Out Of Time

Original Airdate: 17 Dec, 2006

[Airfield]

(The Torchwood team are waiting for a small biplane to land. Sky Gipsy makes it down safely and taxis to a halt next to them. The pilot is a woman with bright red lipstick.)
DIANE: Hello there. Apologies for the unplanned touchdown. Just hit some rotten turbulence.
JACK: Captain Jack Harkness.
(Her two passengers disembark.)
DIANE: Diane Holmes, pilot. Is this some sort of secret base? You must show me round one day, Captain.
JOHN: Everything all right?
EMMA: How long before we head off again? My uncle's expecting me.
JACK: When did you leave?
DIANE: About half an hour ago.
JACK: Which date?
DIANE: Today, December the 18th.
JACK: Which year? Which year? Which year? I need to know.
DIANE: 1953.

[Hub]

JACK: There's no need to be frightened.
JOHN: Who are you exactly?
JACK: The least you know about us, the better. Meet the team.
TOSH: Toshiko.
GWEN: Gwen.
OWEN: Doctor Owen Harper.
JOHN: John Ellis.
EMMA: Emma Louise Cowell.
DIANE: Diane Holmes.
OWEN: Please, follow me.
(The three new arrivals follow Owen upstairs.)
GWEN: At least it wasn't a spaceship full of aliens.
JACK: That might have been easier.

[Conference room]

JOHN: But how can you travel fifty years in half an hour?
JACK: Your aircraft slipped through a transcendental portal.
EMMA: A what?
JACK: A door in time and space.
JOHN: It's some kind of trick. It has to be.
JACK: Tosh?
(Tosh has put out some prints on the table.)
TOSH: Celebrations of the Millennium in your respective home cities, photographs documenting the development of Cardiff Bay from the Fifties to the present day, blueprints of modern day aeroplanes.
DIANE: But if all this is true then how do we get back?
JACK: You don't. According to history, your plane never returned. I'm sorry.
DIANE: What's going to happen to us?
JOHN: Never mind about us. What happened to everyone else? Our families.

[Hub]

(Gwen has Emma's file.)
GWEN: Your father died in 1959. He was forty eight.
EMMA: Dad said he'd die young. All the men in the munitions factory did.
GWEN: Your mother lived till she was eighty one, though. I know this is hard to take in, but is there anyone else?
(John is with Tosh and her computer.)
JOHN: My son, Alan Ellis. He was born on the sixth of April, 1937. 14 Park Place, Grangetown. He might still be alive.
TOSH: The archives in the fifties weren't that well documented.
JACK: We'll try again tomorrow. Right now, you need to get some sleep.
(And Diane is with Owen. She is a cigarette smoker.)
OWEN: Friends? Boyfriend?
DIANE: Not really. Never stayed in one place long enough.

[Hostel]

GWEN: It's a bit basic.
DIANE: Not when you've slept in barracks.
(The girls are sharing a room with one bed and a pair of bunks.)

[John's room]

JOHN: I was going to close a deal on a shop in Dublin tomorrow.
JACK: What do you trade in?
JOHN: Food, knick-knacks, essentials.
(John has a portable radio, and he tries to tune it in.)
JACK: What are you after?
JOHN: Bit of music.
(Jack finds Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata on a local MW frequency. John also has a camera.)
JOHN: There's photographs of my family in here.
JACK: I'll see what I can do.
JOHN: Don't worry, Captain Harkness. I'll look after the ladies.
JACK: Call me Jack.

[Girl's room]

(Female laughter and a door closing.)
EMMA: Who else is here?
GWEN: A couple of young girls. Pretty dress.
EMMA: Thank you. I made it myself.
GWEN: Where are you from?
EMMA: Bristol.
GWEN: What were you going to Dublin for?
EMMA: Auntie Nora's ill and Uncle Finn can't manage the children. It'll be good practice for when I have children of my own, Mum says.
(Emma takes a teddy out of her suitcase and hugs it.)
EMMA: She's gone next door so Uncle Finn can telephone. She'll know I'm missing by now.
GWEN: Emma, she found out in 1953. Over fifty years have passed, remember?
EMMA: What will she think happened? It must have been like one of those murders where they never find the body.
GWEN: They seemed to think the plane went down in the sea.

