaire, eh? Hello.
(Rossini takes out a photograph of Philips.)
DOCTOR: Do you recognise that man?
ROSSINI: Maybe.
DOCTOR: That is a photo of a missing government scientist. If you've had anything to do with concealing him, you are in very serious trouble.
ROSSINI: Someone's in trouble all right, Doctor, but it isn't me.

[Telephone box]

JO: They're holding him prisoner in one of the caravans. 

[Brigadier's office]

BRIGADIER: Just what do you think you're doing down there, Miss Grant?

[Telephone box]

JO: Sorry, sir, no time to argue. I'll go and see if I can help the Doctor.

[Brigadier's office]

BRIGADIER: You'll do nothing of the sort. You'll stay in the background till I arrive. Is that clear?

[Circus]

(Jo watches a man go over to the horsebox, unlock it and enter. She checks the photograph in her pocket.)
JO: It's Professor Philips.

[Farrel Senior's home]

FARREL SR: It must have been a heart attack I suppose.
MRS FARREL: Try not to worry about it, dear. What's this thing doing over here?
(The doll is on the floor by the main radiator, where the fireplace should be.)
FARREL SR: It's the boy's attitude I can't understand.
MRS FARREL: It certainly doesn't sound like my Rex. Oh well, I'll go make the coffee.
(She puts the doll on a shelf and leaves.)
FARREL SR: It's beyond me.
(The doll rolls onto it's stomach and gets to its feet. It jumps down and Farrel Senior spots it running towards him. Mrs Farrel hears a noise in the kitchen as the vicious dwarf sinks its pointed teeth into Farrel Senior's throat, killing him.)
MRS FARREL [OC]: John, are you all right?
(The dwarf runs for cover and Mrs Farrel enters.)
MRS FARREL: John? (she screams)

[Rossini's caravan]

(As the Brigadier and three other UNIT members drive along in an average family car.)
ROSSINI: You don't give very good answers, my friend.
DOCTOR: Maybe you're not asking the right questions.
ROSSINI: No Tony, don't break his arms. Yet. I think I'll tell my friend you've arrived. He'll know what to do with you.
(In a mirror, the Doctor sees Jo looking through the window. He shakes his head and she ducks down out of sight.)
ROSSINI: You know, Doctor, the cost of meat is exorbitant. Maybe my friend'll let me feed you to the tigers.
DOCTOR: You've got a very distorted sense of humour, haven't you?
ROSSINI: All right, Tony, watch him.
(Rossini puts on his bowler hat and leaves. Tony goes to the drinks cabinet and takes a swig straight from a bottle.)
DOCTOR: The strong silent man, eh?
(Jo opens the door and looks in.)
DOCTOR: You've got no right to keep me here, you know? I've got a good mind to call for help. Help! Help! Help!
(Tony grabs a cloth and goes over to the Doctor to push it in his mouth. Jo enters and smashes a convenient vase over Tony's head, knocking him out.)
JO: Doctor!
DOCTOR: What the blazes are you doing here? I told you to stay at headquarters.
JO: It's just as well for you I didn't, isn't it?
(Jo unties the Doctor.)
JO: Doctor, I've seen Professor Philips.
DOCTOR: Oh, where?
JO: He went into a horsebox, over there.

[Factory office]

(The Master is having a video conference with Philips.)
MASTER: This girl you say who's been following you. describe her?
PHILIPS [on monitor]: Small, blond, short hair.
MASTER: Sounds like the Doctor's little friend. I wonder. Switch on the scanners, Philips.
(The monitor shows the area around the horsebox, including Jo and the Doctor standing in the doorway of a caravan.)
MASTER: Very well, Philips. You know what you have to do.
PHILIPS [on monitor]: Yes, Master.

[Rossini's caravan]

JO: What on earth is he doing inside a horsebox?
DOCTOR: It isn't exactly a horsebox. It just happens to look like one.
JO: You mean there isn't a horse inside.
DOCTOR: No more than there's a policeman inside my police box.
JO: So what do we do now?
DOCTOR: Well
(Philips enters, brandishing a silver rod in his hand.)
DOCTOR: Wait! Philips, wait! Don't move, Jo.
JO: What's he holding?
DOCTOR: Some sort of a grenade. Now, Philips, you listen to me. You are about to commit murder.
PHILIPS: I must. He said I must!
DOCTOR: Wait. You just listen. The Master is controlling your mind. You must resist him. You can resist him. You are Professor George Philips of the Radio Telescope research centre. You must resist him!
(Philips leaves, whimpering.)
DOCTOR: You must resist him! Down, Jo!
(Bang outside.)

[Circus]

(Philips is lying on the ground, dead, with a key in his hand which the Doctor takes.)
JO: What happened?
DOCTOR: He tried to get rid of it. Poor chap.
(The Doctor goes to the horsebox.)
JO: What are you doing?
DOCTOR: Shan't be a moment.
(The Doctor enters the horsebox.)
ROSSINI: Come on! Spread out! They can't have gone far!
(Rossini is marshalling his men.)
JO: Hurry, Doctor.
(The Doctor comes out with the same component he was working on from his own Tardis.)
DOCTOR: Well, that didn't take long, did it?
JO: Long enough, I'm afraid.
(The Doctor confronts the mob.)
DOCTOR: Now, wait a minute, listen to me. Now listen to me, all of you!
ROSSINI: Tried to rob my caravan and killed one of my men with a bomb! Get 'em!
(Rossini hits the Doctor with a baseball bat. Jo screams. Just then a police car comes up and skids to a halt and the two officers rescue Jo. Then UNIT arrives in an ordinary car as the police drive off.)
BRIGADIER: Here, wait!
YATES: They're in the back, sir. The Doctor and Jo.
BRIGADIER: Better go and bail them out.

