The Daemons

Original Airdate: 2 May, 1971

Episode One

[Village Green]

(It is a dark and stormy night. The quiet village of Aldbourne in Wiltshire pretends to be Devil's End, with an appropriate eerie howling wind and thunderstorm. Lightning briefly  illuminates the church across the green as the public house, the Cloven Hoof, turns out its last customers - a man and his dog - into the storm.)
JIM: Goodnight, Frank.
FRANK [OC]: Goodnight, Jim.
(By the churchyard, the dog gets free of his master and runs through the gravestones, barking. Jim follows, and we hear a strange noise as a look of terror comes over his face.)

[Street]

(Next morning is dry and clear. The local eccentric spinster is walking along with the local doctor.)
HAWTHORNE: He died of fright, Doctor.
REEVES: My dear Miss Hawthorne
HAWTHORNE: I don't care what you say. The man died of fright!
REEVES: My dear Miss Hawthorne, the medical diagnosis was quite clear. He died of a heart attack.
HAWTHORNE: But his face?
REEVES: Slight protrusion of the eyeballs, rictus drawing of the lips back over the teeth. Common enough in heart failure.
HAWTHORNE: The signs are there for all to see! I cast the runes only this morning.
REEVES You'll have to excuse me. I have my rounds to do.
(Doctor Reeves gets into his car.)
HAWTHORNE: If Professor Horner opens up that barrow, he will bring disaster on us all!
(Reeves drives away.)
HAWTHORNE: This is just the beginning!

[Barrow]

(Cameras are being set up at the archeological dig.)
TECHNICIAN: A bit more, David.
FERGUS: Professor Horner?
TECHNICIAN: That's it.
FERGUS: Now where's he got to, for pete's sake?
(Alastair goes to the tunnel entrance to the bowels of the ancient burial mound.)
FERGUS: Harry?
HARRY: Hello, Alastair. What's up?
FERGUS: Where's Professor Horner?
HARRY: Probably in make up, unless he's had second thoughts and scarpered.
FERGUS: What?
HARRY: Well, you know the local chat. Death and disaster if he opens the barrow.
FERGUS: Well, there'll be a disaster if he doesn't get a shift on.
HARRY: Okay, okay, I'll chase him up.

[UNIT HQ Garage]

(The Doctor is working on Bessie's engine.)
JO: But it really is the dawning of the age of Aquarius.
DOCTOR: So?
JO: Well, that means the occult. Well, you know, the supernatural and all that magic bit.
DOCTOR: You know, really, Jo, I'm obviously wasting my time trying to turn you into a scientist.
JO: Well, how do you know there's nothing in it?
DOCTOR: How? Well, I just know, that's all. Everything that happens in life must have a scientific explanation. If you know where to look for it, that is. Excuse me.
JO: Yes, but suppose something was to happen and nobody knew the explanation. Well, nobody in the world, in the universe. Well, that would be magic, wouldn't it?
DOCTOR: You know, Jo, for a reasonably intelligent young lady, you do have the most absurd ideas.
(Bessie starts up and drives off.)
JO: Doctor, look!
(Bessie goes for an independent spin around the yard before driving back into the garage.)
DOCTOR: Bessie, how dare you go gallivanting around like that.
(Parp.)
DOCTOR: Are you sorry?
(Parp, parp, honks Bessie.)
DOCTOR: Very well, I forgive you. Now go back to your parking place before I change my mind.
(Bessie reverses out of the garage.)
YATES: I know there's a good explanation for all this but I just can't think of it for the moment.
DOCTOR: Would you believe magic?
YATES: Magic?
DOCTOR: Hmm.
YATES: No!
DOCTOR: Well, Jo would.
JO: That's not fair.
DOCTOR: Well, you explain it then.
JO: I don't know. I suppose you did it.
DOCTOR: Naturally. Or should I say scientifically. Solenoids and a solar mechanism in Bessie and
(The Doctor takes a hand-sized box out of his overall pocket.)
DOCTOR: A radio control unit here. You see how easy it is to be a magician?
JO: How infuriating can you get. Well, it doesn't prove anything.
DOCTOR: Would you like me to show you some more then?
JO: No thanks, I've had enough of your knavish tricks. Anyway, I want to see that TV programme. Mike, would you give me a lift?
YATES: Sure.
JO: Thanks.
YATES: You coming, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Coming where?
YATES: Well, to see that programme.
DOCTOR: Oh, not you too, Captain Yates?
YATES: Oh, I wouldn't miss it for the world. Very exciting. Forecasts of doom and disaster if anyone disturbs the burial chamber.
DOCTOR: Captain Yates, you astound me.
YATES: Well, you never know. Devil's End has a funny reputation.
DOCTOR: What did you say?
YATES: Devil's End. The village near the dig.
DOCTOR: Devil's End? Devil's End?
YATES: Doctor, are you all right?
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, I'm fine.

[UNIT yard]

YATES: Now where are you going?
DOCTOR: To see that TV programme, of course.
(The Doctor gets into Bessie.)

[Church cavern]

(The broadcast is getting underway, and Time Team it ain't. Alastair Fergus is speaking direct to camera, his voice echoing eerily in the dark undercroft.)
FERGUS: Devil's End. The very name sends a shiver up the spine. The witches of Devil's End, the famous curse, the notorious cavern underneath the church where the third Lord of Aldbourne played at his eighteen century parody of black magic. Devil's End is part of the dark mythology of our childhood days. And now, for the first time, the cameras of the BBC have been allowed inside the cavern itself. In this cavern, pagan man performed his unspeakable rites. In this cavern, the witches of the seventeenth century hid from the fires of Matthew Hopkins, witch-hunter extraordinary. In this cavern. But I could go on all day.
(Fergus goes past a tableau of devil worship to a cross-legged gargoyle, its chin resting on its hands.)
FERGUS: There is something strange about Devil's End. Is Professor Horner being as foolish as his critics would suggest? I must admit, standing here in this unquiet place, I'm beginning to wonder myself.

[Barrow]

HARRY: Quiet please!
(And cues Fergus, standing outside the tunnel entrance.)
FERGUS: While I was recording that earlier this afternoon, the archaeological dig was proceeding apace. Professor Horner and his team have cut their way into the Devil's Hump, as this barrow is called by the locals, as if it were a giant pie. But now the question is can Professor Horner pull out his plum.
HORNER: Get on with it, man.
FERGUS: Or will the Professor be proved disastrously wrong?

[UNIT HQ. room]

(Bunk beds, table, telephone, drinks machine, a television. Benton is watching TV.)
FERGUS [on TV]: For some two hundred years, the controversy has raged. What is the Devil's Hump. Now, we're not the first to try and find out. But from 1793, when Sir Percival Flint's miners ran back to Cornwall leaving him for dead to the famous Cambridge University fiasco of 1939
(Jo, the Doctor and Yates enter.)
JO: Has it started yet?
BENTON: Shush.
DOCTOR: Let's see what he has to say.
FERGUS [on TV]: Has remained an enigma. But tonight, the enigma will be solved.

[Barrow]

FERGUS: Tonight, at midnight, the witching hour, viewers of BBC3 will have the privilege of being present when Professor Gilbert Horner, the noted archeologist
HORNER: Got round to me at last, have you? About time too.
FERGUS: Not yet, Professor, not yet.
HORNER: Hey you, bring that camera over here, would you? Come on!

[Barrow entrance]

(Horner leads Fergus and the cameraman down the tunnel to a large stone blocking their way.)
HORNER: There, that's the spot. Six inches behind there lies the greatest archaeological find this country has known since Sutton Hoo.
FERGUS: Would you like to explain that reference, Professor?
HORNER: No. And at midnight tonight
FERGUS: Sutton Hoo, of course
HORNER: Never mind about Sutton Hoo. This is what your precious viewers are interested in. The Devil's Hump and what's inside it, right?
FERGUS: And what is inside it?
HORNER: Treasure, that's what. The tomb of a great warrior chieftain, bronze age, 800 BC.
FERGUS: You're very precise?
HORNER: No need to take my word for it. See for yourself, midnight.
FERGUS: Ah yes, now then, why midnight and why tonight?
HORNER: Well, it's obvious. April 30th is Beltane, isn't it?
FERGUS: Beltane?
HORNER: You know, you ought to have done your homework before you came on this dig.
FERGUS: For the viewers, Professor.
HORNER: April the 30th, Beltane, greatest occult festival of the year, bar Halloween.

[UNIT HQ room]

FERGUS [on TV]: Well, frankly, I'm not much wiser.
DOCTOR: Beltane. Of course.
HORNER [on TV]: You've heard the tales about this place? The ghosts, the witches, the curse. The famous curse.
FERGUS [on TV]: You don't believe that.
HORNER [on TV] Do you?
FERGUS [on TV]: Well then, why have you?
HORNER [on TV]: My new book comes out tomorrow.
FERGUS [on TV]: Oh. Then it's what one might call a publicity gimmick.
HORNER [on TV]: Top of the class, lad.
FERGUS [on TV]: And you're not concerned about the reaction of your colleagues to
DOCTOR: You know, there's something dreadfully wrong here.
JO: Hey, you really mean that, don't you?
HORNER [on TV]: Oh, they'll react the same way as always. They'll turn green.
YATES: Well, what could be wrong?
FERGUS [on TV]: But surely, if you
DOCTOR: I don't know. Aquarius? The Devil's Hump? Beltane?
HAWTHORNE [on TV]: I know perfectly well you're on the air. That's why I'm here.
DOCTOR: Come on, think, think!
BENTON: Doctor, look. Something's going on.
(The broadcast has moved back outside the barrow to fend off Miss Hawthorne and her umbrella.)
HAWTHORNE [on TV]: Get your hands off me, young man! Let me go!

[Barrow]

FERGUS: Okay, Harry.
HAWTHORNE: I've come here to protest, and protest I shall.
FERGUS: Now this is Miss Hawthorne, a prominent local resident who's very much opposed to Professor Horner's dig. Professor Horner, I believe you two have already met?
HORNER: I'll say. The daft woman's been pestering me for weeks.
HAWTHORNE: I've been trying to make you see reason.
FERGUS: Miss Hawthorne, why are you so opposed to this dig?
HAWTHORNE: Because this man is tampering with forces he does not understand.
HORNER: Oh, come on now.
HAWTHORNE: You'll bring destruction on yourself and upon the whole area if you persist. Death and disaster await you. Believe me, I know.
FERGUS: But that's just it. Why should we believe you and how do you know?
HAWTHORNE: I'm a witch.
HORNER: You see? I told you she was daft.
FERGUS: Miss Hawthorne, you don't really mean to say
HAWTHORNE: I tell you I'm a witch! White, of course, but that is why you should listen to me. I know!
FERGUS: Well, thank you very much, Miss Hawthorne, for a most interesting
HAWTHORNE: I've cast the runes. I've consulted the talisman of Mercury. It's written in the stars. When Beltane is come, tread softly, for lo, the prince himself is nigh. And tonight is Beltane.
HORNER: You see? Mad as a hatter.
FERGUS: The prince?
HAWTHORNE: The Prince of Evil, the Dark One, the Horned Beast.

[UNIT HQ room]

DOCTOR: Come on, Jo.
JO: Where to?
DOCTOR: Devil's End, of course. That woman is perfectly right. We've got to stop that lunatic before it's too late.
(Jo and the Doctor leave. Dramatic music drowns the conversation on the television until)
FERGUS [on TV]: Miss Hawthorne, Professor Horner, thank you. So

[Barrow]

FERGUS: There we are. It seems that time is running out in more ways than one. What is going to happen here at midnight? Why not tune in to BBC3 at 11.45 tonight and find out? Until then, from me, it's goodbye now. Alastair Fergus, The Passing Parade, Devil's End.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

(The television behind the bar is switched off.)
WINSTANLEY: (old man, Squire) Good for Miss Hawthorne! She kept her end up jolly well.
BERT: (mine host) The woman's round the twist if you ask me. Always has been.
GIRTON: You're right, Bert. Should have been put away years ago.
WINSTANLEY: Oh, I'm not so sure she hasn't got a point. Broadly speaking, you know.
GIRTON: What, all that stuff about death and disaster? Well, you're not telling me you believe it, Mister Winstanley?
WINSTANLEY: Well, no, but there have been a lot of queer goings on the last few weeks. Strange sudden noises and gusts of wind, and poor old Jim dropping down in the churchyard.
BERT: Yeah, Frank was telling me his cows have gone dry and my wife's hens have stopped laying.
WINSTANLEY: Yes, and all since they started digging up there on Devil's Hump.
BERT: Could just be a coincidence, you know.
GIRTON: We've had a spell of bad weather. Always upsets things that does.
WINSTANLEY: Yes, but just suppose she's right, eh? How about that, Bert?
BERT: Well, I'll tell you. if the Old'un does come along here tonight, he can have my best room. My bread and butter, he is.