[Hub]

(Gwen hands out passports.)
JACK: These will be your means of identification for the authorities. We've set up bank accounts for you but we'll give you an allowance so you can practice with the currency and money management.
JOHN: David Ward?
DIANE: Sally-Anne Hope.
EMMA: Deborah Morrison. And it's spelt how Deborah Kerr spells it.
JACK: Your background stories should incorporate the skills you already have. For instance, John, you could have run a corner shop.
JOHN: No.
JACK: We can fake references.
JOHN: You can't take away our names. For God's sake, man, it's all we've got left. It's my son's name. It's the name above my shop.
JACK: You're right. I didn't think. You should keep your name.

[Outside the supermarket]

IANTO: I'd suggest you use twenty five pounds for your food and then twenty pounds for luxuries like cigarettes, magazines.
EMMA: My dad only made ten pounds a week.
IANTO: Things are a lot more expensive now.
(The doors open for them.)
DIANE: How did it do that?
IANTO: It's automatic. It knows you're there.
DIANE: But how?
IANTO: There are wave bouncing detectors which emit radio waves and then look for reflections
DIANE: Bananas!
IANTO: Of course, bananas are far more interesting.

[Supermarket]

JOHN: Look at all this. We'd just come off rationing in '53.
IANTO: Yeah, sorry. We are a consumer society.
JOHN: It's bloody fantastic.
(Diane is fascinated by the televisions)
EMMA: How much food money have I got left?
IANTO: Fifteen pound forty.
(Emma grabs lots of chocolate.)
IANTO: Twelve pounds ten. You'll ruin your teeth.
EMMA: You sound like my mum.
(They meet Diane by the classic DVDs.)
DIANE: They sell films in boxes and you can watch them at home.
EMMA: I love going to the pictures.
(Meanwhile, John is horrified by the cover of Peach magazine, amongst others.)
JOHN: Good God.
IANTO: Welcome to the wonderful world of scantily-dressed celebrities.
EMMA: Super Excel Waterproof Luscious Lashes Mascara. I've got to have that.
JOHN: There's children around.
IANTO: She's a children's TV presenter.
(At the checkout.)
IANTO: So you like the musicals?
EMMA: My best friend Kate, and I saw Calamity Jane five times. I've got the LP.
IANTO: You all right?
(Diane holds up her new cigarettes with the warning Smoking Kills.)
DIANE: What does that mean?

[Outside the Millennium Stadium]

JOHN: I'm just going to take a look at the stadium. You girls stick together now. I'll be back for supper.
(Ianto drives away with Diane and Emma. Alan consults a map and walks away.)

[Street]

(John is standing outside the last remaining house of a terrace, and it is boarded up.)
JOHN: Excuse me. Do you know a man called Alan Ellis? He used to live here.
MAN: No, sorry, mate.

[Hostel kitchen]

(Emma is opening the teabags and putting the leaves into a teapot.)
DIANE: I'm going to check on the plane this afternoon. Want to come?
EMMA: I'm going to watch this. And maybe make some paper chains.
DIANE: Wonder what work I can get in aviation.
EMMA: I'm going to have to find a husband.
(The other two residents enter, laughing. One grabs a couple of mugs.)
ALESHA: All right? I'm Alesha, this is Jade.
JADE: All right.
EMMA: I'm Emma.
DIANE: Diane. Excuse me, I have to get ready.
(She stares at Alesha dropping the teabags into the mugs before pouring boiling water on them.)
ALESHA: Where d'you get those shoes? They're lush.
EMMA: Thanks.

[Hangar]

DIANE: Hello, old girl. Do you miss me?
OWEN: I've er, I've been reading up on you. England to Australia in four days in 1952. That is impressive.
DIANE: Yeah, terrible wind across the Bengal Bay.
OWEN: Something you ate?
(Diane checks the oil level in the plane's engine.)
OWEN: So, how did you get into this?
DIANE: Ferried planes during the war. Of course, when it was over, we were supposed to revert to being dutiful wives and daughters. But I'd got a taste for it. No pig-headed man tells me what to do.
OWEN: Ah. Sky Gipsy?
DIANE: After the engine. The de Havilland Gipsy Six. A work of genius. Tuned with a higher compression ratio so it can squeeze far more energy from its air fuel mixture. Can I take her up?
OWNE: No. You could get arrested. You haven't got a licence.
DIANE: But I. Oh, bugger. It's no longer valid.
OWEN: I guess I'm just another pig-headed man telling you what to do.
DIANE: Well, you'd better make it up to me. I want to learn all about this new world.