[Police car]

JO: Are you all right, Doctor? Doctor!
(The Doctor becomes alert and checks that he still has the Tardis component.)
DOCTOR: Thank heavens. Nothing damaged.
JO: You speak for yourself. I'm bruised all over.
DOCTOR: It's a good thing you chaps turned up when you did, otherwise we might have been lynched. Lethbridge Stewart must have sent them. Yes, it's nice to know he can use his head once in a while.

[UNIT Comms room]

BENTON: Yes, sir. I've checked with County Headquarters. You were right.
BRIGADIER [OC]: Then it's not a police car at all.
BENTON: No, sir. Definitely not.

[Police car]

JO: Doctor? Where are they taking us?
DOCTOR: It isn't Tarminster.
JO: It's some sort of a quarry.
DOCTOR: Excuse me officer, could I see your warrant card?
(The policeman in front of him turns around. The Doctor reaches towards him and pulls away a mask to reveal a blank plastic face underneath.)

Episode Three

[Quarry]

(There's a brief struggle and the car goes out of control, crashing into a large rock. The unmasked Auton's door is jammed as Jo and the Doctor flee the car and get behind a rocky outcrop before it can fire it's hand weapon. They hide as the two Autons now come searching for them, weapons ready. Then the Brigadier arrives.)
BRIGADIER: Spread out. they can't be far!
(Yates, the Brigadier and an armed soldier start searching the quarry.)
BRIGADIER: Doctor? Miss Grant?
DOCTOR: Get down, man! Get down!
(The still-masked Auton shoots at the Brigadier, and the blast knocks him down. The second Auton comes up behind the soldier.)
YATES: Look out!
(Too late. The soldier dies. Yates and the Brigadier take pot shots at his assailant.)
DOCTOR: They're Autons! Bullets can't stop them!
(Yates gets back into the car and drives it at the unmasked Auton, sending it flying over a cliff and tumbling to the bottom, where it promptly starts climbing back up again.)
DOCTOR: Right, now!
(The Doctor and Jo come out of hiding and run with the Brigadier to the open area where Yates picks them up. The 'policeman' takes one last shot at them as they drive away.)

[Factory office]

FARREL: Colonel? Colonel, the Autons that were sent to recover the bodies of the Doctor and the girl
MASTER: Have returned without them. I know.
FARREL: And you're not angry?
MASTER: Because the Doctor's escaped again? No. He's an interesting adversary. I admire him in many ways.
FARREL: But you still intend to destroy him?
MASTER: Of course and the more he struggles to postpone the moment, the greater the ultimate satisfaction.

[UNIT Laboratory]

BRIGADIER: Six, the Nestenes have landed a small bridgehead force. Seven, they're operating from somewhere from within this area. Eight, they're being led by an intelligent alien known as the Master. Nine, all their operations have, so far, been primarily directed at us here at UNIT.
(Paying no attention, the Doctor goes to the Tardis with the device he stole from the Master.)
BRIGADIER: Ten, what are you doing, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Oh, I'm terribly sorry. Did you want me?
BRIGADIER: I should like your attention, Doctor, until we've settled on a course of action. That is, of course, unless you have something of greater importance to attend to?
DOCTOR: No, no, of course not. No, do carry on, it's most interesting.
BRIGADIER: Thank you. Where was I?
YATES: Ten, sir.
BRIGADIER: Ten. The enemy intention
DOCTOR: The enemy intention is to occupy your planet. I should have thought that was quite obvious.
BRIGADIER: To do that they will have to land additional forces. In other words, this is no more than a diversionary thrust. Do you agree, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Well, I should have thought that was pretty obvious too, isn't it?
BRIGADIER: We have, as you know, raided the circus and arrested Rossini and his thugs. And what have we learned from them?
DOCTOR: Nothing. Rossini is just a tool. The Master used him and then discarded him.
BRIGADIER: There was no sign of alien activity at the circus. This mysterious horsebox had vanished. So had the Autons.
DOCTOR: Naturally. Oh, you have finished with me now, I hope?
BRIGADIER: Not quite.
DOCTOR: Oh.
BRIGADIER: I therefore propose that we redouble our security here and concentrate on finding the Master's headquarters.
DOCTOR: Oh, well, having reached that brilliant conclusion, how about getting on with it? Captain Yates, is my car back yet?
YATES: Safe and sound, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Oh good, that's something anyway.
(The Doctor enters the Tardis.)
BRIGADIER: Any further comments, Doctor?
DOCTOR [OC]: I'll let you know as soon as I think of any.
BRIGADIER: Captain Yates, we will continue this conference in my office.
(The Brigadier and Yates leave. The Doctor comes out of the Tardis.)
DOCTOR: Do you know, Jo, I sometimes think that military intelligence is a contradiction in terms.
JO: You're not very grateful, are you?
DOCTOR: What? For having my time wasted?
JO: He did save our lives, you know. Well? Didn't he?
DOCTOR: You're quite right, Jo. I'll apologise, if I have the time.
JO: What are those things?
DOCTOR: Well, that is the discarded circuit from my Tardis and this is an identical circuit that I, er, borrowed from the Master's horsebox.
JO: What does it do?
DOCTOR: You wait there and I'll show you.
(The Doctor goes to the Tardis.)
DOCTOR: Bye bye, Jo.
JO: Doctor, where are you going?
DOCTOR [OC]: Just a proving flight.
(The dematerialisation sequence starts.)
JO: Doctor! What's happening?
(The dematerialisation sequence stops with a thud. The door opens and smoke comes out, followed by the Doctor.)
DOCTOR: Of all the stupid useless.
(The Doctor kicks the Tardis, hurting his toe.)
JO: Doctor. Doctor, stop being childish.
DOCTOR: What's wrong with being childish? I like being childish.
JO: What were you trying to do anyway?
DOCTOR: Well, my Tardis uses a mark one dematerialisation circuit and I tried to replace it with a mark two.
(The Doctor laughs.)
JO: What's the joke?
DOCTOR: Well, I've just thought of something. My Tardis might not work, but neither will his now. Wherever he is, he's trapped on Earth.

