Reign of Terror

Original Airdate: 12 Sep, 1964

(Transcriber's note - this story only exists now as an audio recording for episodes 4 and 5)

Episode One - A Land of Fear

[Forest]

(24 July, 1794 Two men dressed in unseasonably heavy cloaks move cautiously through the trees) 
(Moments later, the Tardis materialises in a clearing by a meadow)

[Tardis]

DOCTOR: There we are. Home.
BARBARA: Doctor, we
DOCTOR: It's all right. Chesterton made the position quite clear. Now, I have some work to do.
SUSAN: Grandfather, please.
DOCTOR: Hush, child. Say your goodbyes and remember, we shall be leaving almost immediately.
IAN: Do you have to be in such a hurry?
DOCTOR: Enough time has been wasted bringing you back, young man. I have the universe to explore.
SUSAN: Must you go?
BARBARA: Susan, we've visited many places together, had lots of adventures, but you always knew we intended to return home when we could.
SUSAN: Yes, I know, but
BARBARA: Look, I know it's hard to say goodbye, but one day you'll understand why we had to.
SUSAN: But Grandfather can bring you back any time now.
IAN: Don't you see, Susan, the longer we leave it the harder it'll be.
(Susan hugs them then leaves)
DOCTOR: Hmm. Still here?
IAN: Yes, we're waiting for you to carry out the checks.
DOCTOR: Quite unnecessary.
IAN: Oh is it? Are you so certain you know where we are?
DOCTOR: Certain? Of course I'm certain. If you doubt me, take a look for yourselves.
(switches on the scanner.)
DOCTOR: Perhaps that will satisfy you.
BARBARA: Mmm. It could be, I suppose.
DOCTOR: Thank you. Obviously you're still in doubt. Let us take a longer look, through the trees, hmm?
BARBARA: Ian, look. Fields, crops, it's fully cultivated!
IAN: Yes. Pity it's so dark. I can't see a sign of any buildings.
BARBARA: You know, it reminds me of a holiday I once took in Somerset.
DOCTOR: Then I expect it is Somerset, my dear. Well, if you're going, be off with you.
IAN: Look Doctor, I think it'd be better if you came with us. At least to explore.
DOCTOR: It's out of the question. I refuse to leave the ship.
IAN: Maybe you have succeeded. Maybe we are where you say we are. But I remember an occasion when you took us home once before.
BARBARA: Yes, and we met Marco Polo.
DOCTOR: Entirely different circumstances! I'm rather tired of your insinuations that I am not master of this craft. Oh, I admit, it did develop a fault, a minor fault on one occasion, perhaps twice, but nothing I couldn't control.
IAN: I know that. Of course you're in control. You're always in control. And I'm sure you could revisit us at any time.
DOCTOR: Very simple. Quite simple.
IAN: Exactly, quite simple. But you have your important researches to complete. You may not find the time. There's a chance that we won't meet again. Don't you think it would be better if we parted under more friendly circumstances, say over a drink?
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, well perhaps, since you put it that way, an hour or two won't come amiss. Susan, bring my stick will you?
SUSAN: Yes, Grandfather?
DOCTOR: I'm going to see Ian and Barbara back home safely.
(Susan and the Doctor leave)
BARBARA: Well done, Ian. I say, do you think we really are home?
IAN: I don't know. Won't take us long to find out, will it? Come on.

[Forest]