[Street]

(The village constable comes out of number 3 and goes to his bicycle.)
GROOM: Good evening, Miss Hawthorne. Saw you on the television just now. Very good I thought you were.
HAWTHORNE: They chopped me, cut me off. Don't you worry, Constable. I'll get my chance later tonight. You'll see.
(A sudden strong wind blasts down the street, nearly blowing them off their feet.)
HAWTHORNE: Avaunt, all ye elementals!
(Groom picks up a large rock from his garden.)
HAWTHORNE: Avaunt all ye powers of adversity!
(Groom walks up behind Hawthorne with the rock.)
HAWTHORNE: Be still and return to thy resting.
(The wind dies down and Groom lowers the rock.)
HAWTHORNE: Be at peace in thy sleeping. Mister Groom? Mister Groom, are you all right?
GROOM: Yes, I think so. I just felt a bit faint for a moment or two.
HAWTHORNE: I'm not at all surprised. Not at all. It'll pass, Mister Groom, it'll pass.
GROOM: I'm feeling a lot better now already, thank you.
HAWTHORNE: We must be on our guard, all of us.
(Hawthorne walks off, Groom looks down at the rock he is holding. Meanwhile, the Doctor and Jo are driving down a country road in Bessie. The strong wind grabs a four-finger sign post at a junction and spins it around, sending them straight on instead of right to Devils End.)

[Churchyard]

(Miss Hawthorne walks through and along the wall towards the vicarage. The verger suddenly appears in front of her.)
HAWTHORNE: Oh!
GARVIN: What do you want?
HAWTHORNE: How dare you jump out at me like that. Out of my way, please.
GARVIN: What do you want?
HAWTHORNE: Well, if you must know, I wish to contact the vicar.
GARVIN: Mister Magister's not in at the moment.
HAWTHORNE: Not him. I mean the real vicar.
GARVIN: What would you call Mister Magister then?
HAWTHORNE: I mean Canon Smallwood, our old vicar. The one who left in such mysterious circumstances.
GARVIN: Nothing mysterious about it. Taken ill and had to leave.
HAWTHORNE: Suddenly? In the middle of the night? Without so much as a goodbye to anyone in the village?
GARVIN: I've got no time to listen to your nonsense. I've got my work to do.
HAWTHORNE: Very well then. I'll see the other gentleman. I cannot say that I like him but he is at least a man of the cloth.
GARVIN: I told you, didn't I? He's not in.
HAWTHORNE: Well, I intend to find that out for myself. Let me pass please.
GARVIN: You're wasting your time.
HAWTHORNE: If you don't stand out of my way, Garvin, I shall be forced to use violence.
MASTER: Dear me, I hope that violence will not be necessary. Good evening, Miss Hawthorne, and what can I do for you?

[UNIT HQ. room]

(Benton is finishing a telephone call.)
BENTON: Well, that's made a mess of my evening.
(The Brigadier enters in Regimental dress and white gloves.)
BRIGADIER: Everything in order, Yates?
YATES: Yes sir. No problems.
BRIGADIER: All right, Benton. Right, and I'm off. You know where to reach me if anything crops up.
YATES: Yes sir. Have a good evening, sir.
BRIGADIER: Thank you, Captain Yates. Goodnight.
YATES: Goodnight, sir.
BENTON: Goodnight, sir.
(The Brigadier leaves.)
BENTON: It's all right for some, isn't it, sir? And we're stuck here with a television and a plate of corned beef sandwiches!

[Churchyard]

HAWTHORNE: I beg you to help me, Mister Magister. Help me to stop that foolhardy man.
MASTER: You mean the Professor? But surely
HAWTHORNE: He must not enter the tomb, tonight of all nights.
MASTER: Why ever not?
HAWTHORNE: Beltane. The forces of evil are abroad tonight.
MASTER: Really, Miss Hawthorne, as a rational man, I
HAWTHORNE: We are all in mortal peril, Vicar! Have you no concern for the souls in your care?
MASTER: The soul as such is a very dated concept. Viewing the matter existentially, I
HAWTHORNE: Existentially? Oh, you're a blockhead!
MASTER: Miss Hawthorne, one moment. You're very distressed, I can see that. You know, you really are worrying unduly.
(The Master removes his spectacles and gives her a Look.)
MASTER: There's nothing to worry about. You must believe me. You must believe me.
HAWTHORNE: Must believe. Oh, why should I believe you? A rationalist, existentialist priest indeed.
MASTER: Listen to me!
HAWTHORNE: You're a fool, sir. If you won't help me, I must find someone who will.
(Hawthorne brandishes her ankh at the Master and leaves. The Master gestures Garvin to follow her.)

[Road]

(Night has fallen. The Doctor stops Bessie at a junction as Jo tries to read a map by torchlight.)
DOCTOR: It's no good, we're hopelessly lost.
JO: I can't understand it. We followed the sign posts all right.
DOCTOR: Well, if we had, we would have been there by now. You must have missed one.
JO: I did not!
DOCTOR: If you look at the map the right way up, we might eventually get there. Now, which way is it?
JO: Er, that way.
DOCTOR: Thank you very much.

[Barrow]

HARRY: You all right, Alastair?
FERGUS: Of course I'm all right! Why shouldn't I be, for Pete's sake? Of all the stupid questions.
HARRY: Well, I only asked. There's no need to make a production number out of it.
FERGUS: I'm sorry, Harry. I'm just a bit on edge. I'll be all right.
HARRY: Everything okay, Professor? Won't be long now.
HORNER: Any sign of that fool woman?
HARRY: Not so far.
HORNER: Well, keep her away from me. I'll tell you, lad, I'll do her a mischief.
HARRY: Do my best. Now, you've got everything straight? We start with an intro from Alastair, then I give you a cue to launch into your spiel
HORNER: Spiel?
HARRY: The chat bit. Momentous occasion and all that.
HORNER: Oh, aye.
HARRY: Tom says if you could break into the burial chamber as the church clock strikes the first stroke of midnight, that would be absolutely super.
HORNER: Right-o, lad. I'll do my best to be absolutely super. Super.
HARRY: Professor? Suppose something does happen?
HORNER: Like?
HARRY: Personal appearance of you know who?
HORNER: Well, use your initiative, lad. Get your chatty friend over there to interview him.
HARRY: Of course. Why didn't I think of that?

[UNIT HQ room]

(Benton is watching rugby football on the television when Yates enters.)
COMMENTATOR [on TV]: Trying to run out of his own twenty five, then inside to Neary
YATES: Anything happen yet?
BENTON: No sir, not a thing.
COMMENTATOR [on TV]: To Robinson who couldn't hold it.
YATES: Isn't it about time for the dig?
BENTON: Just about. This is highlights from the game at Twickenham.
YATES: Better turn over then.
COMMENTATOR [on TV} There's Robinson
BENTON: Hey, did you see that?
YATES: Quite right too!
(A scrum is awarded.)
COMMENTATOR [on TV]: A number of the Staffordshire county side who are
BENTON: As bad as the ref, you are, sir. Oh no!
YATES: That'll learn them.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

BERT: Come along now, friends, drink up!
(The Doctor and Jo enter.)
BERT: Sorry, sir. Well past time.
DOCTOR: That's quite all right. We don't want a drink, just the directions to the Devil's Hump.
JO: Where the dig is.
BERT: Ah, you're going up there are you? It's all on telly, you know.
DOCTOR: Yes, yes, I know, but would you please tell us the way? This is very urgent.
BERT: Always in such a hurry, you towns folk. All be the same in a hundred years time, sir.
DOCTOR: I can assure you, sir, it will be no such thing.
WINSTANLEY: Are you one of these television chaps then?
DOCTOR: I am no sort of chap, sir.
WINSTANLEY: Forgive me, but I thought. Well, the costume and the wig, you know?
DOCTOR: Wig?
JO: Now, Doctor.
GIRTON: What do you want to go up the Hump for anyway?
DOCTOR: Look, there is no time for all these unnecessary questions
BERT: All the time in the world, sir.
DOCTOR: I want to go up to the Devil's Hump because I want to stop that lunatic Professor of your from bringing devastation upon you all.
GIRTON: Huh. One of Miss Hawthorne's brigade!
(Girton leaves.)
DOCTOR: Is nobody here capable of answering a perfectly simple enquiry? What's the matter with you all?
WINSTANLEY: You're making all the fuss, old man.
DOCTOR: Fuss? I've never heard such balderdash in all
JO: Doctor. Look, could you please tell us the way?
WINSTANLEY: Yes, certainly. Straight past the green outside, fork left, straight up the rise and you can't miss it.
DOCTOR: Excellent. Thank you very much.
JO: Thank you. Goodbye.
WINSTANLEY: Extraordinary fellow!

[Church Vestry]

GIRTON: White hair, he had, and a sort of cloak.
MASTER: Did he by any chance call himself the Doctor?
GIRTON: That's right! It's what the girl called him. How did you know that?
MASTER: It's of no importance. Well, Girton, you've done very well, but why aren't you ready?
GIRTON: Well, I thought I should tell you. He said he was going to stop the dig.
MASTER: You'd better hurry and change. We start the ceremony in a few minutes.
(Girton goes down to the cavern while the Master takes a red robe with gold trim from the vestments cupboard. He puts it on and goes down to join a group of black-robed figures in the cavern, under the watchful gaze of the gargoyle and to the sound of dripping water. He steps up to an altar and acolytes bring gold vessels.)

[Barrow]

HARRY: Quiet, please! Lots of lovely hush. Quiet! Stand by. On the studio announcement now. Good luck, Tom.
FERGUS: Welcome back, viewers. And here at the Devil's Hump, the excitement is intense. The stage it set. What shall we see when the curtain rises?

[Church cavern]

(Bessie drives at speed down the road as the Master begins his ceremony with black candles lit and small cauldron smoking.)
MASTER: As my will, so mote it be.
COVEN: Nemah.
(The Master sprinkles unholy water on the altar then raises his hands in prayer.)
MASTER: Hearken to my voice, oh Dark One. Ancient and awful, supreme in artifice, bearer of power, I conjure thee. Be present here at my command and truly do my will. Aba, abara, agarbara, gad, gadoal, galdina!
COVEN: Eoh evotay!
MASTER: As my will, so mote it be.
(The Master drops some incense into the cauldron, and it flares.)

[Road]

(The way is blocked by a fallen tree. The Doctor and Jo try to move it.)
DOCTOR: It's no good, we're just wasting time. Come on. If we run we'll just make it.

[Barrow entrance]

HORNER: Let's face it, you've had enough blather from t'other fellow! You want to see for yourself. Well, I'll tell you what you're going to see. A stone wall. There you are. What did I tell you? I'm not daft!

[Church cavern]

COVEN: (continuously) Eoh evotay.
MASTER: Og ot erus saw bmal eht tnew yram taht, erehwyreve dna, wons sa etihw saw eceelf sti, bmal elttila dah yram!.
COVEN: Eoh evohay!
MASTER: Eoh, eoh, Azal!
COVEN: Eoh, eoh, Azal!

[Barrow]

(Underground, Horner uses his trowel to clean around the large slab sealing the burial chamber. Above ground, the Doctor and Jo run across the grass. The church clock starts its midnight chime.)
DOCTOR: Stop! Stop that dig! Stop it!

[Church cavern]

MASTER: By the power of earth, by the power of air, by the power of fire eternal and the waters of the deep, I conjure thee and charge thee Azal. Arise, arise at my command, Azal! Azal!
COVEN: Azal!

[Barrow entrance]

DOCTOR: Stop! Don't pull that stone! Don't!
(The stone falls forward, knocking Horner down and a hurricane blasts out, up through the tunnel and demolishes the craft table and lights outside.)

[Church cavern]

(The Master laughs in triumph as his coven stagger around.)
MASTER: Azal!
GIRTON: Look!
(The gargoyle's eyes glow red and its head turns from side to side.)

[Barrow entrance]

JO: Doctor! Are you are you all right?
(Horner and the Doctor are literally out cold and covered in snow. The tunnel roof starts to cave in.)
JO: Doctor! No! Doctor! Oh no!

Episode Two

[UNIT HQ room]

(The rugby match finishes.)
YATES: Thirteen nil.
BENTON: They're lucky it wasn't a hundred and thirteen nil. What a useless lot.
(Benton hands Yates his winnings.)
YATES: We've missed the dig.
BENTON: We might just catch the end of it.
(Benton changes channels.)
YATES: Look, there's Jo.
JO [on TV]: Doctor!
(And up comes a caption reading Devils End temporary fault BBC3tv.)
ANNOUNCER [on TV]: We seem to have lost all contact with the barrow. We shall, of course, resume transmission as soon as we can. In the meantime, here's some music.
YATES: Benton, get on to the BBC and see if you can find out what's going on down there. I'll try to raise the Brigadier.
BENTON: Right, sir.