[Factory office]

(Farrel holds up a daffodil for close inspection.)
MASTER: Farrel, be careful. Careful. I don't want an accident.
FARREL: I was admiring the workmanship.
MASTER: Do you think people will be impressed?
FARREL: They're the finest plastic flowers I've ever seen.
MASTER: Yes, well, that's our object. To show the world the skill of the modern plastics industry.
(In a shopping area, men with large carnival heads with yellow boaters, wearing jackets to match, are giving away the daffodils. Once finished, they return to Farrel at a coach.)

[Coach]

(Under the oversized smiles are blank Autons.)
AUTON: We're ready, Farrel. We must drive to the next distribution centre.
FARREL: No! The Master must be obeyed! Must be obeyed.
AUTON: We will wait a little longer. If he's not then returned, we shall drive on.
MASTER [OC]: You will obey me, Farrel. I am your Master.

[UNIT Laboratory]

DOCTOR: (reads) From field section one. Continuous watch maintained. Nothing to report. Business appears to be proceeding normally. No unusual activity. Everything checked and found in order. Report completely negative. Nothing to report so far. Will continue to search. It's worthless! Absolutely worthless!
(The Doctor tears up the reports.)
JO: Now, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Days of exhaustive investigation by the Brigadier's band of bloodhounds and what have they discovered? Nothing, absolutely nothing. The incompetent imbeciles.
JO: We're doing everything possible, Doctor.
DOCTOR: No news from any of those plastic factories?
JO: Well, there were those reports of a promotional tour.
DOCTOR: My dear girl, the Master is scarcely likely to advertise what he's doing.
JO: I suppose not.
DOCTOR: I will not give up. He's lying low somewhere and we've got to find him.
JO: Maybe he's given up.
DOCTOR: The Master? Never! He's too conceited.
(The Brigadier enters with a man carrying a briefcase.)
BRIGADIER: Doctor, this is Mister Brownrose from the Ministry. He's come to us with a rather alarming story.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, I'm not in the mood for stories.
BROWNROSE: Is this man a member of your staff?
BRIGADIER: The Doctor acts as our scientific consultant, yes. His assistant, Miss Grant.
BROWNROSE: How do you do. I hope he's qualified to deal with a matter of this complexity.
DOCTOR: I think you'll find, sir, that I'm qualified to deal with practically everything, if I choose.
BROWNROSE: I must say, Brigadier, I'm far from satisfied that you've grasped the urgency of this matter.
BRIGADIER: I assure you I have.
BROWNROSE: It's not something to be shuffled off onto some stray boffin, you know.
DOCTOR: Now just a moment, my good man. We at UNIT are very busy with a number of extremely urgent matters.
BRIGADIER: Doctor, please.
DOCTOR: The Brigadier has a great deal on his plate. You cannot expect his exclusive attention for your petty concerns.
BROWNROSE: Oh, can't I sir? Now, I'll have you know that my
DOCTOR: Who's in charge of you pen pushers these days? Old Tubby Rowlands isn't it?
BROWNROSE: Lord Rowlands is head of our department, yes.
DOCTOR: I was saying to him in the Club only the other day, wrong sort of chap is creeping into your lot, Tubby, I said.
BROWNROSE: Well, of course, I didn't mean to imply anything offensive.
DOCTOR: No. No, of course not. Say no more about it. Right now, Brigadier, what's your problem?
BRIGADIER: Pretty serious, Doctor. A wave of sudden deaths all over the Home Counties.
DOCTOR: Cause?
BROWNROSE: Asphyxiation, heart failure, shock.
BRIGADIER: In other words, no satisfactory explanation at all.
BROWNROSE: I'm afraid not.
JO: Some kind of virus?
BROWNROSE: There's no evidence of infection.
DOCTOR: Any connection between the victims?
BROWNROSE: None whatsoever. Different ages, sexes and occupations. Apart from the first two deaths, there's no connection at all.
DOCTOR: What about the first two?
BROWNROSE: Well, the first was a man called McDermott, the second, Farrel.
JO: Farrel?
BROWNROSE: Production Manager and retired owner of the same plastics factory.

[Farrel Senior's home]

DOCTOR: Mrs Farrel, I do realise how distressing this must be for you.
MRS FARREL: I've already been over it with the police.
DOCTOR: Yes, I know. Believe me, it is terribly important, you know. You could help us save hundreds of lives.
JO: Would you like us to come back another time?
MRS FARREL: No dear, I'll be all right. Well, I'd gone to make the coffee after lunch, but I heard a noise. I came in and found him.
JO: Your husband seemed quite normal when you left him? I mean not ill or anything?
MRS FARREL: Well, he was a little worried and depressed, I think, but he certainly wasn't ill.
JO: Did he say why he was depressed?
MRS FARREL: Oh, the death of Mister McDermott upset him, of course, and I do know he was very disturbed about developments within the firm.
DOCTOR: What sort of developments?
MRS FARREL: Well, he seemed to think that Rex, our son, he seemed to think that he'd fallen too much under the influence of a new customer. My husband didn't like him at all.
DOCTOR: What was his name?
MRS FARREL: Colonel Masters.
DOCTOR: I knew it.