(The Doctor locks the Tardis as the others look around)
DOCTOR: Well?
BARBARA: Well those crops suggest a manor or farmhouse. It should be reasonably close.
SUSAN: It's very warm, isn't it? It must be summertime. Ian?
IAN: Yes?
SUSAN: Why aren't there any lights?
IAN: That's a point. It's dusk, and we've got a very good view from here.
BARBARA: Well, towns and villages can be well-spaced, even in England.
DOCTOR: Are we going to stand here talking all night, hmm? Hmm?
(there's a movement in the bushes)
IAN: All right, Susan, I saw it. Keep talking.
SUSAN: All right. Be careful though.
(Ian circles through the trees)
BARBARA: Did you see what it was?
SUSAN: No, I didn't.
DOCTOR: Perhaps it was a rabbit. Do you know, Chesterton's getting quite jumpy these days. Young man like him shouldn't suffer from nerves.
(Ian reappears with a boy)
BARBARA: Well, that rabbit of yours is putting up quite a fight. Ian, you're hurting him!
IAN: Oh, no, I'm not!
DOCTOR: Come here, my boy. Where are we? Where do you live, hmm?
SUSAN: Grandfather, you're frightening him. We're your friends. Don't be afraid.
BARBARA: Look at him. He's absolutely terrified.
IAN: Yes. Of us, or of something else?
DOCTOR: Come along, answer my questions, boy.
JEAN PIERRE: Please, I've done nothing.
IAN: We're not going to hurt you.
BARBARA: No of course, we're not. Look, we've lost our way and we need you help. This is England, isn't it?
JEAN PIERRE: England? No, France.
IAN: France? Well, how far from Paris?
JEAN PIERRE: Not far. Twelve kilometres.
IAN: Oh, that's something, I suppose.
DOCTOR: Paris, eh? A hundred miles or so either way is to be expected. After all, it's only a fraction of the distance we've covered. It's quite accurate, in fact.
IAN: Yes. Assuming the distance is our only error. You know, Doctor, I have a feeling you've been building up our hopes again.
DOCTOR: Oh, nonsense. Let's have a word with the boy. Now look here, my boy. Hold still
(Jean Pierre makes a break for it.)
IAN: We lost him.
DOCTOR: You don't say.
IAN: Pity. Probably knows these woods like the back of his hand.
SUSAN: I wonder why he was so afraid.

[Farm]

(a nearby farmhouse with derelict outbuildings and a crumbling stone wall. Jean Pierre knocks at the door and goes inside)

[Track]

DOCTOR: Chesterton, there's a house. Look, straight ahead of us.
IAN: Yes. What do you make of it, Barbara?
BARBARA: Well, it looks deserted. You know, I'm certain we're sometime in the past.
IAN: Yes. Well, we were a hundred miles out. Perhaps we're a hundred years out.
DOCTOR: Oh, rubbish, rubbish.
BARBARA: Well, it's possible.
IAN: You know, I think we ought to get back to the ship while we still can.
DOCTOR: Nonsense. It was your idea to explore, anyway. Besides, that might be very interesting. The walk will do us good.
SUSAN: Come on, you two. You don't want to be lost in the dark.
IAN: Don't worry, we're right behind you.
BARBARA: Well, we're still not home.
IAN: No, we're not, are we? Still, I do think he tried this time, even if it was out of bad temper.
BARBARA: So we stay with the ship.
IAN: Yes. Cheered Susan up, hasn't it?
BARBARA: Well, are you disappointed?
IAN: Funny enough, no. I don't know. Depends where we are. I still could be.
SUSAN: Ian! Barbara!
BARBARA: Well, we'd better join the others.

[Farmyard]

(The Doctor and Susan go into the courtyard)
DOCTOR: It looks uninhabited. I wonder if we can get in?
(Ian and Barbara enter.)
BARBARA: Did you find anything?
SUSAN: Not yet. Grandfather's seeing if he can get in.
IAN: Oh, is he now?
(The Doctor is looking through a dirty window)
IAN: Doctor?
DOCTOR: I say, take a look through there, will you? I think your eyes are sharper than mine.
IAN: Too dark to see anything, Doctor. No, I don't think anyone's lived here for years. Doctor? Doctor?
DOCTOR: We're in luck. The door's unlocked.