[Barrow entrance]

(Jo and the TV crew are clearing soil from the Doctor and Horner.)
JO: Look at him. Please, hurry! Please hurry!

[Church cavern]

MASTER: Oh, great Azal. I, the Master, thank thee for arising at my command. Behold my worthy disciples. They know now of thy presence and will seek to help thee to fulfil my desires. Therefore I command them to rise to their feet and welcome thee, Azal! To do my will shall be the whole of the law.
COVEN: To do thy will shall be the whole of the law.
MASTER: Azal, hear me. Let this stone mark the appointed place.
(Near the rear wall is a square raised slab with an occult compass rose painted on it.)
MASTER: Let us meet together later that thou mayest learn my intent. As my will, so mote it be.
COVEN: As thy will, so mote it be.
MASTER: You have nothing to fear so long as you do the will of the Master. Go now, and say no word to any man, but await my commands.

[Barrow]

(The Doctor is still covered in ice crystals.)
HARRY: He's gone too.
JO: No. No, he can't be! Look, we must get a doctor!
HARRY: Look, love, face it. They've had it.
JO: But there must be a doctor in the village or somewhere!
HARRY: Charlie, can I have word with you a minute?
CHARLIE: Okay, Harry.
HARRY: Charlie'll take him down now.
JO: Thank you. Doctor! Doctor, please!

[UNIT HQ room]

(Everyone is making telephone calls.)
BENTON: Now listen, this is an official call from UNIT.
YATES: Yes, but gone on to where?
BENTON: United Nations Intelligence Taskforce.
YATES: Because it's urgent.
BENTON: Look, I warn you, if you're withholding information.
YATES: (Into phone.) You will ring me back?
BENTON: But you must know something?
YATES: Right then, I'll ring you in ten minutes.
BENTON: Well, find out and ring me back at this number.
YATES: No, make it five.
(Benton and Yates put the receivers down.)
YATES: Anything?
BENTON: No, sir. You?
YATES: No. The Brigadier went on somewhere after dinner. No one knows quite where.
ANNOUNCER [on TV]: We're sorry for this interruption in our outside broadcast from Devil's End but we still can't get through to our unit.
YATES: Oh, this is stupid!
ANNOUNCER [on TV]: Just as soon as we have some news for you
YATES: I've a good mind to go down there and find out for myself.
BENTON: The Brigadier'd go spare, sir. I mean, we might get news at any minute.
YATES: Oh, yes, sure, and in the meantime what's happening to Jo and the Doctor?

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

(The Doctor is lying on a table, still stiff as a board.)
REEVES: Too late, I'm afraid. He's gone, just like the Professor.
JO: No. No, he can't be dead!
REEVES: I'm sorry.
JO: Oh, please, you must do something!
REEVES: I can't work miracles, you know. He's very nearly a solid block of ice.
WINSTANLEY: Oh, there, there. I'm sorry, my dear, there's nothing we can do.
REEVES: I don't believe it.
WINSTANLEY: What?
REEVES: Get some blankets and some hot water bottles. Lots of them.
JO: He's alive, then!
REEVES: It's possible but I think I felt a pulse.
JO: Oh, then there's a chance?
REEVES: Maybe. He must have the constitution of an ox to be able to survive a reduction of temperature like that.
WINSTANLEY: He doesn't look all that tough.
REEVES: You can't always tell by. Hello.
JO: What?
REEVES: Silly, really. I swear it sounds as if he's
WINSTANLEY: What?
REEVES: It's quite ridiculous. It must be an echo off an atypical bone structure.
WINSTANLEY: Sounds as if what?
DR. REEVES: As if he had two hearts. One on each side.
BERT: Here, doctor.
(Bert brings blankets.)
REEVES: Fine, fine. Now more if you've got them.
JO: He's going to be all right then?
REEVES: There is a chance.
WINSTANLEY: Cheer up. While there's life there's hope, right?
JO: Look, have you got a telephone I could use, please?
BERT: In the corner.
JO: Oh yes, thank you.

[UNIT HQ room]

YATES: (into phone) But is he all right now?

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

JO: Well, touch and go, I think Mike. Look, can you get down here right away?

[UNIT HQ room]

YATES: Yes, of course. We'll come down in the chopper as soon as it's light.
(Someone cuts the telephone cable on the whitewashed wall.)
YATES: Hello? Jo? Can you hear me? Blast. We've been cut off.

[Barrow]

(The BBC are leaving the site.)
HARRY: Well, that's the last of us. Thanks for all your help.
GROOM: Happy to oblige, sir.
HARRY: I can't wait to get away myself. Don't envy you.
GROOM: Oh, that's all right, sir. Just a bit of night duty. I enjoy a bit of peace and quiet.
HARRY: Well, you're welcome to it, mate. Anyway, I'm away. Goodnight.
GROOM: Bye, sir.
(Groom closes the five bar gate and puts up a hand-made 'Danger Keep Out' sign. Then he takes a pack of sandwiches from his bicycle saddle bag. Behind him, two red lights shine from the barrow entrance.)
(Next morning, the Doctor is nicely tucked up in a bedroom at the pub with Jo watching over him. In his ordinary vicar's clothes, the Master prays before Azal's altar. Out at the barrow, PC Groom is having a drink from his thermos when the ground shakes. He turns and a shadow falls across his face. The Master smiles and leaves the cavern.)

[UNIT helicopter]

(Benton and Yates are in civilian clothes.)
BENTON: Soon be there, sir.
YATES: Hello, what's that?
BENTON: Must be the dig.
YATES: No, beyond that. A line of. They couldn't be hoofmarks, could they? They're enormous.
BENTON: Shall we go and see, sir?
YATES: Better.

[Field]

(The cloven prints have scorched the grass.)
BENTON: They are, you know, sir.
YATES: Hoofmarks? They can't be. The animal that made these would have to be at least thirty feet tall.
BENTON: Well, whatever it is, it's gone into that wood over there.
YATES: Well, it'll have to wait. Come on, first things first.
BENTON: What, like breakfast you mean, sir?
YATES: No, I don't. I mean Jo and the Doc.
BENTON: Right.

[Village Green]

(Jo is dozing by the Doctor's bed when the helicopter wakes her as it lands on the green. She goes down to meet them.)
BENTON: Well, where's the red carpet then? And the brass band?
YATES: After last night, I reckon they all deserve a lie-in.
BENTON: Well, there's the pub, sir.
YATES: And Jo.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

YATES: Are you sure you're all right now?
JO: Yes, thanks, honest. Boy, am I glad to see you two.
YATES: And the Doc?
JO: Upstairs. Better, I think, but he's still out cold.
YATES: Oh, he'll pull through. You know what a tough old bird he is.
BENTON: Anyway, you're both safe. That's the main thing.
JO: Well, I don't think there's any danger in here, but out there.
YATES: Look Jo, what is going on?
JO: I don't know. Something really bad, you know.
YATES: Well, how do you mean?
JO: Well, you know, devilish.
BENTON: Look, sir, if you don't need me here, I'd like to make a quick recce of those tracks.
YATES: Oh.
BENTON: Look, fifteen minutes, say twenty?
YATES: Right. But at the first sign of trouble, straight back here.
BENTON: Right.
JO: Do be careful, Sergeant Benton. 
BENTON: Don't you worry, Miss. Oh, and don't forget to contact the Brigadier, sir.
(Benton leaves.)
YATES: Ah! I'd forgotten all about him.

[Brigadier's bedroom]

(The telephone has woken the Brigadier, who is still in bed.)
BRIGADIER: The Doctor's gone? Gone where? Well, you should know, Corporal. I want to talk to him. What? Oh, all right then, wake up Miss Grant. I see. And I suppose she didn't leave a number either? I suppose it wouldn't do any good to ask for Captain Yates or Sergeant Benton? My helicopter? Where to? Devil's End. Yes, yes, I see. Get my car here right away. Yes, and if they do contact you, tell them to stay put.

[Churchyard]

HAWTHORNE [OC]: Help! Help! Help! Let me out of here!
(Benton hears her and runs to the church.)
HAWTHORNE [OC]: Help! Help!

[Church Vestry]

HAWTHORNE [OC]: Oh, let me out.
(Benton lifts the lid on a large oak chest.)
HAWTHORNE: Who are you? Friend or foe?
BENTON: Friend, I hope, ma'am.
(Benton starts to untie her.)
HAWTHORNE: Oh, very perfect gentle knight.
BENTON: What?
HAWTHORNE: Well, your damsel in distress may be a bit long in the tooth, but she's very grateful.
BENTON: Yes, well, you're lucky I heard you.
HAWTHORNE: Who are you?
BENTON: Benton. Sergeant Benton. What happened?
HAWTHORNE: Police Sergeant?
BENTON: No, army. Now who put you in here?
HAWTHORNE: Garvin the verger. We must we must get the police at once. Oh, oh, may name's Olive Hawthorne, by the way. How do you do?
(Benton helps her out of the chest.)
BENTON: How do you do. Look, what is going on here? All hell seems to be breaking loose.
HAWTHORNE: Do you know, Sergeant, you're exactly right. Come on.
(Hawthorne looks outside.)
HAWTHORNE: Shush.
BENTON: What is it?
(A man is walking towards the church.)
HAWTHORNE: Garvin, the one who tied me up. Quickly. We'll hide down here till he's out of the way.

[Church cavern]

HAWTHORNE: Good heavens!
BENTON: What? What is it?
HAWTHORNE: The gargoyle. It's gone! Shh!
(They hide in an alcove as Garvin comes down the steps, looks around then leaves again.)
HAWTHORNE: Better wait til he's gone.
BENTON: Here, what's this?
HAWTHORNE: The sign of the Evil One. Keep away!
BENTON: For goodness sake!
HAWTHORNE: You know who's at the bottom of all this.
BENTON: No, who?
HAWTHORNE: The Reverend Mister Magister.
BENTON: Who's he?
HAWTHORNE: The vicar, so called. But he's an imposter.
BENTON: Oh, yeah?
HAWTHORNE: Oh, I should have realised at once. Magister is the name given to the leader of a black magic coven.
BENTON: Black magic? That stuff died out years ago.
HAWTHORNE: Do you know when the last Witchcraft Act was repealed in this country? 1951. Why, it's as alive today as it ever was.
BENTON: Yes, well.
HAWTHORNE: I'm sure it's safe now.
GARVIN: That's what you think. (Garvin has returned with a shotgun.) All right, on your way. Move.
(Benton walks up to Garvin with his hands raised. Garvin jabs at him with the shotgun to turn around. Benton does so then kicks the gun upwards and grabs it, pushing Garvin against a pillar with it against his throat. But Garvin is good, and throws Benton. They wrestle, and Benton gets him to drop the weapon, but ends up standing on the decorated stone. Suddenly he starts to convulse. Miss Hawthorne manages to grab an elbow and pull Benton to safety.)
GARVIN: All right, on your feet.
HAWTHORNE: Don't be stupid. Can't you see he's half unconscious?
GARVIN: Somebody'll have to help him then, won't they?
HAWTHORNE: Yes. Come along. Come on.
(Hawthorne drapes Benton's arm over her shoulders to carry him.)
GARVIN: Right, come on. This way.

[The Cloven Hoof guest room]

YATES: Doctor. Doctor, wake up.
JO: You see? He's been like that for hours.
YATES: Well, shouldn't he be in hospital?
JO: Well, Doctor Reeves said that we shouldn't move him.
YATES: Then we'll just have to wait.
(Garvin keeps the shotgun pointed at Hawthorne and Benton as they leave the church and walk straight into a bright red light and strong wind. Garvin cowers as Hawthorne gets Benton away round the corner. Then Garvin empties his weapon into whatever it is before he bursts into flames. The pub is also shaking and the air is red with heat as something goes into the church cavern and the decorated stone. The heat and wind stop.)
YATES: Are you all right?
DOCTOR: Eureka!