[Pub]

(John is filling his pipe whist talking to Jack.)
JOHN: Blackpool were 3-1 down, then Stanley Matthews worked his magic. Scored two goals in the last 20 minutes. Bolton lost 4-3. My boy was on his knees, punching the air. The FA cup final live in my own living room. I charged the lads a shilling each to come and watch.
JACK: Ever the business man, eh, John?
JOHN: That's an American accent, isn't it?
JACK: That's right.
JOHN: So how did you end up here, doing whatever it is that you do?
JACK: It's a long story.
JOHN: I'm a slow drinker. You know everything about me. What's the problem?
JACK: It gets kinda complicated.
JOHN: What, did you fall through time too?
JACK: Yeah, you could say that.
BARMAN: Sorry, mate, you can't smoke in here.

[Hostel lounge]

(Putting up paper chains.)
EMMA: What are you doing Christmas Eve? We could go carol singing.
(Aletha and Jade find that hilarious.)
JADE: Sorry, love, I'll be getting hammered.
EMMA: Where are your families?
JADE: No idea.
ALESHA: We grew up in care.
EMMA: Like a children's home? I haven't got anyone else either.
JADE: What happened to you?
EMMA: My parents are dead, so I came down here to start afresh.
ALESHA: So they didn't leave you a house or anything?
EMMA: No. I've got nothing.
ALESHA: Were you close to them?
EMMA: Yes. I loved them very much.
(Jade gives Emma a can of drink.)

[Pub]

(Putting their coats on.)
JOHN: Must have been an awful Christmas for them, thinking I'd drowned. I just want to know what kind of life he had, my son. He might have kids. I could be passing my own flesh and blood in the street. Find him, Jack. He's all I've got left.

[Restaurant]

(The waitress shows Owen and Diane to their seats then leaves.)
OWEN: Cheers.
(Owen sits down, Diane remains standing.)
OWEN: What?
DIANE: I'm waiting for you to pull out my chair.
OWEN: Let me get this straight. You expect equality and chivalry?
DIANE: I don't see why they should be mutually exclusive.
OWEN: Well, if it makes you happy. Your chair, ma'am.
(Owen does the honours.)
DIANE: Thank you.
(He also lights her cigarette.)
DIANE: So what other strides have women made?
OWEN: Well, on the strange but true, how about this. You don't have to have sex to have kids any more.
DIANE: What? How come?
OWEN: Get yourself inseminated with a sort of syringe. Cheery little process. Seriously, men donate sperm anonymously. A little shuffle into a pot at a sperm bank. And they say romance is dead.
DIANE: Oh, come on, I wasn't born yesterday.
OWEN: No, but for a bird who's going on ninety, you look pretty hot.

[Hostel lounge]

EMMA: What was your favourite song?
JADE: Well, it's hard to say.
EMMA: I know what mine was. (sings) I just blew in from the windy city. The windy city is mighty pretty, but they ain't got what we got, I'm tellin' ya, boys!
(John walks in.)
JOHN: What do you think you're playing at? I thought I could trust you to behave.

[Restaurant]

(After the meal.)
OWEN: Where do you want to go now?
DIANE: Well, I'm in your hands.
OWEN: Well, we could go back to mine. You could read up about yourself on the net. That sounds like a line. It's not a line, I'm not chatting you up. Not because I don't think you're attractive, because you are, but because I wouldn't want you to think that I was taking advantage of you.
DIANE: Got any Scotch?

