Daedalus
Original Airdate: 14 Jan, 2005

[Corridor]

TUCKER: I admit it. I've got a few butterflies. Okay, more than a few.
ARCHER: You haven't stopped talking about this for a week.
TUCKER: Well, it's different for you. You grew up with the man. When I was seven, my mom bought me a book about him. Emory Erickson, Father of the Transporter. I made her read it to me every night for a month. That book is the reason I became an engineer.
ARCHER: Did I ever tell you about meeting Zefram Cochrane?
TUCKER: Yeah, only about fifty times.
ARCHER: Then you know I understand how you feel.

[Transporter alcove]

(Tucker relieves the officer then starts smartening up his uniform.)
ARCHER: You want a mirror?
TUCKER: You've got a mean streak in you, you know that?
(Archer nods, and Trip beams aboard a tall young woman and a man in a wheelchair.)
EMORY: Nothing seems to be missing,
ARCHER: Hello, Emory.
EMORY: Jonathan, look at you. I always suspected you'd be famous, just didn't think that you'd be more famous than me.
(They embrace)
DANICA: Jon.
ARCHER: Good to see you. (they kiss and hug)
DANICA: Oh, we have a lot of catching up to do.
EMORY: Do it later. I want a tour of this place.
ARCHER: My Chief Engineer, Commander Charles Tucker.
TUCKER: It's an honour.
EMORY: Guess you and I'll be spending some time together.
TUCKER: I'm looking forward to it.
ARCHER: Danica. Trip.

[Corridor]

(Danica pushes the wheelchair as they head off along the corridor again.)
EMORY: I hope you don't mind that I'm borrowing your ship, Captain.
ARCHER: As long as you return it in good condition.
EMORY: Don't know if I can promise that. When this test is over, Enterprise and all of Starfleet could be obsolete.
ARCHER: Sounds like you're trying to put me out of a job.

Captain's Log, supplemental: In preparation for Doctor Erickson's experiment, we've reduced power on all but essential areas of the ship.

[Mess hall - reduced lighting]

TUCKER: Feel like some company? We haven't talked much since Vulcan. How are you holding up?
T'POL: I've been fine.
TUCKER: I've been seeing you by yourself a lot.
T'POL: I'm reading the Kir'Shara.
TUCKER: How is it?
T'POL: Interesting.
TUCKER: Interesting?
T'POL: Extremely.
TUCKER: Look, I know what you're going through. Losing a family member, it's the toughest thing there is.
T'POL: I see no point in discussing it. It's in the past.
TUCKER: Your mother died a week ago.
T'POL: Talking won't change that.
TUCKER: It may change the way you feel about it.
T'POL: I don't feel anything about it.
TUCKER: You can tell yourself that,
T'POL: It's the truth.
TUCKER: You know, when Lizzie died, there were times I wanted to just close up, retreat inside myself,
T'POL: Trip, I appreciate what you're trying to do, but it's not necessary.
TUCKER: You're fine? Well, if you ever do want to talk, let me know. I'll see you.

[Captain's mess]