[Vicarage]

MASTER: Azal, I welcome thee!
(Outside the village, a delivery van swerves off the road by the turning to Devils End. The driver runs, covering his ears at the unearthly noise, then his van bursts into flames.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

(The Doctor is up and dressed.)
JO: Now you're sure you're all right? Look, you'd better come and sit in this chair over here. Come on.
DOCTOR: Jo. Jo, please, stop fussing.
YATES: She's right, you know. Better take it gently.
DOCTOR: Look, I tell you, I am perfectly all right. It was a bit parky up there for a while, I'll admit, but it soon warmed up.
JO: That wave of heat.
DOCTOR: Yes, the final confirmation of my theory.
JO: You mean you know what caused it?
DOCTOR: Yes, I think so.
YATES: Tell us then.
DOCTOR: No, not just yet. I want to wait until I'm absolutely sure. Right, I'm going back up to the dig.
JO: Doctor, haven't you had enough of that place?
BERT: Hello? You better? I thought you'd had it.
DOCTOR: Fortunately, no. Captain Yates, you'd better wait here, all right? (Hawthorne enters, carrying Benton.)
HAWTHORNE: If I drop him, he'll go with a most dreadful wallop!
YATES: He's out on his feet!
DOCTOR: Get him over to that bench, quickly!
BERT: Here, what's happened to your boy?
YATES: He's been beaten up. By an expert, I'd say.
HAWTHORNE: Oh, you might indeed say that! You might indeed.
YATES: Oh, no.
HAWTHORNE: Oh dear, he's a very heavy young man.
BERT: I'll get a doctor.
DOCTOR: Yes, it's all right. I am a Doctor.
(Benton groans as the Doctor checks him over.)
DOCTOR: Well, there are no bones broken or anything. Look, could you get me some hot water and some hot sweet tea, perhaps?
BERT: Yes, sure.
DOCTOR: Thank you very much. And thank you too, Miss Hawthorne.
HAWTHORNE: You know who I am?
DOCTOR: Yes, of course. It's a great pity they didn't listen to you in the first place.
HAWTHORNE: If only they had. Oh, what a tale I'll have to tell them now!

[Vicarage]

(The Master is on the telephone.)
MASTER: Both alive, are they? And the others? I see. Very well, they'll all be dealt with. Now you'd better get back inside before they become suspicious.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

YATES: It was this fellow, Garvin, who did him over?
HAWTHORNE: No, no, no, it was the elementals in the cavern.
DOCTOR: Elementals?
HAWTHORNE: Yes, creatures of the Devil.
YATES: Did you say the Devil? 
HAWTHORNE: Yes, dear boy. Satan, Lucifer, the Prince of Darkness, Beelzebub, the Horned Beast. Call him what you like, he was there.
DOCTOR: You saw the Devil?
HAWTHORNE: Yes.
DOCTOR: And what did he look like?
HAWTHORNE: Well, it was a glimpse, no more. Twenty, thirty feet high, but the horns were there, and that face.
JO: The Devil?
DOCTOR: Look, Miss Hawthorne, I agreed with you from the first about the danger, but now I think you're utterly mistaken. Whatever else you saw it certainly was not the Devil.
HAWTHORNE: But it was! There's a Satanist cult in this village and last night they held a sabbat.
YATES: A sabbat?
HAWTHORNE: Yes, an occult ceremony to call up the Devil.
JO: And it worked! The Devil came!
DOCTOR: Nonsense, Jo. Miss Hawthorne, who is the leader of this cult?
HAWTHORNE: The new vicar. He calls himself Magister.
DOCTOR: Magister. Yes, of course, I should have known.
JO: What?
DOCTOR: Jo, did you fail Latin as well as science? Magister is the Latin word for Master!

[Road]

(The delivery man flags down an approaching car.)
BRIGADIER: What's up?
MAN: I wouldn't go any further, mate. Look what happened to my van!
(The Brigadier and Sergeant get out of the car.)
BRIGADIER: Petrol fire?
MAN: No, it just went up in a flash.
BRIGADIER: During the earth tremor's, was it?
MAN: No. Just after it stopped. I was about to get back in and drive back to the village and bingo, off it went.
BRIGADIER: Is that Devil's End over there?
(The Brigadier points with his swagger stick promptly bursts into flames. He tries again. The ground beneath the area is black.)
BRIGADIER: Must be some sort of heat barrier. We'll try getting in from the south.
(Meanwhile, the Doctor and Jo are clearing the fallen tree, which they have cut into manageable pieces.)
DOCTOR: Right. Get the saw, will you?
JO: Yes.
(Bessie can now drive on, but coming in from the south, the Brigadier is stopped by another heat haze. He tests it with a dead twig.)
BRIGADIER: Right, that settles it. We'd better try and raise the Doctor.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

(Yates has got a walkie-talkie now.)
YATES: And that's about it, sir. Over.

[Road]

BRIGADIER: I see, Yates. So, the Doctor was frozen stiff at the barrow and was then revived by a freak heat wave. Benton was beaten up by invisible forces and the local white witch claims she's seen the Devil.
YATES [OC]: Yes, sir. I know it sounds a bit wild.
BRIGADIER: It does indeed, Yates. Now listen, I'm bringing up some men to investigate this heat barrier. Let me talk to the Doctor. Over.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

YATES: I'm afraid you can't, sir. He's gone up to the dig with Jo. Over.
BRIGADIER [OC]: I see. Well, Yates, anything further revelations?
YATES: Just one, sir.

[Road]

BRIGADIER: Well, what is it?
YATES [OC]: We've found out who's at the bottom of all this. It's the Master. Over and out.

[Vicarage]

MASTER: Still alive, are you, Doctor? Very well.
(The Master closes his eyes and concentrates, his face twitching. Then he goes and looks out of the window.)

[Barrow]

(The Doctor and Jo arrive at the dig to find Constable Groom lying under the remains of the gate.)
DOCTOR: Poor fellow.
JO: Do you know what killed him?
DOCTOR: Well, it certainly wasn't the Devil. At least, not exactly.
JO: What do you mean?
DOCTOR: Look, I'm going in. Would you prefer to wait outside?
JO: No. I'd rather stick with you, if I wouldn't be in the way.
DOCTOR: No, of course not. I'd be glad of the company. Come on.
(They go down the tunnel into the middle of the mound, and a stone creature with wings looks over the rise. The gargoyle from the church cavern.)

[Barrow chamber]

(The stone sealing the chamber has been blasted away. The Doctor looks around with a torch.)
JO: What are you looking for?
DOCTOR: If my theory's right, we're all in mortal danger.
JO: Everyone in the village?
DOCTOR: Everyone in the whole world. Ah. (He sees something on the floor and brushes the soil away.)
JO: What is it?
DOCTOR: Metal.
JO: It looks like a model spaceship.
DOCTOR: That's right. Except that it isn't a model.
JO: What is it then?
DOCTOR: Jo, look at the shape of this tomb.
JO: Well, it looks like that spaceship.
DOCTOR: A different size, that's all. Now you try picking it up.
JO: I can't. It's fixed down.
DOCTOR: The reason why you can't pick it up is that is weighs about seven hundred and fifty tons, at a rough guess.
JO: Oh, come on, be serious.
DOCTOR: Be serious. All right. About a hundred thousand years ago
(Meanwhile, the gargoyle - whose name is Bok, apparently - enters the barrow and goes down to terrorise the Doctor and Jo in the chamber.)

Episode Three

[Barrow chamber]

DOCTOR: Hold this!
(Jo takes the torch and the Doctor holds a small trowel up towards the gargoyle.)
DOCTOR: Clokleda partha mennin klatch.
(Bok retreats a few paces, and shakes.)

[Vicarage]

MASTER: What's happening, Bok? Why do you not attack? You must! You must! There's nothing to fear. It's just mumbo jumbo! I. Oh, very well, return. Return!

[Barrow chamber]

(Bok obeys that command willingly.)
DOCTOR: Phew.
JO: How did you do that?
DOCTOR: Iron. It's an old magical defence.
JO: But you don't believe in magic.
DOCTOR: I don't, but he did. Luckily.
JO: Was that a spell you said?
DOCTOR: No, it's the first line of an old Venusian lullaby, as a matter of fact. Roughly translated it goes, 'Close your eyes, my darling. Well, three of them, at least'.
JO: Doctor.
DOCTOR: I must admit, that thing took me completely by surprise.
JO: What was it?
DOCTOR: It looked like a gargoyle made of stone.
JO: But it was alive.
DOCTOR: In a sense, yes.
JO: But that wasn't what Miss Hawthorne described, surely?
DOCTOR: No, the creature she saw must have been a hundred times more hideous.
JO: And neither of them were the Devil.
DOCTOR: No, not your mythical devil, Jo, no, but something far more real and far more dangerous.

[Vicarage]

MASTER: Now see here, Winstanley. This is an emergency. It's up to you to call a meeting of the village and start behaving like the Squire.
WINSTANLEY: You may be the vicar, but I'll thank you not to take that tone with me.
MASTER: Ah, a man of spirit are you? That's exactly what's wanted at a time like this.
WINSTANLEY: I still don't understand what you're talking about.
MASTER: Decadence, that's what I'm talking about. It's what I see on every side. All this talk of democracy, freedom, liberty.
(The Master fixes Winstanley with a Look.)
MASTER: What this country needs is strength, power and decision. And those are what you can give to it.
WINSTANLEY: Yes. Yes, you're right, of course.
MASTER: I am the Master. I control a power which can save this world. If you choose, you can share my triumph.
WINSTANLEY: Power? What power?
MASTER: I control the forces that have been released in Devil's End over the last few hours.
WINSTANLEY: All that fuss up on the dig? Are you trying to tell me it was you?
MASTER: Exactly.
WINSTANLEY: Well, that's ridiculous!
MASTER: You need proof, do you? Very well, you shall have it.
(The Master concentrates, and a strong wind blows the front doors open and a flowerpot off a table. A portrait falls from the wall.)
WINSTANLEY: Stop it! Stop it!
(A fern in a pot comes crashing down from the upstairs landing, then the Master relents.)
MASTER: Well?
WINSTANLEY: I'll do anything you say.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

HAWTHORNE: Here you are, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Oh, thank you, Miss Hawthorne. Let me help you.
(The Doctor takes a pile of books from Miss Hawthorne's arms.)
HAWTHORNE: Thank you. The pick of the finest collection of occult material in the country, though why you wanted me to bring it, I don't know.
DOCTOR: You've all been asking me for explanations. Perhaps these will help me to provide them.
HAWTHORNE: Well, there is only one possible explanation. This is the supernatural at work.
DOCTOR: Nonsense.
BENTON: Yes, well, what about the thing that got me? That was real enough.
DOCTOR: There's nothing more real than a forcefield, Sergeant, even a psionic one.
(The Doctor looks at a selection of photographic slides.)
HAWTHORNE: You're being deliberately obtuse. We're dealing with the supernatural, the occult, magic.
DOCTOR: Science.
HAWTHORNE: Magic!
DOCTOR: Science, Miss Hawthorne.
YATES: Look, whatever it is, how do we stop it?
JO: And how can we stop it without knowing what it is?
DOCTOR: Well done, Jo. You're being logical at last. I'll turn you into a scientist yet. Right, if there are no more interruptions, I'll tell you what it is.
(Yate's R/T beeps.)
YATES: Sorry. Greyhound Two. Come in, please. Over.

[UNIT Mobile HQ]

BRIGADIER: Greyhound Two to Trap Two. Is that you, Yates? Now, what's going on there?
YATES [OC]: Quite a bit, but I don't think you'd believe me, even if I told you.
BRIGADIER: The thing is we can't get past this wretched heat barrier. It incinerates anything that tries. Over.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

YATES: Can't you go round it, Brigadier? Over.

[UNIT Mobile HQ]

BRIGADIER: The thought had occurred to me, Captain. I sent out patrols but as far as I can see
(Sergeant Osgood brings a report.)
BRIGADIER: Well, that settles it. The perimeter of this thing is an unbroken circle ten miles

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

BRIGADIER [OC]: In diameter, its centre being the village church. Over.
DOCTOR: Give me that. Hello, Lethbridge Stewart? The Doctor here. What about going over the top of it?

[UNIT Mobile HQ]

BRIGADIER: The RAF are just coming through now. Hang on a minute.
(A Phantom jet flies over.)
PILOT [OC]: Red zero four to Greyhound Two. No go, repeat, no go. Last test canister exploded at altitude four five zero zero feet. Estimate dome shaped area above village approximately one mile high at apogee. Over.
OSGOOD: Thank you, zero four. Received and understood.
PILOT [OC]: Over and out.
BRIGADIER: You hear that, Doctor? We're locked out. Over.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

DOCTOR: Or we're locked in. All right, Brigadier, we'll keep in touch.