[Hostel dining room]

(John has laid out a table for two.)
JOHN: I don't see why she got you involved.
GWEN: She was upset.
JOHN: She was drinking.
EMMA: I only had half a glass.
JOHN: Enough to make a show of yourself. We're not meant to draw attention to ourselves. We're not the same as them. We can't trust anyone.
GWEN: Will you be okay now, Emma?
JOHN: Don't worry, I won't let her out of my sight again.
(John puts the plates of food on the table.)
EMMA: I don't like liver.
JOHN: Sit down, young lady, and be grateful for what you're given.
EMMA: And why should I listen to you?
GWEN: Emma.
EMMA: Only my dad gets to talk to me like that, and I'm never going to see him again, am I? Or my mum, or my best friend, or my dog. And I miss them. And I hate this filthy, stinking place!
(Emma leaves.)
JOHN: I never had this sort of trouble with my son.

[Owen's apartment]

(Trying to push magazines under the sofa.)
OWEN: Woman have been to space too, you know. You've got a lot of catching up to do.
DIANE: Do you have a girlfriend?
OWEN: No.
DIANE: So who do all those beauty products belong to?
OWEN: Me, actually.
DIANE: No.
OWEN: Oi, real men can moisturise too, you know.
DIANE: It's not very homely here.
OWEN: No, I'm not here that much. It doesn't seem worth the effort. You smoke too much.
(Owen's choice of mood music is Saved By A Woman by Ray LaMontagne.)
DIANE: So I gather. Amelia Earhart. She disappeared in 1932. Do you think she's still out there somewhere?
OWEN: No, I doubt it. One in a zillion chance, you ending up here.
DIANE: A whole new world.
OWEN: Oh, it's not so bad, once you get used to it. I reckon you'll fit in just fine.
DIANE: I'm glad you haven't got a girlfriend.
OWEN: Me too.
(Meanwhile, Emma is now sleeping on Gwen's sofa.
Owen rolls off Diane after finishing the deed.)
OWEN: I take it that wasn't your first time.
DIANE: I had a lover. He was married.
OWEN: And you didn't care?
DIANE: Well, I was free to do what I liked and I didn't have to cook and clean for him. It suited me. I'm not exactly marriage material.
OWEN: Yeah. I always thought the fifties were uptight, sexually repressed, you know.
DIANE: You didn't invent it, you know.
OWEN: Oh? Can we do it again?
DIANE: Don't see why not.
OWEN: We could have an affair. We could be fuck buddies.
DIANE: What's a fuck buddy?
OWEN: It's, er, it's a friend that you have casual sex with.
DIANE: There's nothing casual about what we just did.
OWEN: Oh, no, no, I didn't mean that.
DIANE: Sex shouldn't be devalued. Both parties should give it one hundred percent concentration. Because when you take off together it's the next best thing to flying.

[Gwen's home]

(Emma wakes to the sight of Rhys' naked behind. She screams. A little later, with him in a dressing gown, Gwen has joined them.)
GWEN: Emma is my auntie's step-daughter. She was meant to spend Christmas in Cardiff with a friend but they had this awful argument last night, and er, she rang me. Got my number from Mum. The thing is, she doesn't really want to go back home so I thought, I thought maybe she could stay with us. We've got a lot to catch up on.
RHYS: For Christmas?
GWEN: (silent) What was I supposed to say? Come on.
RHYS: I'd better get a bigger turkey.
EMMA: Thanks.
GWEN: This is Rhys, my long-suffering boyfriend. He lives here.
EMMA: Don't your parents mind?
GWEN: Emma's parents are a bit religious.
RHYS: Oh, er, better not tell them you saw my morning glory then, eh?
(Rhys leaves.)
GWEN: The thing is I couldn't tell him your parents were dead. He'd ask too many questions. The thing is, he doesn't know exactly what I do.

[Hub]

GWEN: We can't expect John and Diane to look after her. I mean, they're complete strangers. I had to take her in. Diane didn't even come home last night.
OWEN: Er, I think she was in a B&B. I'm going to take her job-hunting later, if that's all right.
TOSH: Jack. John's son. I think I've found him.