[UNIT Laboratory]

(Yates enters to find a man working on the Doctor's telephone.)
YATES: Doctor, did you. Who are you?
ENGINEER: Telephone engineer, sir. Just finishing.
YATES: Got your pass?
ENGINEER: Blimey, not again. I've been checked more times than
YATES: Pass. Thank you. Okay, fine. Why such a long flex?
ENGINEER: Specially ordered, sir. Perhaps the gent likes to walk up and down while he's talking.
YATES: Sounds very like him.
ENGINEER: That's it then.

[Farrel Senior's home]

DOCTOR: Is there anything else you can tell us about this Colonel Masters?
MRS FARREL: Well, er, I believe he's still working with Rex. I've been too upset to think about the business.
DOCTOR: Yes, of course, but can you remember anything that your husband said about him? Anything at all?
MRS FARREL: I don't think so. Oh, John did bring one of the new dolls home to examine.
DOCTOR: What sort of dolls?
MRS FARREL: Well, wasn't my idea of a doll at all.
DOCTOR: Could we see it, Mrs Farrel?
MRS FARREL: Yes of course.
DOCTOR: Thank you.
(Mrs Farrel takes the dwarf from a sideboard and gives it to Jo.)
JO: Yes, I see what you mean.
MRS FARREL: It wasn't intended for children, naturally. Some sort of a novelty for grown ups, I suppose. It's odd, you know.
DOCTOR: What is?
Mrs FARREL: Well, when I went out of the room, that thing was on the radiator by the door.
DOCTOR: Yes?
MRS FARREL: But after they'd taken John away, I found it under the curtains. It was as if it was trying to get out.

[UNIT Laboratory]

DOCTOR: Right. Now, lets take a look at this thing.
YATES: Charming little chap, isn't he. Where did you get it?
DOCTOR: Scalpel.
(The Doctor lays the dwarf face down on the bench, stabs it in the back of the neck and cuts down the middle of the back.)
DOCTOR: Forceps.
JO: What are you doing?
DOCTOR: I'm just poking about. Oh, it appears to be made of solid plastic.
BRIGADIER: Why would they make a thing like that solid?
DOCTOR: Why indeed? Let's try the head. Oh. That appears to be solid plastic, too. It's no good, I'll have to make a full analysis.
YATES: Where'd you pick it up?
JO: From the house of a man called Farrel.
YATES: Why bring it here?
JO: Well, the Doctor seems to think it might have killed him.
DOCTOR: Jo, get in touch with scientific supplies, will you? Tell them I need these things straight away.
(Jo takes the piece of paper and goes to the telephone.)
BRIGADIER: Doctor, how on earth could a thing like that kill anybody?
DOCTOR: That, Brigadier, is what I'm trying to find out.
JO: Hello, scientific supplies section?
BRIGADIER: Do you have the result of the post mortem?
JO: I have a requisition for you, top priority.
DOCTOR: Yes, asphyxiation, cause unknown.
YATES: It might have frightened him to death.
JO: Scanning molecular structure analyser.
YATES: But asphyxiation? Well, it's not alive.
JO: Electrode unit.
DOCTOR: The Nestenes change the molecular structure of plastic, Captain Yates. They energise it in some way and turn it into quasi-organic matter, almost like flesh and blood. Well, it's inert at the moment. Something must have activated it.
JO: That's it. Thank you. The equipment's on its way, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Good. How long will it be?
JO: Quite a while, I'm afraid. They've had to send out for most of it.
DOCTOR: What? Do you mean that they haven't got a scanning molecular structure analyser in stock? Oh really, Brigadier. You should keep this place better supplied, you know. I cannot work without proper equipment.
BRIGADIER: I'm very sorry, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, just as well. It'll give me more time to look at Mister Farrel's plastic factory.
BRIGADIER: Now just a moment, Doctor. I'm aware for your preference for acting as a one-man band, but this does happen to be a UNIT operation.
DOCTOR: Lethbridge Stewart, I can assure you
YATES: He's right you know, Doctor. I'd better come with you.
BRIGADIER: No! I shall accompany the Doctor myself. I'm not entirely deskbound yet, you know and I
YATES: Sir
BRIGADIER: That will do, Captain Yates! May I remind you that you're duty officer today. If you're ready, Doctor?
(The Brigadier leaves.)
DOCTOR: Jo, nobody is to touch that thing until I've had the chance of examining it properly, all right?
JO: Don't worry, I won't go anywhere near it. Yuk!

[Coach]

AUTON: We will leave now.
FARREL: No, not until the Master returns.
AUTON: We shall leave without him. We must keep to schedule.
FARREL: For the last time, no!
(The telephone engineer opens the coach door.)
FARREL: Who are you?
(The engineer removes a mask to reveal - the Master.)

[UNIT Laboratory]

(Yates has put a piece of metal on a tripod over a bunsen burner.)
YATES: Until you've had a mug of army cocoa, you just haven't lived.
JO: You know, I don't think the Doctor would approve of that.
YATES: What?
JO: Making free with his Bunsen burner. Hello? Scientific supplies section? I'd like to speak to Mister Campbell please.
YATES: Then he shouldn't go gallivanting off leaving me stuck here.
JO: What about me? I'm stuck here too, you know.
YATES: Oh well, that's different, isn't it? I'll just go and fetch the gubbins.
(Yates leaves.)
JO: Thank you and good night, Captain Yates. Hello? Mister Campbell? Oh, I see. No, no, I'll hang on. Will he be long?
(The bunsen is burning next to the dwarf.)