[UNIT Mobile HQ]

BRIGADIER: Doctor? Doctor! Yates! Typical.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

(The Doctor has drawn a diagram of the dome with the church at its centre.)
DOCTOR: Right, that's it. Now, as you can see, we're smack in the middle of a sort of lethal mushroom, about ten miles across and a mile high.
YATES: I can understand that part of it all right, but can't you explain the wider issues, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Yes, all right. Jo, Captain Yates, would you mind drawing the curtains?
(The Doctor sits behind a slide projector.)
DOCTOR: Come on, Jo, stir your stumps. Now then. All right? Now then, tell me. Who's that?
(A papyrus image of a ram's head with the solar disc between its horns.)
JO: An Egyptian god, isn't it?
DOCTOR: Top of the class, Jo, top of the class. That's right, that's the Egyptian god Khnum, with horns. There's another one, a Hindu demon.
ALL: With horns.
DOCTOR: Oh. Thank you very much. And our old friend the Horned Beast.
YATES: I don't get it.
DOCTOR: Probably because I haven't finished, Captain Yates.
YATES: Oh sorry, Doctor.
HAWTHORNE: Oh, you could go on all day and all night showing us pretty pictures. I mean, horns have been a symbol of power ever since
DOCTOR: Ever since man began? Exactly. But why? All right, Captain Yates, the curtains. Now creatures like those have been seen over and over again throughout the history of man, and man has turned them into myths, gods or devils, but they're neither. They are, in fact, creatures from another world.
BENTON: Do you mean like the Axons and the Cybermen?
DOCTOR: Precisely, only far, far older and immeasurably more dangerous.
JO: And they came here in spaceships like that tiny one up at the barrow?
DOCTOR: That's right. They're Daemons from the planet Daemos, which is?
JO: Sixty thousand light years away on the other side of the galaxy.
DOCTOR: And they first came to Earth nearly one hundred thousand years ago.

[Vicarage]

(The good folk of the village have been gathered.)
MASTER: Now, you'd better explain to them all why you've called them together, then leave the rest to me.
WINSTANLEY: Yes. Meeting to order, please. Thank you. Thank you, ladies and gentlemen. Well now, it seemed to me that we ought to get together and discuss the situation, before it gets out of hand. Now it seems that the vicar here has had a few thoughts on the subject, so I've asked him to put in a word. Mister Magister.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

JO: A spaceship, fifteen inches long?
DOCTOR: That's right. Mind you, when it landed it was two hundred feet long and thirty feet across. But they diminished it, just as they diminished themselves, which accounts for the heat wave and the freeze-up.
JO: Hmm? Sorry, could you say that again? I didn't quite follow you.
DOCTOR: Oh, come on, Jo. E=MC squared.
JO: You're the Doctor.
DOCTOR: Look, when you lose mass the energy has to go somewhere.
YATES: I see, so all we've got to deal with is something which is either too small to see or thirty feet tall, can incinerate you or freeze you to death, turns stone images into homicidal monsters and looks like the very devil.
DOCTOR: Exactly.
BENTON: Well, I still don't get it. I mean, what's the creature doing here? I mean, why did they ever come?
DOCTOR: To help Homo sapiens kick out Neanderthal man. They've been coming and going ever since. The Greek civilisation, the Renaissance, the industrial revolution. They were all inspired by the Daemons.
HAWTHORNE: But this thing the Professor let loose is evil, you said so yourself and now you're trying to say they've been helping mankind for a hundred thousand years.
JO: Yes, and you say they come from another planet. Well then, what's all this jazz about witchcraft and covens and so on?
DOCTOR: Look, don't you see? All the magical traditions are just remnants of their advanced science, and that is what the Master is using.
HAWTHORNE: Then these creatures are linked with the black arts. They are evil.
DOCTOR: Amoral, perhaps. They help Earth but on their own terms. It's a scientific experiment to them. Just another laboratory rat.
YATES: Then what's the Master up to?
DOCTOR: He's established a link with the Daemon. What worries me is the choice. Domination by the Master or total annihilation.
JO: What, this Daemon could destroy the world?
DOCTOR: What does any scientist do with an experiment that fails? He chucks it in the rubbish bin.
JO: The end of the world.

[Vicarage]

MASTER: Now, as I've told you, this is not going to be a sermon. But all the same, I do beg of you to listen carefully. Because this could be the most important day in your lives. Now as you know, I am a newcomer among you, and yet already I feel that I know you all. For instance, you, Mister Thorpe. Are you still padding the grocery bills of the local gentry?
THORPE: What are you on about? That's slander.
MASTER: Now, now, don't deny it. I know. And you, Charlie. How's your conscience? Do you think you'll manage to balance the Post Office books in time? And you, Mister Grenville. Has your wife come back from her sisters yet? Will she ever come back, do you suppose? Now, now, no, please. Please do not be angry with me. I assure you that I'm on your side. Now, listen. If you do what I say, you can all of you get whatever you want in this world, when you want it. If you listen to me.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

DOCTOR: Now the Daemon will appear three times, and the third time he'll probably tell us what our fate is to be. Now he'll be in the cavern somewhere awaiting the Master's second call.
BENTON: Then if we know where he is, why don't we go and find him?
DOCTOR: You'd be wasting your time, Sergeant. At the moment he's so small he's practically invisible.
JO: But Doctor
DOCTOR: Jo, would you get me a piece of paper and a pencil, please?
(Bert enters.)
BERT: I wondered if you'd all care for a bite to eat?
BENTON: Yes, please.
JO: No, thanks, not just now. The Doctor's a bit busy.
BERT: Ah. Well, is it all right if I get on with a bit of clearing up?
JO: Yes, fine, if you could do it quietly though.
BERT: You won't know I'm here.
JO: Thank you.
(Yate's R/T beeps.)
YATES: Greyhound Two. Come in, please. Over.

[UNIT Mobile HQ]

BRIGADIER: Is that you, Yates? Now look, we're going to blast our way in. I'm calling up the artillery and RAF strike command. You lot had better evacuate to the cellars.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

BRIGADIER [OC]: Over.
DOCTOR: What? Give me that. You'll do no such thing, Lethbridge Stewart. Of all the idiotic suggestions. In the first place, the energy released would only strengthen the barrier, in the second place it would provoke the most appalling reprisals and in the third place I've got a better idea. Over.

[UNIT Mobile HQ]

BRIGADIER: Well, what? Now I'm not going to sit here like a spare (pause) like a spare lemon waiting for the squeezer. Do you hear me? Over.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

DOCTOR: Have you got the mobile HQ there?
BRIGADIER [OC]: Yes, of course.
DOCTOR: With the new mark 4A condenser unit?

[UNIT Mobile HQ]

(Osgood nods.)
BRIGADIER: Apparently.
DOCTOR [OC]: Good. Then I've got your problem solved and mine. We're going to build a diothermic energy exchanger. Is your technical fellow there?
BRIGADIER: He's listening. 

  [The Cloven Hoof bar]  

DOCTOR: Right, well tell him to build an EHF wide band width variable phase oscillator, with a negative feedback circuit tunable to the frequency of an air molecule at, er, what is the temperature up at the barrier, Brigadier?

[UNIT Mobile HQ]

BRIGADIER: We've no idea what you're talking about, Doctor. Over.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

DOCTOR: Well, it's a simple enough question. Over.
BRIGADIER: No, no, what you said earlier. The oscillating feedback bit.
DOCTOR: All right, I'll come out and explain it to you myself. Yates and Benton can stay here and keep an eye open. Only don't touch anything until I get there. Understood?
(Bert leaves.)
BRIGADIER [OC]: All right, Doctor, we'll try it your way, but get a move on, will you?
DOCTOR: I'll be with you in ten minutes.

[UNIT Mobile HQ]

BRIGADIER: Make it five. Over and out.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

JO: Of all the idiotic plans. As if blowing things up solves anything.
DOCTOR: Jo, the Brigadier is doing his best to cope with an almost impossible situation. And since he is your superior officer, you might at least show him a little respect. Coming?

[Vicarage]

MASTER: I ask you what you want in life and I offer it to you. I tell you that everything is possible if you do as I say. everything.
(Bert enters.)
BERT: Magister!
MASTER: Why do you interrupt me?
BERT: The Doctor, he's trying
MASTER: Shush!
(The Master goes over to Bert listens while the villagers mutter loudly. The Master then gives Bert some instructions and he leaves.)
MASTER: Girton.
(Girton gets whispered instructions and leaves.)
MASTER: Now please, as I was telling you, the whole world can be ours. I only need two things. Your submission and your obedience to my will.
WINSTANLEY: What's all this about obedience and submission? You said that we were going to rule.
MASTER: You rule? Ha! Why, you're all less than dust beneath my feet!
WINSTANLEY: Preposterous!
MASTER: You choose to question me, do you? Very well, I'll give you another choice. Obey me or I shall destroy you!
WINSTANLEY: If that's your brave new world, you can keep it! I'm getting out of here and if the rest of you have got any sense, you'll come with me.
THORPE: I reckon the Squire's right. Come on, let's get out of here.
(Up on the stair landing, the Master concentrates, and Bok jumps in through the window. The Master gestures and Bok makes Winstanley disappear.)
MASTER: Right, does anybody else agree with the Squire? Thank you. It does my heart good to know I have such a willing band of followers. Now, today is May Day. Go and enjoy yourselves. Celebrate the festival with your families. When I need you all, I shall summon you again.

[Village Green]

(Yates spots Girton getting into the UNIT helicopter and runs out of the pub. He pulls Girton out, and they struggle, but Girton is too much for Yates and doesn't even flinch when he gets punched on the jaw repeatedly. Finally Girton knocks Yates out, gets into the helicopter and takes off. A few moments later Yates recovers and tries shooting at the helicopter, then spots a motorcycle parked at the edge of the green and commandeers it.)

[Heat barrier]

JO: Look!
(The Doctor stops Bessie as the helicopter flies low over them.)
DOCTOR: What's happening? I told Yates and Benton to stay in the pub.
(The helicopter makes a return pass.)
DOCTOR: Who's flying that thing? That's not Benton!
JO: Well it's certainly not Mike. Look!
(The motorbike is coming up behind them.)
JO: Well, however it is, he's trying to kill us.
DOCTOR: Hang on, Jo. We're in for a bumpy ride.
(Bessie drives off, and Yates pulls up alongside.)
YATES: He's handling it like an expert!
DOCTOR: Like a man possessed, you mean. Look out, he's coming back.
YATES: I'll try and draw him off!
DOCTOR: No, you keep away. It's me he's after, not you.
(Yates peels away. Girton buzzes Bessie again within sight of the Brigadier and his men.)
BRIGADIER: What's Captain Yates up to? He'll kill the lot of them.
OSGOOD: No sir, that's Captain Yates over there.
(Yates is shooting at the helicopter again.)
JO: What's he trying to do?
DOCTOR: He's trying to drive us into the heat barrier.
BRIGADIER: He's heading straight for the heat barrier. Get back! Back!
(Bessie charges on as the helicopter comes in sideways again.)
JO: The heat barrier! We're heading straight for it!
BRIGADIER: Back!
DOCTOR: Hang tight, Jo. Hang on tight. Now!
(With the scorched earth about ten feet away, the Doctor throws Bessie hard to port, and Jo falls out. Girton can't make the turn in time and the Brigadier's helicopter bursts into flames. The Master sees the plume of smoke from the churchyard and is happy. The Doctor and Yates run over to where Jo is lying.)
YATES: How is she?
DOCTOR: She's had a nasty knock on the head. She'll be all right. You'd better load her into Bessie and take her down to the pub. She'll be needing rest and quiet for a bit.
YATES: Okay. What about you?
DOCTOR: Well, I'd better go and have a word with the Brigadier. He's probably bursting a blood vessel by now.
(Yates puts Jo into Bessie, while the Doctor drives to the barrier on the motorcycle. In the church cavern, the Master, in his red robe, orders Bok back to his pedestal and stands before the altar.)
BRIGADIER: Twenty thousand pounds of UNIT money gone up in a puff of smoke.
DOCTOR: You've got the mind of an accountant, Lethbridge Stewart. So, this is your heat barrier, is it?
BRIGADIER: Yes, and I advise you to keep your distance.
DOCTOR: Yes?
(The Doctor throws a small stone into the barrier. It disintegrates in a flash.)
DOCTOR: Hmm. Even rock.
BRIGADIER: Wood, rock, four inch armour plate. You name it, we've tried it. It's impenetrable.
DOCTOR: A hasty and inaccurate assessment, Brigadier. Tell me, have you got enough cable to reach those high tension pylons over there.
BRIGADIER: Yes, we should have. Why?
DOCTOR: We'll need at least ten thousand volts to get through this lot.
BRIGADIER: All right, I'll lay things on.
DOCTOR: Good. Only please hurry, we may have very little time left.
BRIGADIER: Sergeant Osgood?
OSGOOD: Sir?
BRIGADIER: You'd better come and listen to the Doctor. You've got to build the wretched thing.
OSGOOD: What's the principle, sir?
DOCTOR: Negative diathermy, Sergeant. Buffer the molecular movement of the air with the reverse phase short waves. It's quite simple.
OSGOOD: Simple? It's impossible.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, according to classical aerodynamics, it's impossible for a bumblebee to fly!