[Nursing home]

NURSE: Come and meet Alan, though I'm not sure how much help he'll be to you.
(Alan is an old man sitting in a chair, staring at nothing.)
NURSE: Alan, there's someone here to see you. He's a nephew on your father's side. He's been tracking down the family history.
ALAN: Is Sally coming?
NURSE: Sally's his wife. She passed away a while back. Sorry, this isn't one of his better days.
JOHN: What's wrong with him?
NURSE: Alzheimer's.
JOHN: What's that?
NURSE: He's senile. He doesn't remember who he is most of the time. Couldn't live at home any more. He'd leave hobs on, forget to dress, you know. He never had any children so there was no one there to look after him.
(The photographs have been developed and printed.)
JOHN: That's you and your dad playing footie out the back. That's your dad and your mum and your new television set.
ALAN: When can I go home?
NURSE: You're not well enough, love.
ALAN: I don't like it here. They took my clothes.
NURSE: I'll have a word. They're probably in the wash. Keeps me going, this one.
ALAN: What did he do for a living? Was he in retail?
NURSE: I think he was a fireman.
ALAN: That's what I did. In the war.

[Airfield]

DIANE: Sixty pounds for half an hour!
OWEN: No worries. I'll pay.
DIANE: A Cessna! Oh, it's my first plane. I bought one after the war. They've hardly changed. Dream to fly.
OWEN: We'll soon get you back behind the throttle.
DIANE: Thanks, Owen.

[Nursing home]

JOHN: Matthews did three set-ups in twenty minutes, then Bill Perry cracked home the winner. You said he had wings on his feet and that's why he was called a winger. You used to say clever things like that.
ALAN: Blackpool won.
JOHN: Yes! Alan, it's me, your dad. I bought you that football annual you wanted for Christmas, Alan. It was in my desk drawer. Alan, please.
(But Alan has drifted off again.)
NURSE: Everything all right?
JOHN: He remembered who won the FA Cup final when he was a boy.
NURSE: He sometimes remembers snippets from his childhood. It's quite common with dementia.
ALAN: When's Dad coming, Mum?
NURSE: I'm not your mum, love.
JOHN: Alan.
ALAN: Who are you?

[Hub]

JACK: John's witnessing the end of his world, the end of his line. And we can't help. There's no puzzle to solve, no enemy to fight. Just three lost people who have somehow become our responsibility.

[Airfield]

INSTRUCTOR: Best I can do is Friday the twenty ninth, three o'clock.
OWEN: Can't you take her up today?
INSTRUCTOR: Fully booked.
DIANE: It's all right, I've flown for years. I can go up on my own.
INSTRUCTOR: Not without a licence, sorry.
OWEN: Maybe you could cancel someone? We'll pay extra.
INSTRUCTOR: I couldn't do that do my regulars, now could I?
DIANE: Look, it's fine. Book me in for the twenty ninth. It's Diane Holmes.
OWEN: Diane, I'm really sorry. I should have called ahead.
DIANE: Oh, for goodness sake, this is so silly. It's just I was really looking forward. Ignore me. Let's get out of here.

[Party]

(The music is I See You Baby by Groove Armada. A man approaches Emma.)
GWEN: Do you think she'll be all right though? I don't think she's even had a proper boyfriend.
RHYS: Oh Gwen, stop fussing. She'll be fine, man.
(Gwen kisses Rhys.)
RHYS: What was that for?
GWEN: For putting up with me.
RHYS: I deserve a lot more for doing that.
(The man leads Emma away. Gwen and Rhys find them later in a quiet corner. Gwen pulls the man off.)
GWEN: Oi! Hands off.
RHYS: Go back to your friends, there's a good boy.
GWEN: What are you playing at?
EMMA: I wasn't going to let him do anything.
GWEN: You might not have had much choice.
RHYS: Come on, Gwen, don't you think you're over-reacting.
EMMA: I was just having a kiss and a cuddle.
GWEN: He was after a lot more than that.