(Five people around the table looks somewhat crowded.)
EMORY: Sub-quantum teleportation. You step on to a transporter on Earth, a few seconds later, you're on Vulcan.
TUCKER: That's over sixteen light years.
EMORY: That's just for starters. Theoretically, there's no limit to the distance. One of the things we're here to test. You tell me, with that kind of technology who'd have any use for a starship?
ARCHER: Maybe you will put me out of a job.
DANICA: Dad,
EMORY: Well, I wouldn't worry too much. It's going to take decades to work out all the bugs. But when we do, Starfleet's gonna look a hell of a lot different. That's if it exists at all.
DANICA: You can see he hasn't changed.
ARCHER: I remember you and my father having similar discussions.
EMORY: He believed the future was in the warp drive, I believed in the transporter pad. I miss those talks. I miss him. To Henry,
(They all raise their wine glasses in silent toast.)
T'POL: The Vulcan Science Academy has been studying sub-quantum transporting for some time, with little result.
EMORY: I've been trying to get my hands on some of that research for years. In hindsight, it's probably just as well that I couldn't. Might've sent me down the wrong path.
TUCKER: It's hard to imagine. Beaming someone that far.
EMORY: All breakthroughs are hard to imagine before they happen. When I developed the transporter, most people simply couldn't grasp it. Some still can't.
ARCHER: I have to confess, given a choice, I'd much rather use a good old-fashioned shuttlepod.
EMORY: I'll never forget the protests when the transporter was first approved for bio-matter.
DANICA: Oh, God. Here we go.
EMORY: People said it was unsafe, that it caused brain cancer, psychosis, and even sleep disorders. And then there was all that metaphysical chatter about whether or not the person who arrived after the transport was the same person who left, and not some weird copy.
TUCKER: Which would make all of us copies.
EMORY: I had to fight all of that nonsense, and I'm not going to tell you there weren't costs. I'm living proof of that, but I won. Mankind is better off. Makes everything I've fought for worthwhile.
TUCKER: Here's to a successful experiment.
(This time, Danica does not raise her glass.)

Captain's Log, supplemental. We're entering an area known as the Barrens. There's not a star system within a hundred light years. Perfect conditions for Emory's test.

[Transporter alcove]

(Erickson and Tucker are making modifications to the equipment.)
EMORY: Those early days were pretty terrifying. I'm lucky to be alive.
TUCKER: Is it true you're the first person to go through?
EMORY: I wasn't about to let anyone else do it.
TUCKER: You must've been scared.
EMORY: Terrified. That original transporter took a full minute and a half to cycle through. Felt like a year. You could actually feel yourself being taken apart and put back together. When I materialised, first thing I did was lose my lunch. Second thing I did was get stone drunk. Trick I learned from Zefram Cochrane. Now there was a man who knew the benefits of a little liquid courage. What is it?
TUCKER: Well, you're going to need more juice than I thought.
EMORY: Not more than Enterprise can spare.
TUCKER: Well, we'll have to draw direct from the warp reactor. May even have to shut down a few systems.
EMORY: You'll be able to leave the lights on.
TUCKER: Yeah. if I could get a look at your power converter, it might help me out.
EMORY: I'll tell you what. When I'm done with this, I'll install the converter. See if I can't make life easier on you.
TUCKER: Well, thanks, but when it comes to modifying our systems, I prefer to do things myself. Can I get a look at it?
EMORY: I said I'd install the converter.
TUCKER: And I said, no, thanks.
EMORY: I wish I had time to debate the finer points of engineering protocol, but as you can see I'm extremely busy. And I realise this is your ship and I'm only a guest, but let me remind you that Starfleet has granted me complete access to your systems. If you hadn't noticed, I'm more than capable of handling a little power upgrade. Hand me that, will you?

[Engineering]

DANICA: That's the main reactor and those are the plasma feeds, right?
ARCHER: You know the ship like a member of the crew.
DANICA: I've read just about everything I could find on her. I probably could describe every one of your missions.
ARCHER: Still wonder why you haven't signed on.
DANICA: I think you know the answer.
ARCHER: Your father seems like he can take care of himself. He sure hasn't lost any of his edge.
DANICA: Can't argue with that.
ARCHER: So, why are you still on Earth?
DANICA: He needs me. He still hasn't gotten over Quinn.
ARCHER: It's been fourteen years.
DANICA: Fifteen.
ARCHER: He lost a son. If you leave, he'll lose a daughter.
DANICA: If this test goes well, it'll be a new start for him. Give him something to look forward to. He won't spend all of his time thinking about the past.
ARCHER: And if the test doesn't go well?
DANICA: I don't know.
ARCHER: We both grew up with fathers who could be pretty demanding.
DANICA: That's an understatement.
(they head out into)

[Corridor]

ARCHER: Maybe you should start thinking more about yourself. I know. It's hard taking advice from someone who used to chase you around the backyard with a plastic laser pistol.
DANICA: Yeah, but it's good advice, Jonathan. I just wish I could follow it.