[Church cavern]

(The Master is getting an invocation ceremony underway.)
MASTER: By the power of earth, by the power of air, by the power of fire eternal and the waters of the deep, I conjure thee and charge thee, Azal. Arise, arise at my command, Azal. Arise, arise.

[The Cloven Hoof guest room]

(Jo is in the bed now.)
JO: The cavern. He said the danger was in the cavern.
REEVES: Just lie still, my dear. Try and relax.
JO: But the
REEVES: This won't hurt.
JO: But the Doctor. I must help him find the Master!
YATES: Take it easy, Jo. As soon as he gets back, we'll all go and sort the Master out. Now don't worry.
(Doctor Reeves sedates Jo.)
JO: But we must go now. There's no time to
REEVES: That's better. A few hours sleep and she'll be as right as rain.

[Church cavern]

MASTER: Heho evoway! Heho evoway Azal! I will speak with you. Show yourself!
(The temperature in the cavern plummets as something that was very small rips the energy from the air in order to become very large again. The Master falls to the ground, staring up at what he has summoned. Tremors ripple through the earth all the way to the barrier, and wake Jo.)

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

(Glass and furniture goes flying as the church bells are shaken to ring in the tower.)
HAWTHORNE: The demon! If he comes out, we shall all die!

[Church cavern]

MASTER: No! No, stop! Go back to the mark! Go back! You will destroy me! No! No!

Episode Four

[Heat barrier]

(UNIT's equivalent of REME have been busy, and are loading equipment into the back of a Land Rover.)
DOCTOR: Now get a move on with the heat exchanger. We've got to get it charged and through this barrier and down to the village before it's too late.

[Church cavern]

(The Master is crawling on the floor.)
MASTER: No! No, back! Back!
(He grabs a metal candle holder and brandishes it.)
MASTER: In the name of the Unspeakable One, back! Nakmia sayamat. Back!

[The Cloven Hoof guest room]

JO: Where am I? The cavern. I must get to the cavern.
(Jo opens the bedroom door and hears voices from the bar below.)
YATES [OC]: Well, I'm going down to the cavern to see what's going on.
HAWTHORNE [OC]: You can't, dear boy, the Doctor told us to stay here.
BENTON [OC]: Well, anyway, we can't just leave Jo here alone.
(Jo looks out of the front window, then the back, and climbs out onto the flat roof of an extension building that has a convenient ladder propped against it. She climbs down to the ground and walks around the building, where Bessie is parked out front. Checking that she is in the clear, she heads to the church.)

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

YATES: I'm going to see what's happening.
HAWTHORNE: Oh, you can't, it's too dangerous.
BENTON: Look, the Doctor told us to stop here, sir.
YATES: Oh, all right.

[Heat barrier]

(Osgood is trying to connect up the Doctor's device as soldiers roll out drums of cable.)
DOCTOR: No, man, no. You're trying to channel the entire output of the National Power Complex through one transistor. Reverse it.
OSGOOD: Reverse what?
DOCTOR: Reverse the polarity.
OSGOOD: Look, we'd get along much faster if we knew what we were doing.
DOCTOR: Yes, I couldn't agree with you more, Sergeant. Now let's concentrate, shall we?
BRIGADIER: Right, I've fixed with Nuton for the power to be off for fifteen minutes. Ready to link up?
OSGOOD: No, sir.
BRIGADIER: Well, when will you be ready, for heaven's sake?
DOCTOR: About next Christmas, I shouldn't wonder. At a rough estimate, of course.
OSGOOD: Look, if you push ten thousand volts through this lash up you'll blow it anyway!
BRIGADIER: Just do as you're told, Sergeant. The Doctor knows what he's doing.
OSGOOD: Right, sir. Right, Jenkins, have you got that junction box lined up?
BRIGADIER: Do you know what you're doing?
DOCTOR: My dear chap, I can't wait to find out.

[Church cavern]

(Something with hairy thighs and cloven hooves for feet is towering over the Master. It's voice echoes around the enclosed space.)
AZAL: Speak!
MASTER: I am the Master. I called you here.
AZAL: That I know. Tell me why you now call me.
MASTER: Give me your knowledge and your power.
AZAL: Why?
MASTER: So that I may rule these primitives on Earth here, and help them to fulfill your plan.
AZAL: You are not one of their kind.
MASTER: No, I'm superior to them. That's why I should be their leader.
AZAL: There is another here of your race.
MASTER: He has been destroyed.
AZAL: No, he lives. I would speak with him.
MASTER: I think not!
AZAL: Take care, creature! With your few pitiful grains of knowledge, you have summoned me here, but I am not your slave and you are not immortal.
MASTER: Forgive me, Mighty One, forgive me. Nevertheless, I claim that which is rightfully mine.
AZAL: Your mind is superior to mankind's, and your will is stronger.
MASTER: Then I am to be your choice?
AZAL: I shall consider. Now leave.
MASTER: But you will come again?
AZAL: I shall appear but once more, so be warned. There is danger. My race destroys its failures. Remember Atlantis.
MASTER: Yes, but surely I
AZAL: Be silent! I am the last of the Daemons. This planet smells to me of failure. It may be that I shall destroy it. You still wish me to come once more?
MASTER: I do.
AZAL: Very well. Now go!
(The Master runs up into the vestry as heat surges through the building, given off as Azal shrinks itself again. The energy given off rushes out through the village as a hot wind, blowing Jo against the churchyard wall and throwing Yates to the floor in the pub.)

[Heat barrier]

DOCTOR: It's going. I must get back. The next time could be the finish. Sergeant Osgood, can you operate that machine now?
OSGOOD: Well, I'm not quite sure.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, you'll have to. We may have very little time left.
OSGOOD: Wait, Doctor. I still don't understand how you lock the pulse generator to the feedback circuit. They'll never be in phase.
DOCTOR: Well, of course they won't. That's the whole point.
OSGOOD: Well, how do you do it then?
DOCTOR: Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. All right, I'll explain once again. Only this time, please listen.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

(Azal returns to the decorated stone and the heat dissipates.)
YATES: Jo. Jo! Jo!

[The Cloven Hoof guest room]

YATES: You all right, Jo?
(Yates sees the open back window.)
YATES: Little idiot!

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

HAWTHORNE: You all right?
BENTON: More or less. How about you?
HAWTHORNE: Shaken, I'll admit.
YATES: Jo's gone. Out of the window. I'm going after her.
BENTON: Well, do you know where she is, sir?
YATES: I know all right. She'll have gone to the cavern.
HAWTHORNE: No!
BENTON: Trust her.
YATES: Look, when the Doc gets back, tell him what's happened.
BENTON: Look, be careful, sir. I don't want you to cop it like I did.
YATES: Huh, not if I can help it.
(Yates leaves. Miss Hawthorne has poured two stiff drinks.)
HAWTHORNE: Sergeant?
BENTON: Thank you.

[Church Vestry]

(Bert the landlord is getting his orders.)
MASTER: And make sure you do the job properly. The Doctor's been in my way for far too long. You know, I was very foolish to speak with Azal alone. Next time, I shall use the full ceremony. Every possible member of the coven must be present. If I'm going to control Azal, I need every ounce of power I can summon up. Very well.
(Yates hides behind a gravestone as Bert leaves the church and drives off in his car. Yates runs into the church. Jo collapses by the wall.)

[Road]

(The Doctor has drawn a circuit diagram on the motorbike's windshield.)
DOCTOR: And it comes out here. Right?
OSGOOD: Right. I think.
DOCTOR: Good grief, man, it's as simple as Einstein's Special theory of Relativity.
BRIGADIER: We'll manage, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Good. And when you get that thing finished, bring it through the barrier and down to the village at once, all right?
(The Doctor rides off on the motorbike.)
BRIGADIER: Do you know, Sergeant, I sometimes wish I worked in a bank. Right, at the double there!

[Church cavern]

(Jo wakes on the ground and briefly has second thoughts about her plan. Then she runs round the church, into the vestry and down the stairs. The sight of the gargoyle in his niche makes her cry out, then someone puts their hand over her mouth.)
YATES: Shush. They're in and out all the time.
JO: Mike, what
YATES: Why didn't you stay in bed?
JO: I had to find out what was going on.
YATES: You're an idiot. This place is alive with booby traps.
JO: What?
YATES: Spells, elementals, the Doctor's forcefields.
JO: Where, where are they?
YATES: All over. Here, I'll show you. Give me that book there or something.
JO: Yes.
YATES: Now watch this.
(He throws the register onto the decorated stone, and it flies apart, pages going everywhere.)
JO: It's a trick. A horrible conjuring trick.
YATES: You think so? Remember Benton? Now come on, let's get out of. Shush!
(They hide behind a railing as someone in black surplice comes in and puts candles on the altar. Meanwhile, Bert is taking pot shots at the Doctor as he rides towards the village. The Doctor falls off the bike and runs for the trees. Bert follows. In the cavern, an ornate dagger has been placed on the altar.)
JO: Mike, I'm scared.
YATES: Don't worry. The Doc'll be here soon, and Benton knows we're here.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

(But Benton can't tell anyone else.)
BENTON: Hello, Greyhound. This is Trap Three. Do you read me? Over. Hello, Greyhound, Greyhound. Do you read me? Over.
HAWTHORNE: I've bought you a nice cuppa, Sergeant. I hope you like china.
BENTON: For goodness sake, Miss Hawthorne.
HAWTHORNE: What's the matter? Don't you like tea?
BENTON: Something's gone badly wrong. We've no idea what's happening to Miss Grant and the Captain, the Doctor should be back here by now, I can't get through to the Brigadier and you're nattering on about tea.
HAWTHORNE: You must learn the art of waiting, Sergeant. The Doctor will come, or else he won't, and that's all that can be said. Now, milk or lemon?
BENTON: Hello, Greyhound, Greyhound. Do you read me? Over.

[Heat barrier]

BRIGADIER: Sergeant?
OSGOOD: Sir?
BRIGADIER: Is it you making that horrible racket? I can't get a thing through. The air's thick with it.
OSGOOD: Yes, sir, it is. Testing, you see, sir. This is fascinating. It's not right yet but even on the battery, it's pumping it out. It's a sort of controlled resonance frequency you see, sir.
BRIGADIER: Yes, well, never mind the mumbo-jumbo. Keep the wretched thing switched off until it's ready.
OSGOOD: I'm sorry, sir, I can't. I must finish the tests.
BRIGADIER: Well, how long are you going to be?
OSGOOD: About a minute, sir. I've got the hang of it now. (Bang, and Osgood has a sooty face) Half an hour, sir. At least.

[Vicarage]

(Someone is hammering at the door. The Master answers it.)
BERT: Magister, I'm sorry.
MASTER: The Doctor got away.
BERT: How could you know that? Well, yes he did. You see, what happened
MASTER: Excuses waste time. Where is he?
BERT: I lost him in the woods. Expect he's making his way back to the village by now.
MASTER: Then we must see that he is given a suitable welcome, mustn't we?

[UNIT Mobile HQ]

(The radios are working again.)
BRIGADIER: What's the matter with you, Benton? I want to speak to the Doctor. Over.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

BENTON: But I, but I thought he was still with you, sir. Over.

[UNIT Mobile HQ]

BRIGADIER: No, he left here oh, a good forty minutes ago. Hasn't

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

(Miss Hawthorne looks up from her crocheting.)
BRIGADIER [OC]: He turned up yet?
BENTON: Well, no, sir. Not a sign of him. Do you suppose he's all right, sir? Over.
BRIGADIER [OC]: Maybe he's piled up that wretched motorbike.
BENTON: Do you want me to go and look for him, sir? Over.

[UNIT Mobile HQ]

BRIGADIER: No, better give him a bit longer. But if he does turn up will you tell him that we're running into a bit of trouble with our feedback phasing. Is that right, Osgood?
OSGOOD: Yes, sir.
BRIGADIER: Yes, that's it, Benton. Tell him that, will you? Over and out.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

BENTON: That's it then.
HAWTHORNE: More waiting, Sergeant.
BENTON: Yes, well, the Captain and Miss Grant should have been back ages ago, and the Doctor seems to have disappeared completely. Look, I'm going to go and have a nose around out there.
HAWTHORNE: You stay where you are. I'll go and look for them.
BENTON: I'm sorry, ma'am. Would you please do as you're told.
HAWTHORNE: Anyone in sight?
BENTON: No, just a few villagers. Could you tell the Doctor I've gone to the cavern.
HAWTHORNE: Wait. Listen.
(Music starts up outside.)
BENTON: Well, what do they thing they're doing?
(A Maypole is on the village green, and Morris Dancers with sticks lead by Bert in a 'tattered' coat are approaching. A housewife takes her little girl indoors and others close their windows. Villagers go to the pole and take the ribbons.)
HAWTHORNE: Charming.
BENTON: Yeah, they're round the twist, if you ask me.
HAWTHORNE: But it's May day. We always have the Morris Dancers on May day. It's traditional.
BENTON: Hey, look, there's the Doctor!