[Gwen's home]

(Looking at a Miss B magazine.)
EMMA: This is disgusting.
GWEN: I just want you to know that people are more sexually aware these days. Then maybe you'll be more careful.
EMMA: Mum said that no man wants to marry soiled goods.
GWEN: Attitudes have changed. As long as it's safe and between two consenting adults, no one cares.
EMMA: So, how many men have you done it with?
GWEN: A few.
EMMA: Were you in love with all of them?
GWEN: No. Sex can just be about having a good time together. If you're in the right mood, with the right guy, it's the best. No big deal.
EMMA: So if I meet a boy and we get on, and he wants sex, then you think I should let him.
GWEN: No. No, that's not what I said.
EMMA: What are you saying?
GWEN: Sex is nothing to be ashamed of. And as for you, well, your first time should be with someone special.
EMMA: Do you wish you'd waited for Rhys? He's your special someone, isn't he?
GWEN: Yes. Yes, I suppose.
EMMA: And I bet the sex with him is better than with the others.
GWEN: Well.
EMMA: I will wait for Mister Right, I think. I'm really not the kind of girl who sleeps around. I'm going to brush my teeth. Thanks for the chat.
GWEN: Not a problem.

[Owen's apartment]

(Diane is trying to work his laptop when Owen returns from shopping.)
OWEN: Leave it.
DIANE: I can't if I want to fly a jet plane. Because that's all flying is now, sitting on your backside pressing buttons. You used to have to know how to fix an engine, how to gauge the wind but
OWEN: Leave it. Open this.
DIANE: Oh! It's beautiful.
(It is an evening dress.)

[Gwen's home]

(Gwen is pouring herself a glass of wine when Emma enters.)
GWEN: Well, how did it go?
EMMA: This coat I'm wearing is their latest fashion. Fifties inspired. They offered me a job on the spot.
GWEN: Oh, that's brilliant. Oh! Now we need to find you a flat somewhere near here.
EMMA: The shop's in a new branch in London. I've always dreamt about working in a London fashion house. They open the day after Boxing Day. I'll be a shop girl and a trainee buyer. And I can house share. They've given me contact numbers.
GWEN: London's a big city.
EMMA: That's what my mum used to say.
GWEN: There's no rush.
EMMA: There's nothing to keep me here.
GWEN: I'm sure we can find you something in Cardiff. You keep looking.

[Tourist Information Centre]

JOHN: Need to make a plan, get work, get my driving licence.
JACK: It'll all help.
JOHN: Thanks, Jack.
(Jack goes back to the Hub. John takes a set of car keys off the rack, then Ianto enters.)
JOHN: I was looking for a bus timetable. Want to get out to the DIY stores, see if there's any work going.
(Ianto hands him a timetable.)
IANTO: Best of luck.
JOHN: Right. Thank you.

[Car park]

(Owen parks up across four bays on the roof level. They are in evening dress.)
DIANE: Where are you taking me?
OWEN: We're here. Bear with me.

[Gwen's home]

(Rhys is sulking on the sofa.)
GWEN: We have had such a girly day shopping. What's up?
RHYS: Your mum rang. Funny thing, she's no idea who Emma is.
GWEN: No?
RHYS: And I'm thinking back to you and me on the couch. Work calls, you go out in the middle of the night and come back with a surprise relative. So let's have it, who exactly is Pollyanna? Oh, is it to do with work?
GWEN: It's so hard to explain.
RHYS: Do you even know her?
GWEN: She was lost. I'm sorry.
RHYS: What worries me is how easy it seems to be for you to lie to me, Gwen.
EMMA: It's my fault. I'll leave by tomorrow.
GWEN: You don't have to go. She's eighteen years old. I couldn't turn my back on her.
(Rhys walks out.)
GWEN: It's like two separate worlds. There's Torchwood, and then there's real life.
EMMA: That's why you've got to let me go.

[Car park]

(Owen pours champagne from the hamper in the boot.)
OWEN: I, er, couldn't help noticing you standing out here in that beautiful dress.
DIANE: This beautiful dress is a gift from my lover.
OWEN: Then he is a fool to let you go out in it alone.
DIANE: What shall we drink to?
OWEN: Chance meetings.
(They dance to the Tony Bennett classic, The Good Life, until she feels a chill under the Christmas full moon.)
DIANE: Let's go home.

[Jack's office]

(Jack's phone rings. He comes out of the hole where he spends his nights to answer it.)
JACK: Hello?

[Tourist Information Centre]

IANTO: My car keys are missing. John was behind the counter earlier on and I can't get hold of him.

[Jack's office]

(Jack tracks the car.)
JACK: He's gone home.

[Street]

(Outside the empty house.)
JACK: John?