[Erickson's quarters]

EMORY: How was your tour?
DANICA: I enjoyed it.
(She prepares a hypospray and raises his shirt to reveal a very deformed spine.)
EMORY: I can always tell when you're upset. You do this like you're in a hurry.
DANICA: Don't you think there's something to be upset about?
EMORY: We're here. That's reason enough to be optimistic.
DANICA: We're lying to them.
EMORY: We have no choice.
DANICA: We could talk to Jon. He might be able to help us.
EMORY: No. He wouldn't understand. We can't say anything to him. We can't trust anyone.
DANICA: It's Jon.
EMORY: He's a Starfleet captain. His first duty is to his ship.
DANICA: You talk about him like he's an enemy.
EMORY: He's not an enemy. But he's not on our side, either. Believe me.

[Armoury]

(The lights suddenly flicker and go out.)
BURROWS: It's from over there.
REED: No.
(He points somewhere else then hands over a weapon.)
REED: I'll take up. You take down.

[Bridge]

T'POL: It could be a form of spatial distortion.
ARCHER: Can you pinpoint it?
T'POL: F Deck. Near the Armoury.

[Armoury]

(An electric arcing effect is going on as the two men search for the cause. A distorted something hits Burrows, and he screams.)
REED: Sickbay! Crewman down in the Armoury!
(He rushes to Burrows, turns him over and sees that half his face is now a squidgy mess.)

[Transporter alcove]

T'POL: He suffered massive cellular disruption, as if he'd been subjected to intense delta radiation.
DANICA: Did other crewmen see anything?
ARCHER: The lights were malfunctioning.
EMORY: This anomaly you detected, you think it was somehow responsible?
ARCHER: It showed up at the same time, in the same location. Can't have been a coincidence.
EMORY: I sympathise, believe me. During the initial tests for the transporter, some brave men and women were lost. Not a day goes by that I don't think about them. How can I help?
T'POL: You've spent a great deal of time in this region of space.
EMORY: I never encountered anything like this.
T'POL: Are you sure?
EMORY: There's a reason this is called the Barrens, Captain. There's nothing out here.
ARCHER: Something out here killed one of my crewmen.
EMORY: I wish I had an explanation for you. (shifts in discomfort)
ARCHER: What is it?
EMORY: Time for my treatment. Dani? Sorry. (as she wheels him away) Can we continue this later?
ARCHER: Of course.

[Erickson's quarters]

EMORY: Calm down.
DANICA: You never said that anything like this would happen.
EMORY: I didn't know this would happen.
DANICA: Dad, a man is dead, and we're responsible. I'm not going to go along with this anymore.
EMORY: Listen to me,
DANICA: No, no. We've got to tell them the truth!
EMORY: Dani, you're condemning him to death.
DANICA: I'm condemning him? How do you know he isn't already dead?
EMORY: He's alive.
DANICA: Dad, Jonathan's practically family. He and Quinn were best friends.
EMORY: I know. I know that.
DANICA: We can't do this to him, to his crew.
EMORY: We're almost ready for our first test.
DANICA: Someone else could die before then.
EMORY: The odds of that happening again are extremely small. No one's going to die. I just need a couple of days. We owe him that much, Dani.
DANICA: I wonder what he would have to say about all this. About what we're doing.
EMORY: When we're done, you can ask him.

[Transporter alcove]

TUCKER: Routing power. (the lights dim and go up again on the Bridge) Ready.
EMORY: Help me up.
TUCKER: Sir?
EMORY: Give me a hand, please.
(Tucker helps him stand at the control console.)
EMORY:  This part I like doing myself. Energising.
(A contraption is beamed away.)

[Bridge]

T'POL: The probe materialised at the target coordinates.
ARCHER: (into comm.) Looks like it arrived in good condition.
T'POL: Captain, we're receiving telemetry.