[Plastics factory]

BRIGADIER: Is anybody there?

[UNIT Laboratory]

JO: Yes, well, the Doctor does need it rather urgently so I thought
(The dwarf rolls over and gets onto its feet.)
JO: Yes, that's quite true, but if anybody could, you could. You're dead right, we'd be in terrible trouble. Could you? Could you really? You're a dolly Scotsman, Mister Campbell. Yes, of course.

[Plastics factory]

(The Doctor and Brigadier go up to the main entrance.)
DOCTOR: It's open.

[UNIT Laboratory]

(Jo turns just as the dwarf leaps at her, and it misses, falling to the floor.)
JO: Mike! Mike, come quickly!
(Yates enters with two mugs and a jar of cocoa in one hand, fumbling for his service revolver with the other.)
YATES: Jo! What's the matter?
(Yates shoots the dwarf, each shot blasting the solid plastic and breaking off limbs.)

[Factory office]

BRIGADIER: Seems as though they've moved camp.
DOCTOR: Yes. Today.
BRIGADIER: Oh, how do you know that?
DOCTOR: Desk calendar. Hello?
(He picks a daffodil up from the floor.)
BRIGADIER: What have you got there?
DOCTOR: A daffodil. A plastic daffodil. Hang onto it for me, will you?
BRIGADIER: What do you want it for? They give these things away with soap.
DOCTOR: It's plastic, Brigadier, and any plastic artefact, anything at all, can, in the Nestene sense of the word, be alive. First a doll, then a flower.
BRIGADIER: What are you getting at, Doctor?
DOCTOR: I wish I knew.
(The Doctor goes over to a large safe set in the wall and sets about the combination lock.)
DOCTOR: Oh, have a look at that desk, old chap, will you?
BRIGADIER: Yes.
DOCTOR: You never know, there might be something there to give us a lead.
BRIGADIER: Oh, nothing much here. Unless this might be something.
DOCTOR: Mmm?
BRIGADIER: Farrel's ordered a coach this week. A fifteen-seater.
DOCTOR: Well, maybe he's going on a works outing.
BRIGADIER: Yeah.
(The Brigadier shuts the office door and starts looking through files in a cabinet next to it. The Doctor opens the safe, which contains an Auton with its weapon hand primed.)
DOCTOR: Look out! Auton!
(The Auton shoots, just missing the Brigadier as he ducks. The Doctor slams the safe door shut and turns the dial.)
DOCTOR: Remarkably persistent, aren't they.

[UNIT Laboratory]

BRIGADIER: This thing actually attacked you?
JO: It was going to if Mike hadn't shot it. It was horrible.
BRIGADIER: Seems as though you may be right, Doctor.
DOCTOR: I usually am.
BRIGADIER: Well, it's dead enough now.
DOCTOR: Jo, where were you when this thing started moving?
JO: I was on the telephone.
DOCTOR: And what about you, Captain Yates?
YATES: I wasn't here. I'd just gone out to, er, fetch some cocoa.
DOCTOR: Yes, well something must have. Fetch a tin of what?
YATES: Cocoa.
DOCTOR: Are you trying to tell me that you were going to make cocoa in my lab?
YATES: That was the general idea. I'm sorry, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, Sergeant. (pause) Now wait a minute. You didn't by any chance use my bunsen burner, did you?
YATES: Well, yes.
DOCTOR: Well that's it then. Heat! This thing was lying alongside my bunsen. It must be triggered off by a pre-determined temperature.
BRIGADIER: Yes, that may account for Farrel's death, Doctor. What about all the others?
DOCTOR: If this thing is what I think it is, we may have the answer right here. Right, off you go, the whole lot of you.
(The Brigadier and Yates leave.)
JO: Me, too?
DOCTOR: Yes, you too. No. No, you go down to the stores and see if you can chase up that Mister Campbell, all right?
JO: Okay.
(Jo leaves. The Doctor hangs his cape on the stand from the Tardis and the telephone rings.)
DOCTOR: Hello, yes? What is it?

[Telephone box]

MASTER: Hello, Doctor. Is that you?

[UNIT Laboratory]

DOCTOR: Who is this? What do you want?

[Telephone box]

MASTER: Simply to say goodbye, Doctor.
(The Master sends an electronic sound down the telephone line.)

[UNIT Laboratory]

(The special extra-long telephone flex wraps itself around the Doctor.)

Episode Four

[UNIT Corridor]

DOCTOR [OC]: Help, Brigadier! Help!

[UNIT Laboratory]

DOCTOR: The cable. Pull it out! Pull it out!
(The Brigadier pulls the phone wire from the socket. The Master hears the line being disconnected and turns off his device. The Brigadier unwraps the Doctor.)
BRIGADIER: You all right, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Yes, more or less.
BRIGADIER: I'm afraid I cut your connection.
DOCTOR: Oh, very amusing.
BRIGADIER: What happened?
DOCTOR: Well, remember what I told you, Brigadier? The Nestenes can put life into anything made of plastic. Anything at all.
BRIGADIER: I see. And there's a lot of plastic around.
(The coach drives past a motor bike waiting in the bushes. The rider starts it up and follows. The Doctor is testing his head theory on the daffodil.)
YATES: Doctor? Doctor?
(Nothing happens so the Doctor puts the bunsen burner down.)
DOCTOR: Well, I was wrong. It isn't heat. Well?
YATES: Message from the Brigadier.
DOCTOR: What is it this time?
YATES: It's about these daffodils.
DOCTOR: What about them?
YATES: You remember we had a report of a plastics promotion tour?
DOCTOR: Mmm hmm.
YATES: Well, er, they're handing out daffodils.
DOCTOR: Who are?
YATES: Chaps in weird carnival masks, touring round in a coach.
DOCTOR: Did they say how many they'd given out?
YATES: No, they didn't. We've got no idea at all, I'm afraid. We don't even know how long they've been doing it. The thing is, the Brigadier wants to know if the daffs are dangerous.
DOCTOR: That, Captain Yates, is what I'm trying to find out.