[Garage]

(John is trying to gas himself with the exhaust fumes from Ianto's car.)
JACK: John!
(Jack drags him out.)
JOHN: Let me go.
JACK: You can't just throw it away, not without trying.
JOHN: I'm not as strong as you. You don't understand.
JACK: I do. I was born in the future, lived in your past. My time is gone too.
JOHN: Why are you doing this? Speaking to me in bloody riddles, keeping me here when my wife is dead, my son is a shell.
JACK: John, you're still young. You can get work, make friends, start a family.
JOHN: I did all that, Jack. Years ago. When I was meant to.
(Meanwhile, Owen and Diane are making desparate love.)
JACK: I wish I could say something.
JOHN: There's nothing to say or do.
JACK: I can't leave you here.
JOHN: Then we'll wait. The sun will rise, we'll have some breakfast, take a walk.
JACK: Yes. A new day.
JOHN: And I'll suffer it all and smile and wag my tail. And then as soon as your back is turned, I'll make sure I do it properly. Because I want to die.
JACK: You don't get reunited, John. It just goes black.
JOHN: How do you know?
JACK: I died once.
JOHN: Who are you?
JACK: A man, like you, out of his time, alone and scared.
JOHN: How do you cope?
JACK: It's just bearable. It has to be. I don't have a choice.
JOHN: But I do. If you want to help me, let me go with some dignity. Don't condemn me to live.
JACK: Are you scared?
JOHN: Yes.

[Owen's apartment]

DIANE: You're very quiet.
OWEN: I don't know if I can do this anymore. This isn't how it works for me. I've slept with enough women, I've done the fuck buddies thing. This is not it. I can't concentrate. All I see is you. All I can think about is what you're wearing, what you're thinking, what your face looks like when you come. It's been, what, a week? And it's like, when I'm not with you, I'm out of focus. How have you done this to me? I'm scared. I'm fucking scared.
DIANE: I love you too.
(Jack sits holding John's hand in the car as he inhales the carbon monoxide for the last time.
Owen has fallen asleep.)
DIANE: The thing about love is that you're always at its mercy.

[Coach station]

GWEN: Emma, these are your tickets, okay? On the back is your seat number, keep this with you at all times. I've also got you a return just in case. Now don't go talking to any strangers and phone me as soon as you get there, okay?
(Owen wakes to find a note on the pillow.)

[Airfield]

(Diane has got the Sky Gypsy out of the hangar.)
OWEN: No! I'm not letting you do this.
DIANE: I'm not a possession, Owen.
OWEN: You can't do this. It's madness.
DIANE: If I'd listened to everyone who told me that, I wouldn't have broken any records.

[Coach station]

GWEN: You don't have to go.
EMMA: If I don't, then I'll always wonder what it's like. London, Gwen.
GWEN: Okay. Go on.

[Airfield]

OWEN: Diane, you're not thinking straight. Let's talk about it.
DIANE: No, I'm sorry, Owen.
OWEN: We can make this work. You belong here now, with me.
DIANE: I belong in the sky.
OWEN: Well, we can get you up in the sky. In a couple of months you can fly whenever you want.
DIANE: Look, weather conditions are the same as the day we arrived. That rift will open again, I can feel it.
OWEN: Diane, listen to me, there is no way back. You cannot get home.
DIANE: Then it will take me somewhere new.

[Coach station]

(Gwen waves Emma goodbye.)
GWEN: Merry Christmas!

[Airfield]

OWEN: I'll come with you.
DIANE: I fly solo, Owen. I go faster and further than others.
OWEN: We have no idea how this rift works. You can end up anywhere.
DIANE: That's the beauty of it.
OWEN: It's too dangerous!
DIANE: It's what I do.
OWEN: What about me? Please, please, don't go.
(She puts her white silk scarf around his neck and kisses him.)
DIANE: What memories I'm taking with me.
(He backs away and she starts the engine, then blows him a kiss and taxis away.)
DIANE [OC]: Because when you take off together, it's the next best thing to flying.
(The Sky Gipsy vanishes from sight.)

<Back to the episode listing

Torchwood and related marks are trademarks of BBC . Copyright 1963, Present. The web pages on this site are for educational and entertainment purposes only. All other copyrights property of their respective holders.