[Transporter alcove]

ARCHER [OC]: We're already getting back data. Congratulations, Emory.
TUCKER: Forty thousand kilometres. Nothings ever gone that far.
EMORY: It's a start.
TUCKER: It's going to take a few hours to gather all the telemetry. Let's celebrate in Mess Hall. My treat.
EMORY: I like to monitor the data as it comes in. I'm sort of obsessive that way.
TUCKER: Well, then let me bring something back for you. Help pass the time between data streams.
EMORY: No, thanks.
TUCKER: It's been a long day. You must be starving.
EMORY: You go ahead. I'll join you later.
TUCKER: You sure you don't want a second pair of eyes?
EMORY: One pair will do. And no offence, Commander, but I work much better when I'm not being distracted.
TUCKER: You know where to find me.

[Archer's quarters]

ARCHER: Come in.
TUCKER: Something's wrong. Most of the work Emory had me do, tapping into the warp reactor for extra power, re-routing the plasma flow. It wasn't necessary for the test.
ARCHER: What are you saying?
TUCKER: Remember when the lights dimmed?
ARCHER: Yeah.
TUCKER: Well, he channeled that energy into a feedback loop. It wasn't going into the beam.
ARCHER: Maybe he needs the power for another phase of the experiment.
TUCKER: Well, from what I can tell, his sub-quantum version should use less energy than a regular transporter. That's one of the reasons it's so brilliant. Either he was keeping me busy, making sure I was looking the other way, or this sub-quantum thing is a smoke screen for something else. Something he hasn't told us about. I wouldn't have picked up on any of it if you hadn't asked me to take a closer look.
ARCHER: When I asked Emory about the anomaly that killed Burrows, he claimed he'd never heard of anything like it.
TUCKER: Not true?
ARCHER: Something very similar appeared on Emory's research ship five years ago. T'Pol dug up the report from Starfleet's data banks. A crew member saw it. Said it seemed to be alive.
T'POL [OC]: Bridge to Captain Archer.
ARCHER: Go ahead.
T'POL [OC]: We're picking up another one.

[Bridge]

T'POL: It's on C deck, section five.
ARCHER [OC]: On my way.

[C deck, section 5]

(With weapons at the ready, the Captain and a pair of MACOs join T'Pol where the lights are flickering.)
T'POL: It's fluctuating.
ARCHER: What's your best guess?
T'POL: I've lost it.
ARCHER: (to the MACOs) Take section three. Take section four. Don't let it touch you.
T'POL: This way. It should be here.
(The weird phenomenon appears behind them.)
T'POL: It's highly unstable, surrounded by a subspace field.
(It passes between them, just touching T'Pol, who collapses in agony.)

[Sickbay]

(Phlox treats the back of T'Pol's hand.)
PHLOX: You're fortunate you didn't have more prolonged contact.
(He refers to her scanner.)
PHLOX: Can you put that down for thirty seconds?
T'POL: I took visual readings.
(Tucker transfers the data to the main Sickbay monitor.)
ARCHER: Can you slow it down?
(The image starts to look humanoid.)
ARCHER: Hold it. Enhance. A little more.
(A recognisably human face appears and Archer goes pensive.)
TUCKER: Who is it?
ARCHER: It's Quinn. Emory's son.

[Erickson's quarters]