[Brigadier's office]

(The Brigadier is on the phone.)
BRIGADIER: Excellent. Where was it? Well, give me the grid reference. Yeah. No, just maintain contact. I want to tackle them in open country. Good. Keep me informed.
(He makes a second call.)
BRIGADIER: Lethbridge Stewart here, I want a call to the RAF please. Priority red one. Strike command.

[UNIT Laboratory]

DOCTOR: Excuse me, Jo.
(The Doctor puts a slide with a piece of daffodil onto a small contraption on the bench.)
JO: What are you doing?
DOCTOR: This is a section of that daffodil. I'm trying to find out its molecular structure.
(The results start to come up on a monitor.)
DOCTOR: No.
(A series of hexagons appear.)
DOCTOR: Hello, what's this? A programme pattern.
JO: A programme pattern?
DOCTOR: Yes, these daffodils have their instructions imprinted on every cell. It's a weapon of some sort, but what sort?
JO: Well, will those signs help you find out?
DOCTOR: They will if I can translate them.
(The Brigadier and Yates enter in combat gear.)
DOCTOR: My word, you look very fierce.
BRIGADIER: We've located that coach load of Nestene Autons distributing those daffodils, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Good.
BRIGADIER: They're hiding in that same quarry where they took you.
DOCTOR: Well, that's curious. Was the Master with them?
BRIGADIER: I couldn't say. You might be able to identify him afterwards.
DOCTOR: Afterwards?
BRIGADIER: I've got the RAF to lay on a rocket strike. In a few hours time, that coach should be a pile of scrap iron.
DOCTOR: The military mind at its most scintillating. Faced with a problem they blast it off the face of the earth.
JO: What do you think we should do?
DOCTOR: Nothing. Keep them under observation for a while and give me a chance to find out the purpose of these flowers.
BRIGADIER: I'm sorry, Doctor. I can't afford to take that risk. If that coach moves to a populated area, it'll be impossible to destroy it. The strike will go ahead as planned.
DOCTOR: Captain Yates?
(The Brigadier leaves.)
YATES: Yes, Doctor?
DOCTOR: How long have we got?
YATES: About an hour and a half. The RAF boys are setting things up now and we have established an observation point at the quarry.
JO: Mike, can we reach you there?
YATES: Sure. We'll be in radio contact with HQ and with the RAF. You can get us on one of these.
(Yates gives a radio to Jo.)
YATES: See you, Doc. Bye, Jo.
(Yates leaves.)
DOCTOR: An hour and a half.

[Coach]

FARREL: Everything seems quiet.
AUTON: The humans are watching us.
FARREL: How do you know?
AUTON: We were followed to this place.

[UNIT Laboratory]

JO: But won't that programme pattern be a Nestene?
DOCTOR: Yes, well done. That's why I'm converting it to visual symbols. Ah, here it comes.
JO: That's a face. A part of one.
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, a nose and a mouth.
JO: What does that mean?
DOCTOR: I've no idea.
JO: So what next?
DOCTOR: Well, if it is a weapon, we must find out what triggers it off. Jo, get in touch with the Brigadier, will you? See if he can hold up that air strike. I must have more time.
(Jo uses the radio.)
JO: Hello, Greyhound. This is Trap One. Do you read me? Over. (static) There seems to be something wrong. Hello, Greyhound. This is Trap One. Do you read me? Over.
(The daffodil turns towards them.)
DOCTOR: Jo, look!
JO: It's alive!
DOCTOR: Short wave radio. You must have triggered it off with that walkie-talkie. Of course. They must be planning to set them all off at once with a gigantic radio signal. If I could only find out the direction of the signal.
JO: It seems to be looking for something.
DOCTOR: Jo, be careful. Jo!
(The daffodil sprays out a liquid at Jo's face. It hardens instantly, blocking Jo's nose and mouth. The Doctor has to use an aerosol to get it off her skin.)
DOCTOR: It's all over. You all right?
JO: Just a bit short of breath. What happened?
DOCTOR: Well, your nose and mouth were sealed off with this.
JO: What's that?
DOCTOR: Plastic film. You would have been unconscious in two minutes, dead in under ten.
JO: So all those people were killed by the daffodils?
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, they must have triggered them off accidentally, just as you did. Jo, do something for me, will you?
JO: Yes, of course.
DOCTOR: Get in touch with that idiot Brownrose. See if plastic daffodils were found at the scenes of any of those deaths. Oh, and ask him if anybody was using short wave radios, will you?
JO: Okay.
DOCTOR: You all right?
JO: Fine, Doctor. And thank you.

[Quarry]

(Benton is using the R/T.)
BENTON: Thank you, Eagle. Message confirmed. Over and out. That's it then, sir. Air strike confirmed.
BRIGADIER: Right.
YATES: No word from the Doctor then, sir?
BRIGADIER: No. The air strike's due to begin in thirty seven minutes. If the Doctor's coming up with anything, he'd better be quick.