[Village Green]

(A second morris dance begins and the villagers begin to weave the ribbons round the pole. The Doctor is driven towards it by the Fool with his bladder on a stick.)
DOCTOR: Yes, yes, most amusing.
(Bert directs the morris to encircle the Doctor with their sticks.)
DOCTOR: Now please, let me pass. Frankly, any time I'd gladly join you but I
(The Doctor is pushed to the ground.)
DOCTOR: What on Earth is going on? What are you doing? What on Earth is this?
(Bert points his snub-nosed revolver at the Doctor.)
BERT: You're being invited to join our May day revels, Doctor. I'm sure you don't want to disappoint us, or Mister Magister.

[The Cloven Hoof bar]

HAWTHORNE: They seem to have stopped.
BENTON: Yeah. Hey, what's happening? Well, that doesn't look very traditional.
(With sticks around his neck, the Doctor is hustled to the May pole where his hands are tied behind it.)
BENTON: Look, I've got to go and help him.
HAWTHORNE: No, you can't. There are too many of them.
(Benton opens the main door and is promptly attacked by a morris man. Benton takes a beating until Miss Hawthorne thumps the man over the head with her handbag.)
HAWTHORNE: Did he hurt you?
BENTON: What happened?
HAWTHORNE: I hit him with my reticule. (crystal ball) On these occasions, the outcome's a certainty.
BENTON: Very handy. Thank you.
HAWTHORNE: I always carry it with me. No, Sergeant, wait. Look, I know these people. They're not wicked. Well, most of them anyway.
BENTON: So?
HAWTHORNE: So, it's up to us to explain to them how mistaken they are. Now, listen carefully.

[Village Green]

(The Doctor is being tied to the pole with the ribbons.)
DOCTOR: The Master's planning to make slaves of you all. I'm the only one who has a chance of stopping him.
BERT: He's lying. He is the enemy. Mister Magister will care for you, give you everything you've ever wanted.
DOCTOR: That's nonsense. All the Master will bring upon you is disaster!
BERT: He is the enemy! He's a black witch! A witch, do you hear? A witch and you've always known what you must do with a witch, haven't you?
ALL: Yeah, yeah.
BERT: Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live.
VILLAGER: That's what they say.
DOCTOR: Are you out of your mind?
BERT: Shut up. That's right, friends. Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live. Burn him!
THORPE: Burn him!
ALL: Burn him! Burn him!

[Church cavern]

(The coven is meeting for the third summoning.)
MASTER: Eoh evotay.
COVEN: Eoh evotay.
MASTER: As my will, so mote it be.
COVEN: Nemas.
MASTER: Harken to my voice, oh, Dark One, ancient and awful, supreme in artifice, bearer of power, be present here at my command and truly do my will. Ava, avara, agarbala, gar, gardoal, galdina! As my will, so mote it be.
COVEN: As thy will, so mote it be!
(Bok's eyes light up.)

[Village Green]

(The Doctor is surrounded by faggots of wood up to the knees. Miss Hawthorne runs out of the pub as Thorpe lights a brand and hold it up.)
BERT: Now!
HAWTHORNE: Stop! You will bring a terrible retribution upon yourselves if you persist.
BERT: Shut up, you silly old fool!
HAWTHORNE: You would dare to harm the great Wizard Qui Quae Quod?
(For the non-Latin scholars, that's Who, Who, Who.)
THORPE: Wizard?
HAWTHORNE: You wouldn't listen to me before and now you're in the power of the Magister. You know I speak the truth.
BERT: Get on with it, man.
HAWTHORNE: No, wait, listen to me. Under the Magister you have been frightened, injured, your property destroyed. Serve the great Qui Quae Quod. In him lies peace and great joy.
BERT: If he's such a great magician, let's see him untie himself.
DOCTOR: You choose to mock the great Qui Quae Quod? Well, I will not.
BERT: Because you can't!
HAWTHORNE: Give him a sign of your power, O mighty one!
DOCTOR: What had you mind?
HAWTHORNE: I know. That lamp. Shatter it.
(She points at a poor defenceless street light.)
DOCTOR: Shatter it. Yes. Lamp, I order you to shatter!
(And it does.)
DOCTOR: You see? That could have been you. Now, all of you look at the, er, weathercock on the church tower?
(Hawthorne nods, and Benton takes aim with his service pistol, now fitted with a long silencer.)
DOCTOR: Weathercock, now!
(The weathercock spins.)
VILLAGER: He must be a magician. He is a magician!
HAWTHORNE: Bert, drop that torch. You're beaten and you know it!
BERT: Am I?
(Benton shoots the brand out of Bert's hand.)
DOCTOR: There, that'll teach you. Daughter of light, would you kindly untie my bonds? 
BERT: You don't scare me with a lot of daft tricks. Mister Magister has the real power.
HAWTHORNE: His power is worth nothing in comparison.
BERT: Right. Well let's see if you can turn aside a bullet.
(Benton can't get a line on Bert now, villagers are in the way.)
DOCTOR: I'll give you one more chance. Look behind you.
BERT: That's the oldest trick in the book.
DOCTOR: Very well. Let my familiar spirit bring that car to me!
(Bessie starts up and trundles over. Benton is impressed but Bert has his back to her.)
BERT: You don't frighten me, you know. Do you think I'm as stupid as this lot?
(Benton leaves the pub as Bert finally hears Bessie behind him. He turns, fires a shot and Bessie gently runs him down.)
VILLAGER: That's it. He is a god.
HAWTHORNE: You really are a magician.
DOCTOR: I'm sorry to disappoint you, madame, but I were, I'd hardly need your assistance in extricating me from this, this sacrificial gift wrapping.
BENTON: How on Earth did you do that, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Elemental, my dear Benton.
(Bert gets up and tries to run for it, but Benton pounces on him.)
BENTON: Oh, no, you don't, chummie. We've all got a date with the Master, haven't we.

[Church cavern]

MASTER: Og ot erus saw bmal eht tnew yram taht, erehwyreve dna, wons sa etihw saw eceelf sti, bmal elttila dah yram!
COVEN: Eoh evotay!
MASTER: Azal! We have power over life, you and I. Accept this life I now dedicate to thee.
(A chicken is brought forward.)
MASTER: Atanee bmal elttila dah yram!
(The Master elevates the dagger.)
JO: No! Stop it! It's evil! Don't you see that? It's evil!
MASTER: You are too late, my dear! Eho, eho, Azal!
COVEN: Eko, eko, Azal!
(A wind starts up and a figure grows up out of the decorated stone. Hind quarters of a goat, bare chest and horns sprouting out of the hair on its head.)
MASTER: Azal!

Episode Five

[Heat barrier]

BRIGADIER: The last appearance, that's what the Doctor said.
OSGOOD: I'm working as fast as I can.
BRIGADIER: Well, it doesn't seem to be fast enough. You have five minutes, Sergeant. Right, we're on our way in five minutes!

[Village Green]

(The villagers pick themselves up from the grass. A couple of men hold Bert securely.)
HAWTHORNE: The third appearance.
BENTON: In the cavern.
DOCTOR: Where else?
BENTON: We'd better get over there, hasn't we?
DOCTOR: Wait, all of you.
BERT: See? This chap's frightened!
DOCTOR: Well, of course I'm frightened. So should you be, and your friend Mister Magister.

[Church cavern]

MASTER: Azal, welcome!
(Jo hides behind Yates and his pistol.)
MASTER: Bok, stop them!
(Yates shoots at Bok, but the bullets just bounce of the stone. Bok zaps an energy bolt at the wall and Yates surrenders.)
MASTER: You are very wise, Captain. Prepare the girl in the ceremonial tabard. She will make a welcome addition to this sabbat.
JO: No, please! Don't let me go! Mike, help me please! No, let me go!
(Jo is taken away. Yates is knocked out and dragged out of the cavern and tied up face down in the vestry.)

[Village Green]

DOCTOR: Now we're facing the greatest danger the world has ever known. Now, look, I've got to tell you the truth.
HAWTHORNE: (sotto) Doctor, no.
DOCTOR: (sotto) I've got to risk it.
THORPE: What are you talking about?
DOCTOR: I'm not a magician or a wizard or anything of the sort.
BERT: See! I told you!
DOCTOR: But neither is the Master. I've tricked you, yes, but only to save you from him.
BERT: To save your own life, you mean.
DOCTOR: Yes, of course, that too.
BERT: What? Well, there you are! Do you hear, the lot of you? He admits it!
THORPE: Just pipe down for two minutes, Bert.
BERT: But you heard him.
THORPE: Shut up! We want to hear what he's got to say.
HAWTHORNE: But your car? How did you make it move by itself?
DOCTOR: Science, not sorcery, Miss Hawthorne. Look.
(The Doctor holds up the remote control and makes Bessie honk her horn and flash her headlights.)
VILLAGER: That's amazing.
BENTON: I'll be blowed.
DOCTOR: And your Mister Magister uses no more magic than that.
BERT: You're talking rubbish. The Master's a magician I tell you!
DOCTOR: All his feats are based on science. Either ours or the secret science of the Daemons.
BERT: Well, there you are. That proves you're talking nonsense. How could he have called him up in the first place except by sorcery?
DOCTOR: Well, he uses violent emotions. Fear, hatred, greed.
THORPE: How?
DOCTOR: Well, the emotions of a group of ordinary human beings generate a tremendous charge of psychokinetic energy. This the Master channels for his own purpose.
HAWTHORNE: But that is magic. That's precisely what black magic is.
DOCTOR: No, Miss Hawthorne, I'm afraid not.
HAWTHORNE: Are you trying to tell me that the invocations, the rituals, even the sabbat itself are just so much window dressing?
DOCTOR: No, no, no, of course not. No, they are essential to generate and control the psionic forces, and to control the Daemon himself.
BENTON: Look, shouldn't we get over there and sort this Daemon thing out?
DOCTOR: How?
BENTON: Well, I could get the men
DOCTOR: Yes?
BENTON: Well, we could
DOCTOR: Exactly. All we can do is wait.
BENTON: Well, what for?
DOCTOR: The energy exchanger. This machine that the Brigadier is building for me. With that I should be able to drain off our visitor's energy. Then perhaps we can sort him out.

[Church cavern]

MASTER: Azal, the time for decision draws near. Once more, I demand the power
AZAL: You demand?
MASTER: Yes, and why not? Who in the whole galaxy is not my inferior? There is not one creature.
AZAL: Not even one?
MASTER: Not one! Save the last of the Daemons.
(Jo is dragged back in, wearing a white gown.)
JO: No, please, let me go!
MASTER: Azal, accept this offering as a token of our fealty. As my will, so mote it be!
COVEN: As thy will, so mote it be!
MASTER: Eoh evotay, Azal!
COVEN: Eoh evotay! Eoh evotay!
(Upstairs in the vestry, Yates wakes up, rolls over and gets to his feet. He takes a quick look down the stairs to the cavern then runs outside.)

[Village Green]

YATES: Doctor! Doctor!
BENTON: Hold him.
(The Doctor, Benton and Miss Hawthorne run to Yates.)
YATES: Doctor! Doctor, it's Jo.
DOCTOR: Jo? I thought she was still in the pub?
(Benton unties Yates' hands.)
YATES: They've got her in the cavern.
DOCTOR: What?
YATES: That creature's in there. The Master calls him Azal.
HAWTHORNE: Azal? Of course! Azael, the fallen angel.
DOCTOR: Walkie talkie. Hello, Brigadier? Are you there?

[Heat barrier]

BRIGADIER: That you, Doctor?

[Village Green]

BRIGADIER [OC]: Over.
DOCTOR: Look, they've got Jo. That machine must come through now. Now, do you understand?!

[Heat barrier]

DOCTOR [OC]: Now!
BRIGADIER: We're on our way, Doctor.

[Village Green]

DOCTOR: Good. And put a watch up on that barrow, will you? Just in case the Daemon's ship reactivates.

[Heat barrier]

BRIGADIER: Will do, Doctor. Over and out. You heard him, Sergeant. Now. 
OSGOOD: I
BRIGADIER: That's an order, Sergeant. Now!

[Village Green]

DOCTOR: Come on, Brigadier. Get a move on.

[Church cavern]

MASTER: I'm sorry, Miss Grant, but you are to be sacrificed in a noble cause.
JO: No! No!