(Looking at the image on the desk monitor.)
EMORY: That's incredible. He hasn't aged a day.
ARCHER: Emory?
EMORY: I'm not here to test a new transporter. I'm here to bring back my son.
ARCHER: What are you talking about?
EMORY: We were conducting first trials. My greatest achievement. Quinn wanted to be the first to go through. He was a lot like his old man. A lot like you. I lost his signal and couldn't get it back. Truth is, the sub-quantum transporter is a fundamentally flawed concept. It'll never work. Not now, not a thousand years from now. I suppose I knew that at the time.
ARCHER: You let him go through with the test?
EMORY: I was a relatively young man who had created something that changed Starfleet. After an achievement of that magnitude, there was nowhere to go but down. My life became just one long struggle to recapture past glory.
ARCHER: I'm not talking about you. I'm talking about Quinn.
EMORY: I wasn't thinking of the consequences.
ARCHER: You said you came here to get him back?
EMORY: This region, the Barrens, is actually a subspace node, a bubble of curved space-time. It's why there are no stars. Quinn's transporter signal is trapped here. At certain intervals, there are fluctuations in the node that cause the signal to reappear. If we can lock onto it at one of those intervals we can save him.
ARCHER: You could've told me all of this before.
EMORY: Starfleet would never have authorised the mission. I had to create an excuse.
ARCHER: A member of my crew is dead.
EMORY: I didn't know that the manifestations would be dangerous, believe me.
ARCHER: You want me to believe you?
EMORY: I want you to help me. Quinn was like a brother to you.
ARCHER: You were like my second father. You should've trusted me.
EMORY: All I need is one more scan. I can bring him back.
ARCHER: Is that the truth?
EMORY: I'm not lying.
ARCHER: You've been lying to me since you came aboard.
EMORY: I had no choice! I'm sorry. Please help me, Jonathan. Help me save my son. Please.

[Ready room]

ARCHER: I want you both to work with Emory, give him whatever help he needs. What is it, Trip?
TUCKER: I can't believe I'm hearing this. We've already lost one man.
ARCHER: It won't happen again. We'll alert the crew to the danger.
TUCKER: If they'd been alerted twenty four hours ago, Burrows might be alive.
T'POL: We don't fully understand the nature of these manifestations. They could pose other dangers.
ARCHER: I know there's a risk. We're talking one more day. That's all Emory needs.
T'POL: What he claims he needs.
ARCHER: I believe him.
T'POL: Because he's a friend of the family?
ARCHER: That's not why I'm doing this.
TUCKER: Why are you doing this?
ARCHER: Quinn's signal is getting weaker, Trip. It's been decaying for the past fifteen years. Emory says if we don't do something now, we'll never get him back in one piece. We have a responsibility to help.
TUCKER: What about Emory's responsibility? He lied to get us out here.
ARCHER: I'm aware of that. But we're here. We can't just turn the ship around and leave a man to die. You have your orders. I suggest you get started.

[Transporter alcove]

TUCKER: We're still getting a spike in the array. I could swap out the emitter coils with something from Engineering. Might even out a bit.
EMORY: Sounds good.
TUCKER: I'll get on it.
EMORY: I know you don't approve of what I've done.
TUCKER: You need my approval?
EMORY: I'm disappointed that you think less of me.
TUCKER: You liked me better when I worshipped your shadow?
EMORY: Yes. It's an honest answer.
TUCKER: I'd think you'd be out of practice.
EMORY: You may want to reserve judgment on my actions until you've lost a son.
TUCKER: I have lost someone close, and I'd do almost anything to get her back. Except put other people in danger.
EMORY: Quinn and I used to argue all the time. Wasn't until I lost him that I realised that those arguments were some of the happiest moments of my life.
TUCKER: I'll be in Engineering.

[Archer's quarters]

DANICA: Can I come in? Hey there. You must be Porthos. I've heard a lot about you. (moves to stroke him and the little dog immediately presents his tummy for scratching) He's got a lot of personality.
ARCHER: And an appetite to match.
DANICA: I wanted to say that I'm sorry. I should've come to you earlier. I feel responsible. You lost a crewman.
ARCHER: We can't change what's happened. Maybe some good can come out of it.
DANICA: You think we can get him back?
EMORY: I think that it's possible. That's enough reason for me to try.
DANICA: I wonder what it must be like for him, you know? Is he in pain? Is he conscious? If he is, does he think that we've forgotten about him? Quinn was everything to my father. To both of us. Getting him back is all that we've thought about for the past fifteen years.
ARCHER: Let's hope when this is over, you'll have something else to think about.