[UNIT Laboratory]

DOCTOR: Now why wasn't this stuff found on the bodies?
(The Doctor sniffs the plastic film, then breathes hard on it. It shrivels in his hand.)
DOCTOR: Yes, of course. Dissolved by carbon dioxide from the lungs.
MASTER: Good afternoon, Doctor.
(The Master comes down the spiral staircase, holding his cylinder weapon ready.)
MASTER: I hope I'm not interrupting anything important.
DOCTOR: No, no, indeed not. You've come here to kill me, of course.
MASTER: But not without considerable regret.
DOCTOR: How very comforting.
MASTER: You see, Doctor, you're my intellectual equal. Almost. I have so few worth opponents. When they've gone, I always miss them.
DOCTOR: How did you get in here?
MASTER: Oh, don't be trivial, Doctor. I see you've been working on the Nestene autojet. My own small contribution to their invasion plan.
DOCTOR: Vicious, complicated and inefficient. Typical of your way of thinking.
MASTER: Now, come, come, Doctor. Death is always more frightening when it strikes invisibly.
DOCTOR: Tell me, how do you intend to activate these flowers?
MASTER: Oh, by a radio impulse which the Nestenes will send. I shall open the channel for them. We've distributed four hundred and fifty thousand of these daffodils, so when four hundred and fifty thousand people fall dead, the country will be disrupted.
DOCTOR: And in the confusion the Nestenes will land their invasion force.
MASTER: Exactly. It's a shame that you can't be here to enjoy the chaos and destruction with me. Goodbye, Doctor.
(Jo walks in just as the Master was about to shoot the Doctor. As the Master is distracted, the Doctor grabs something from the bench.)
JO: You were quite right
DOCTOR: Wait! Don't shoot.
MASTER: Doctor, you do disappoint me. We Time Lords are expected to face death with dignity.
JO: Oh, no!
DOCTOR: Don't worry. He's not going to kill me.
MASTER: That is your last mistake.
DOCTOR: If you fire that thing, you will never be able to leave this planet.
MASTER: You're bluffing on an empty hand, Doctor.
DOCTOR: I'm not bluffing and my hand, as you can see, is not empty. If you kill me, you will destroy the dematerialisation circuit from your own Tardis. You recognise it, I feel sure.
MASTER: Where did you get that?
DOCTOR: The circus.
MASTER: You underestimate me, Doctor. Let me be quite plain. Either you hand that unit over to me now, or I kill Miss Grant.
DOCTOR: Touché.
JO: Don't! He's beaten already! They're going to bomb the quarry.
DOCTOR: Jo!
MASTER: Oh. There's been a slight change of plan, Doctor. I've decided to let you live, for a little while.

[Quarry]

YATES: Not long now, sir.

[Coach]

FARREL: What's happening out there?
AUTON: The humans are planning to attack us.
FARREL: We should try and leave.
AUTON: We shall leave soon. Our task is not yet completed.
FARREL: He's left us! He's deserted! (pain) How did I get here? I'm not part of this!
(The Auton knocks Farrel out.)

[Quarry]

BRIGADIER: Twenty nine, twenty eight.
YATES: Look, sir.
(The Doctor drives Jo and the Master up to the coach.)
BRIGADIER: Benton, stop that air strike!
BENTON: It's too late, sir.
BRIGADIER: Well try, man, try!
BENTON: Eagle, Eagle, Eagle. Abort, abort, abort!
(In the coach and outside, everyone holds their breath as a Phantom jet roars overhead.)

[Coach]

MASTER: Now, tie these two up.

[Quarry]

BRIGADIER: Not a sign of life down there.
YATES: What do we do if they try to move out?
BRIGADIER: I don't know.

[Coach]

MASTER: Farrel?
AUTON: Farrel became undependable.
MASTER: Did he? His father would have been proud of him.
JO: Ow!
(Jo and the Doctor are lying on the floor of the coach, trussed up.)
MASTER: Yes, Miss Grant, they are a little heavy handed. I apologise for your last moments on earth being so uncomfortable, Doctor.
(The Master takes the dematerialisation circuit.)
MASTER: Thank you. Right, you come with me.
(An energy sphere is pulsing in a cardboard box.)
MASTER: Now, because of the change in circumstances, we're going to have to bring our schedule forward. What we're going to do is this. It's absolutely essential that we
DOCTOR: Jo, you know where we are, don't you.
JO: Roughly, why?
DOCTOR: We're just three or four miles from that radio telescope.
JO: So?
DOCTOR: The Master will activate the daffodils from there.
JO: What are you doing?
DOCTOR: We've got to warn UNIT. If I can just reach these brake pedals.
JO: Doctor, if you're going to drive, I want to get off.
DOCTOR: No. I only hope the Brigadier's keeping his eyes open. Got it!

[Quarry]

YATES: Sir! Sir! The brake lights are flashing.
BRIGADIER: Yes, you're right. Somebody's signalling.
YATES: The Doctor!
BRIGADIER: Benton?
BENTON: Yes, sir?
BRIGADIER: Get this down. E S T

[Coach]

JO: Do you think they're getting it?
DOCTOR: If I can just keep trying.

[Quarry]

BRIGADIER: I O N. That's it. Read that back, Benton.
BENTON: Daffodils are lethal. Activated soon. Destroy immediately. Guard radio research station.
BRIGADIER: Benton, send an alert to the civil police. I want radio and TV warnings, loudspeaker vans, house to house, the lot.
BENTON: Right away, sir.
BRIGADIER: Captain Yates, rustle up every available man and put a guard on that radio research station.
BENTON: Hello, Bluebottle Three. This is Greyhound. Do you read me?
BRIGADIER: I'll stay here with the coach.
BENTON: Do you read me? Over.