[Road]

(The power from the grid is building in the machine, and smoke is starting to come out of it.)
OSGOOD: It'll never take it, I tell you.
BRIGADIER: It must. Keep trying.

[Village Green]

DOCTOR: Right, now some of you that way, but spread out. The rest of you, follow me.

[Church cavern]

ACOLYTE: Mister Magister, they're coming, they're coming.
JO: Doctor, help!
(The Master sends Bok out of the cavern.)

[Village Green]

(Where its appearance at the church gate stops the posse in its tracks.)
YATES: Right, Benton. You keep us covered. We'll get in round the back.
DOCTOR: No. We must wait for the Brigadier.
YATES: And what about Jo?
DOCTOR: We won't help her by committing suicide.
(Bert gets free of Thorpe and another man, and runs towards the church.)
BERT: Magister! Magister!
(Bok blocks his way.)
BERT: No, no. A friend. I'm a friend.
(Bok zaps him into nothingness.)
DOCTOR: You see? What's going on, Brigadier?

[Heat barrier]

DOCTOR [OC]: You must hurry!
BRIGADIER: We're up to the maximum now, Doctor. It's still no good.
DOCTOR [OC]: You'll have to use the booster.
OSGOOD: If you do, sir, she'll blow us all sky high!
BRIGADIER: We're coming through, Doctor. Over and out. Booster on.
OSGOOD: But sir.
BRIGADIER: Damn it, man. Get on with it.
(Osgood hesitates so the Brigadier pushes down the lever labelled Boost himself.)

[Church cavern]

MASTER: O mighty Azal, in the name of Atame, I dedicate this offering!
ACOLYTE: No, Magister, it's not right!
MASTER: To do my will shall be the whole of the law.
COVEN: To do thy will shall be the whole of the law.
ACOLYTE: It's not right, I tell you.
MASTER: Obey me!

[Heat barrier]

(The machine is smoking badly, and the needle is in the red.)
BRIGADIER: Look, it's working!
(An archway appears in the heat barrier. The Brigadier tests it with his swagger stick, which smokes but does not burst into flames.)
BRIGADIER: Right, it's still hot, but passable. Right, start up and keep to the tunnel.
(The Brigadier drives his car through the arch, and the troop carriers follow.)

[Church cavern]

MASTER: Obey me.
(Two men start to lie Jo down on the cleared altar, when Azal holds its head in pain.)

[Village Green]

DOCTOR: Look, what's going on, Brigadier?
BRIGADIER [OC]: We're through, Doctor. Over.
DOCTOR: What, all of you?
BRIGADIER [OC]: Yes, but not the machine.
DOCTOR: Well, that should have come through first.
BENTON: Doctor, look.
(Bok is staggering around.)
DOCTOR: The exchanger is working. It's bleeding off the energy.

[Heat barrier]

BRIGADIER: Come on, man, bring it through! Get a move on!
OSGOOD: Sir! Right, Jenkins.
(The Land Rover and machine drive through the archway.)
BRIGADIER: You can stop worrying, Doctor. We're through.
DOCTOR [OC]: And about time, too. Now get it over here fast!
BRIGADIER: Right.
OSGOOD: Sir! Sir, I can't stop it! It's running away!
BRIGADIER: Osgood, out of it! Get down, all of you! Osgood, get down, man!
(They clear the vehicle just before the machine goes Boom!)

[Village Green]

DOCTOR: Brigadier? Brigadier, are you all right?
BRIGADIER [OC]: The machine's gone west. Blown itself up. Be with you right away. Over and out.
DOCTOR: A fat lot of good that'll do. Right, keep the others back, Captain Yates, I'm going in before that creature recovers.
YATES: I'll come with you, Doctor.
DOCTOR: Alone!
THORPE: You can't go in now, sir. You said yourself it would be suicide.
YATES: Doctor, wait!
(The Doctor dodges round the still-staggering Bok and runs for the church. He slams the vestry door shut just as Bok sends an energy bolt at him.)

[Church cavern]

MASTER: Ah, Doctor, I've been expecting you. You've saved me a lot of trouble by coming here. I'm most grateful to you.
DOCTOR: Hello, Jo. I cannot tell you how glad I am to see you.
MASTER: How very touching.

[Village Green]

(The UNIT convoy arrives in record time for a five mile dash.)
BRIGADIER: Where's the Doctor?
YATES: Gone in there, sir.
BRIGADIER: Then what are we waiting for? Let's get after him.
YATES: Wait, sir. Look.
(Bok is watching the newcomers.)
BRIGADIER: What the blazes is that? Some kind of ornament?
YATES: Not exactly, sir. Watch.
(Yates throws a rock at Bok, who zaps it into atoms.)
BRIGADIER: Yes, I see what you mean. Never mind, we'll soon fix him. Jenkins!
JENKINS: Sir.
BRIGADIER: Chap with the wings there. Five rounds rapid
(No effect, of course.)

[Church cavern]

MASTER: You realise, of course, that you're a doomed man, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Oh, I'm a dead man. I knew that as soon as I came through that door, so you'd better watch out. You see, I've nothing to lose, have I?
MASTER: Enough! Azal, destroy him!
AZAL: Who is this?!
MASTER: My enemy and yours, Azal. Destroy him!
AZAL: This is the one we spoke of. He too is not of this planet.
MASTER: He is a meddler and a fool.
AZAL: He is not a fool, yet he has done a foolish thing coming here. Why did you come?
DOCTOR: I came to talk to you.
AZAL: Talk then.
DOCTOR: Certainly. But first let her go.
MASTER: No!
(Azal sends electricity at the acolytes holding Jo, and they free her.)
JO: Doctor!
DOCTOR: Are you all right, Jo?
JO: I am now.
AZAL: You wish to talk?
DOCTOR: Yes. I want you to leave this planet while you still can.
AZAL: You are bold.
DOCTOR: Why not? I've got a machine outside that can annihilate you.
AZAL: You lie.
DOCTOR: You've already felt its power.
AZAL: It is destroyed.
DOCTOR: One of them, yes. Not both.
AZAL: You lie. There was but one.
JO: Doctor?
AZAL: You have a regard for truth. Why do you lie?
DOCTOR: To try and make you listen to me.
AZAL: Why should I? I see no consequence of value.
MASTER: Then kill him. Kill him now!
AZAL: Very well.
(Azal aims his hand at the Doctor.)
JO: No!
DOCTOR: If you kill me now, you will wonder throughout eternity whether you should have listened to my words.

[Village Green]

(The villagers have taken shelter indoors as UNIT continue to try and shoot Bok.)
YATES: Might as well use a peashooter on four inch armour. Sergeant, get the bazooka set up over there, quick.
BENTON: Right, sir. Right, you with me.

[Church cavern]

MASTER: Well? You waste time. I order you to kill him, Azal!
AZAL: I command. I do not obey.
MASTER: But I called you here and you came?
AZAL: I answered your call because the time was come for my awakening. The time has come for the completion of the experiment or its destruction.
MASTER: Then fulfill your mission by granting the ultimate power to me. Who else is there strong enough to give these humans the leadership they need?
DOCTOR: I seem to remember somebody else speaking like that. What was the bounder's name? Hitler. Yes, that's right, Adolf Hitler. Or was it Genghis Khan?
MASTER: Azal, I have the will. You yourself said so.
AZAL: I am still not convinced.
DOCTOR: I'm very pleased to hear it.
AZAL: You wish to see this planet destroyed?
DOCTOR: By no means. You see, I have an alternative.
AZAL: State it.
DOCTOR: Leave humanity alone. Just go. You've done enough harm.
AZAL: We gave knowledge to man.
DOCTOR: You certainly did. Thanks to you man can now blow up the world and he probably will. He can poison the water and the very air he breathes. He's already started. He can
AZAL: Enough! Is man such a failure then? Shall I destroy him?
MASTER: No! A strong leader can force him to learn.
AZAL: You are right. I have decided. I shall pass on my power.
MASTER: O mighty Azal, I thank you.
AZAL: But not to you. To him.
DOCTOR: No! No, I don't want it!

[Churchyard]

(Bok zaps one soldier as the others fire from behind gravestones. Benton brings the bazooka to the retaining wall and takes aim.)
YATES: Fire!
(Bok is shattered into gravel.)
BRIGADIER: Well done, Sergeant.
BENTON: Just a minute, sir. Look!
(Bok reforms from the pieces.)

[Church cavern]

AZAL: You refuse my gift?
DOCTOR: Of course I do! Don't you understand? I want you to leave. I want you to go away and give man a chance to grow up.
AZAL: I cannot. My instructions are precise. I bequeath my power or I destroy all.
MASTER: Then you will give your power to me?
AZAL: I shall. Time is short.
MASTER: What about him?
AZAL: He is not rational. He is disruptive. He must be eliminated.
(Azal's electricity starts to play over the Doctor's body, then Jo stands in front of him.)
JO: No! No, he's a good man! Kill me, not him!
(Jo braces herself for the kill shot, but Azal clutches his wrist in pain as his power turns in on himself.)
AZAL: This action does not relate. There is no data. It does not relate. Go! Leave me, all of you!
(Bristling with surplus energy, Azal totters and the humans flee the building.)

[Churchyard]

(UNIT continue their assault on Bok until it sits down and assumes its original gargoyle pose.)
BRIGADIER: Cease firing!
(The Doctor, Jo and the former coven flee the heat-filled church. The Brigadier taps Bok with his stick to check it is now harmless.)
DOCTOR: Run for it, Brigadier!

[Village Green]

(Somehow the Master has got ahead of everyone as the church goes KaBOOM!! throwing the runners to the ground. The women come out of their homes and Benton trains his pistol on the Master.)
BENTON: Get up. Don't try anything.
BRIGADIER: What happened in there, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Well, by a ridiculous and foolhardy act of self-sacrifice, Jo here has managed to save us.
JO: I did?
DOCTOR: You did. You see, Azal couldn't face an act as irrational and as illogical as her being prepared to give up her life for me. Look, Jo, why don't you go and get out of that ridiculous garb?
JO: Okay.
YATES: So what happened?
DOCTOR: Well, all his power was turned against himself. You might say he blew a fuse.
(Boom!)
YATES: Greyhound Two, come in, please. Over.
CHALMERS [OC]: Chalmers here at the dig, sir. Are you all right? Over,
YATES: Couldn't be better. What's happening?
CHALMERS [OC]: Big bang at the dig, sir.
DOCTOR: The spaceship. Automatic self-destruct, I suppose.
CHALMERS [OC]: And the barrier's cleared itself. Over.
YATES: Good show. We're coming out now with one prisoner. Over and out.
BRIGADIER: Benton, get ready to move out.
BENTON: Yes, sir. Right, you lot, you heard the man. The picnic's over.
(The Master throws his cope over Benton and runs to Bessie. Benton shoots at him and the Brigadier joins in as the Master drives away.)
DOCTOR: Stop firing. You'll damage Bessie.
BRIGADIER: Do you want him to get away?
DOCTOR: Don't worry, Bessie'll bring him back.
(Jo is back in her proper clothes as Bessie turns a circle and returns the prisoner.)
BRIGADIER: How on Earth did you do that?
DOCTOR: Simple, if you know how.
BRIGADIER: Right, Benton, get them moved out. And take him with you. Maximum security guard.
BENTON: Yes, sir. Right, get moving!
DOCTOR: And look after him. I want to deal with him later.
MASTER: Do you, Doctor? You always were an optimist, weren't you.
DOCTOR: Thank you for the compliment.
BENTON: All right, move.
(The Master gets out of Bessie and into the back of a Land Rover, accompanied by six burly soldiers with their rifles pointing at him, and is driven away. The villagers boo him as he leaves.)
HAWTHORNE: Listen.
DOCTOR: To what?
JO: Yes, the birds are singing again.
HAWTHORNE: Oh, and smell the flowers.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, it makes a change from the smell of sulphur, doesn't it?
HAWTHORNE: The May day miracle has happened again. The Earth is born anew.
(The morris starts up again.)
BENTON: All under way, sir.
HAWTHORNE: Sergeant, we must do the fertility dance to celebrate.
BENTON: Oh, no, I'm sorry, ma'am. I'm still rather busy.
HAWTHORNE: Oh, nonsense, Sergeant. Come along.
JO: Come on, Doctor.
YATES: Fancy a dance, Brigadier?
BRIGADIER: It's kind of you, Captain Yates. I think I'd rather have a pint.
(The May pole is being wrapped in its ribbons once again.)
DOCTOR: (dancing) You're right, Jo, there is magic in the world after all.

<Back to the episode listing

Doctor Who and related marks are trademarks of BBC . Copyright 1963, Present. The web pages on this site are for educational and entertainment purposes only. All other copyrights property of their respective holders.