[Engineering]

T'POL: The power conversion tables. Some of these modifications should help.
TUCKER: Thanks.
T'POL: Is there anything else?
TUCKER: No, I think we're pretty much there. (she turns to go) I'm trying to decide what to show for movie night.
T'POL: Movie night?
TUCKER: Yeah, I thought I'd fire up the old tradition. You in the mood for a horror film or a musical?
T'POL: I don't think I'll have the time for either.
TUCKER: You can't spend every second of your life studying that, whatever it's called.
T'POL: Kir'Shara.
TUCKER: You got to take a break eventually.
T'POL: Eventually.
TUCKER: I don't get you, T'Pol. I thought you joined Starfleet so you could interact a little more with humans. But it seems to me that ever since we left spacedock, you spend all your free time cooped up in your room reading that bible of yours.
T'POL: I may have found new priorities.
TUCKER: What's that supposed to mean?
T'POL: I'm needed on the Bridge.

[Launch bay]

(Archer has wheeled Emory down to see the shuttlepods.)
T'POL [OC]: T'Pol to Captain Archer.
ARCHER: Archer.

[Bridge]

T'POL: I picked up something that was in your area, but I've lost it.

[Launch bay]

ARCHER: Keep monitoring.
EMORY: (with a scanner) He's here.
(The lights flicker and the electric crackling starts.)
EMORY: Jonathan. There.
(The 'figure' walks out of the shuttlepod nose.)
EMORY: Quinn? Quinn?
(It walks through a wall panel, setting off an explosion. Archer gets to Emory just in time to protect him.)

[Corridor]

TUCKER: It knocked out an EPS junction. Repair's going to take a couple of hours.
ARCHER: Will it affect the transporter?
TUCKER: No. I can't believe you're still going through with this.
ARCHER: We're not going to have this argument again.
TUCKER: That thing barely missed a stack of torpedoes. If it had jumped two feet to the left we wouldn't be here to talk about it. We should concentrate on repairing the ship so we can get out of here.
ARCHER: If we beam Quinn aboard there won't be any more of these manifestations.
TUCKER: How the hell do you know?
ARCHER: Trip.
TUCKER: You're putting your personal feelings before the safety of this ship.
ARCHER: And you are this close to insubordination.
TUCKER: Insubordination?
ARCHER: I've made a decision. It's the right decision, and the discussion is over. Can you accept that? Now go do your job.
TUCKER: Yes, sir.

[Erickson's quarters]

EMORY: I got what I needed. You should be able to get a good lock when he reappears.
ARCHER: When will that be?
EMORY: Just over three hours. How's your ship?
ARCHER: We're ready.
EMORY: You saved my life
ARCHER: Forget it.
EMORY: You didn't deserve any of this, Jonathan. I'm sorry this became your problem.
ARCHER: Let's make it worthwhile. Let's get Quinn back.
EMORY: I'm scared.
ARCHER: I don't blame you.
EMORY: I've waited so long for this moment. Planned for it. What if something goes wrong? What if I fail?
ARCHER: On the day before I entered flight training, I asked my father pretty much the same thing.
EMORY: What did he say?
ARCHER: Don't fail.
EMORY: Henry never was a poet.
ARCHER: He didn't need to be.

[Transporter alcove]

EMORY: Any moment now.
ARCHER: T'Pol.

[Bridge]

T'POL: Nothing.

[Transporter alcove]

T'POL [OC]: Captain.
ARCHER: Go ahead.

[Bridge]

T'POL: B deck, section eight.

[Transporter alcove]