[Coach]

DOCTOR: Jo, it's a pity escapology wasn't part of your curriculum.
JO: Funny you should say that. Look.
(Jo has got one hand free.)
DOCTOR: Well done!
JO: Careful!
MASTER: I hope that you two have enjoyed your little rest. Right, the time has come for our final move.
(The Autons drag the Doctor away as one starts to drive the coach. Farrel wakes up.)

[Quarry]

BRIGADIER: They're on the move. Come on, Benton.
BENTON: Right, sir.

[Coach]

(Unseen, Jo works on the Doctor's bonds.)
DOCTOR: That's it, I'm free.
(The coach splashes through a ford, followed by the UNIT car.)
DOCTOR: If he slows down, we might be able to jump for it.
JO: Right.

[Beacon Hill]

(UNIT have got there first.)
YATES: Right, take your positions! Quick!

[Coach]

(Farrel suddenly grabs the steering wheel.)
MASTER: Get back, Farrel!
(The coach veers down the little road, and the soldiers scatter as it crashes through the Research Station sign and on across a field. The Doctor jumps out of the emergency exit and Jo follows.)
MASTER: Let go!
(The Master knocks Farrel out and the coach stops.)

[Beacon Hill]

DOCTOR: Are you all right?
JO: It's my ankle.

[Coach]

AUTON: The two humans have escaped.
MASTER: Never mind about them! I must get to the radio telescope. 
AUTON: The Autojets are being destroyed. It's too late.
MASTER: No! Get out there, all of you. Keep those soldiers back!

[Beacon Hill]

(The masked Autons leave the coach and gun down any soldiers they see. The Brigadier drives up.)
DOCTOR: Brigadier, those daffodils
JO: Doctor, look!
(The Master is going up the metal staircase.)
DOCTOR: The radio telescope! We must stop him reaching the control. He'll open the channel for the Nestenes.
(The Master meets a man in a white jacket coming down, and pushes him over the side. They run to where he lands.)
BRIGADIER: Benton, get a stretcher party. And get some more men.
BENTON: Right, sir.
(The Doctor and Brigadier set off up to the Telescope control room, where the Master is realigning the dishes.)

[Outside Telescope control]

DOCTOR: It's locked.
BRIGADIER: Stand back, Doctor.

[Telescope control]

(The Brigadier shoots out the lock.)
MASTER: Too late, Doctor. The Nestenes are here.
(The dishes are aiming at a point just between them, and something is starting to form. It is bright white energy and appears to have multiple appendages.)
MASTER: An amateur landing, of course. Not the way I planned it.
DOCTOR: If only we could shut off the power.
MASTER: Impossible. They've taken control. No one can stop them now. Your precious little planet is finished.
DOCTOR: If we're finished, then you're finished too.
MASTER: Nonsense! I helped them to come here. 
DOCTOR: Do you really think that that thing will distinguish between you and us?

[Beacon Hill]

(The troops are being decimated as usual.)
BENTON: It's no good, sir. We just can't hold them.

[Beacon Hill Telescope Control]

BRIGADIER: Can't you do anything, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Not unless we change the polarity.
MASTER: Whilst the transfer shift is still open?
DOCTOR: It will fling them right out into space.
MASTER: You're right!
BRIGADIER: Well, you'd better try it and quick!
DOCTOR: Get on to the transfer bank. I'll switch the power through. Are you ready?
MASTER: Yes!
DOCTOR: Right, now!
(The two aliens flick switches and turn knobs. There is an explosion from the telescope control panel and Nestene energy fills the cabin as the image outside starts to lose focus and fade away. The Autons lower their weapons, stagger around a bit then fall over.) 
BRIGADIER: Well, Doctor, it worked.
DOCTOR: Yes, but only just. Another minute and we'd have been too late.
BRIGADIER: He's gone!
DOCTOR: After him, quick!

[Beacon Hill]

JO: Look!
(Yates looks up from an Auton to see the Master disappearing behind the coach. He fires.)
YATES: Sir! He's in the coach, sir. We've got him now.
DOCTOR: Don't be too sure.
(The Master comes out of the coach and walks towards them with his hands raised.)
DOCTOR: Don't trust him, Brigadier. It's a trick.
(The Master suddenly pulls out a gun and Yates shoots him.)
YATES: Well, that's the end of him.
(The Doctor reaches down and removes a mask from - Farrel.)
DOCTOR: I told you not to be too sure.
JO: Look out!
(The Master drives the coach straight at them and presumably right over Farrel, then away.)

[UNIT Laboratory]

BRIGADIER: Well, we found the abandoned coach but the Master disappeared completely.
JO: He's probably left Earth by now.
DOCTOR: Oh, no.
JO: What makes you so sure?
DOCTOR: Well his Tardis can't go anywhere. Not without this.
BRIGADIER: And what the dickens is that?
DOCTOR: That's a dematerialisation circuit. It's very complicated.
JO: So the one he took from you
DOCTOR: Belonged to my Tardis, yes. Yes, I've been trying to repair it for months.
JO: And now he's stuck here on Earth.
DOCTOR: Yes, I'm afraid so.
BRIGADIER: Think he'll turn up again, Doctor?
DOCTOR: yes, bound to.
JO: You don't seem very worried about it.
DOCTOR: I'm not. As a matter of fact, Jo, I'm rather looking forward to it.

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