EMORY: Confinement beam. Widest possible spread.
TUCKER: Way ahead of you. Got a lock on something. Pattern's good
EMORY: Let me.
(He heaves himself out of his wheelchair.)
EMORY: Energising.
(The energy figure starts to appear.)
EMORY: We need more power.
TUCKER: That's all we got.
EMORY: It's working.
(The figure moves, arms reach out, and the face is briefly recognisable.)
DANICA: Quinn.
EMORY: (losing him) No. No.
(Phlox scans the figure.)
EMORY: Complete the transport sequence.
TUCKER: I don't have a strong enough signal.
EMORY: Recalibrate the confinement beam.
TUCKER: That won't help get us a lock.
EMORY: Just do it.
PHLOX: I'm reading massive cellular deterioration.
EMORY: That's not possible.
PHLOX: He's losing cohesion. If he materialises, he'll die in seconds.
EMORY: I can reverse the damage by cross-phasing the stream.
TUCKER: The transporter can't do that.
EMORY: I built the damn thing!
PHLOX: I'm losing his vital signs.
ARCHER: Emory,
EMORY: Get away from me. Tie in the secondary buffers.
TUCKER: There's not enough time.
DANICA: Dad.
EMORY: I can hold the pattern. Just do it!
DANICA: Dad, let him go.
EMORY: No!
PHLOX: There's nothing you can do for him.
EMORY: I can't let him go. I can't!
ARCHER: Emory, you can't save him.
EMORY: I'm sorry, Quinn.
(He materialises a young man in a brown boiler suit, who collapses to the floor. Emory manages to go over and sit beside him, cradling his head.)
EMORY: Oh, Quinn.
QUINN: Dad? What's wrong?
EMORY: Quinn, please forgive me, please.
QUINN: What is it? What?
(Emory closes his dead son's eyes, and cries.)

[Erickson's quarters]

EMORY: Come in.
(Archer enters.)
EMORY: I couldn't leave him like that. It's better to be alive or dead, not somewhere in between.
ARCHER: If it means anything, my guess is Quinn would feel the same way.
EMORY: I came here to bring my son home. I suppose I accomplished my goal.
ARCHER: I've been in contact with Starfleet.
EMORY: I imagine they're not too happy with all of this.
ARCHER: I'm sure they'll take your achievements into consideration.
EMORY: I perpetrated a fraud to obtain the use of your ship. A member of your crew is dead. There's no way I'm going to avoid the consequences. There's one good thing to come out of this. Dani won't have to worry about taking care of me anymore. I managed to let go of one of my children. Now I guess it's time for me to let go of the other one.
ARCHER: I always thought she should be out here. 
EMORY: Maybe they'll put me somewhere where I'll be useful. Get a chance to teach.
ARCHER: You'd probably be good at it.
EMORY: I wouldn't be boring. Why settle for making myself miserable when I can spread the misery around to an entire class of students?

[Sickbay]

PHLOX: Your neurolytic enzymes are at the same level they were a week ago. No sign of Pa'Nar Syndrome.
T'POL: It's still difficult for me to accept.
PHLOX: You were diagnosed with an incurable disease. Now it's gone. It's a big adjustment. From what I've been reading, similar diagnoses are taking place all over Vulcan. People with Pa'Nar are coming forward. It's no longer a stigma.
T'POL: The Kir'Shara is having an enormous impact.
PHLOX: It's clearly had an impact on you. You seem more certain of yourself.
T'POL: I've never felt less certain.
PHLOX: You're re-examining your core beliefs. Something most people never do.

[Engineering]

T'POL: Do you have a moment?
TUCKER: Sure. Something tells me you're not here to talk about movie night.
T'POL: I'm going through something that's very complicated.
TUCKER: I know.
T'POL: I'm learning, it seems for the first time what it truly means to be Vulcan.
TUCKER: Well, maybe you can fill me in.
T'POL: Not until I understand it myself. I don't think there'll be time for (pauses)
TUCKER: What do you want me to say?
T'POL: That you understand.
TUCKER: I do. It's not like I didn't know this was coming. (as she turns away) At least my warp engines still need me.

Captain's log, supplemental. We've rendezvoused with the Sarajevo, which will be returning Emory and Danica to Earth.

[Transporter alcove]

(T'Pol and Phlox are also present.)
ARCHER: Safe journey.
EMORY: And you, Jonathan. Commander.
(They shake hands.)
EMORY: An honour working with you. Some suggestions. This might boost your transporter range a few hundred kilometres.
(He hands over a PADD.)
EMORY: Couldn't resist.
TUCKER: I'll check it out.
DANICA: Say good-bye to Porthos.
ARCHER: Good luck.
DANICA: Maybe I'll see you around.
(Tucker beams the Father of the Transporter, and his daughter, away, then the group go back to their normal duties.)

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