[Farmhouse]

(There are two fancy candlesticks on the table. The Doctor lights the candles)
DOCTOR: I'll take upstairs and you search down.
IAN: All right.
(The Doctor goes through the door to the stairs.)
BARBARA: Where's the Doctor?
IAN: He's gone upstairs. Look at this. What do you think a candlestick like that's doing in a place like this?
BARBARA: I don't know.
IAN: Here's a tinderbox.
SUSAN: Look at this!
(it's a chest full of clothes)
BARBARA: Hey, this is eighteenth century.
SUSAN: Look at this one!
BARBARA: You know, there's a whole wardrobe here. Look, they're all different sizes too.
IAN: Look at these bundles. Bottles of wine. Bread. A bit stale.
BARBARA: There's another bundle over here. Hey, look at all these maps. There's a whole bunch of daggers down here.
IAN: These documents. Official documents. Undated and the name is left blank. They're passes, Barbara.
BARBARA: Yes, but nobody lives here. I mean, look at the dust everywhere.
IAN: This is a stopping-off place. A link in some escape chain. Here, look at this.
BARBARA: Ian, this is signed by Robespierre!
IAN: Robespierre? Must be a. Oh, wait a minute. The Doctor's put us down right in the middle of the French Revolution.
BARBARA: Yes. The Reign of Terror. (Upstairs, the Doctor has been hit from behind and knocked out)
(Downstairs, the group are getting dressed with clothes the chest)
IAN: Doctor? Doctor?
BARBARA: How do I look?
IAN: Very pretty, mademoiselle. Hairstyle's a bit modern, but it's all right. It was a good idea to change into these clothes. We won't look so conspicuous when we go back to the ship.
SUSAN: We might not get back to the ship if Grandfather hears we're in the Reign of Terror.
IAN: Why not?
SUSAN: It's his favourite period in the history of Earth.
IAN: Not getting very far, are we? What on Earth's he doing up there? Come on. Let's go and find him.
(there are two men in the doorway, with pistols.)
ROUVRAY: Don't move. Please put that on the table.
(the candlestick is put down.)
ROUVRAY: Thank you. What are you doing here?
D'ARGENSON: Don't waste time, Rouvray. Kill them. They're after us.
ROUVRAY: I think not, but I would advise you to answer the question.
BARBARA: We're travellers.
SUSAN: We only stopped here til we could find our way.
ROUVRAY: At a deserted house?
D'ARGENSON: You'll gain nothing by this questioning. We should be moving on!
ROUVRAY: Patience, d'Argenson, even in these troubled times our visitors have the right of an explanation, even if our enemies do not accord such privileges.
IAN: We're not your enemies. We are what we say we are, travellers.
ROUVRAY: When you entered our hideout, you entered our lives. Do you travel alone?
BARBARA: Yes.
D'ARGENSON: You see, they lie!
ROUVRAY: We found the old man upstairs. Do not count on his assistance.
SUSAN: What have you done with him?
ROUVRAY: At the moment he's safe. It was in your power to see that he came to no harm. But your answer proves that you do not speak truthfully. There is something you are concealing.
IAN: It doesn't concern you.
D'ARGENSON: We must be leaving now. The soldiers will have followed!
ROUVRAY: In France now there are only two sides. You're either with us or against us. Our sympathies are obvious. We want to know yours.
BARBARA: We appreciate what you say, but we have no side. We're not even French.
ROUVRAY: A word of warning. If you intend to stay in France you will have to choose.
D'ARGENSON: We cannot trust them now!
ROUVRAY: If we are to escape from France, we must have faith. If all people are incapable of our trust, we shall take the Terror with us.
SUSAN: Where is my Grandfather?
ROUVRAY: The old man? D'Argenson, go.
IAN: Shh! Listen.
(armed men emerge from the forest)
D'ARGENSON: The soldiers! They've found us!
ROUVRAY: Quiet.
D'ARGENSON: But they'll take us to Paris, to the guillotine. Rouvray, I can't, I can't let that happen. My whole family were executed, even my younger sister. They came to the house while I was out and they dragged them away. Rouvray, we must go while we have the chance!
ROUVRAY: They will see us. Our only hope is to stay here and hide. They may pass.
IAN: They're coming in.
D'ARGENSON: It will be the guillotine for all of us!
ROUVRAY: D'Argenson. D'Argenson, quiet!
(Rouvray gives Ian his spare pistol.)

[Farmyard]

SERGEANT: (to soldiers) Wait here! The pigs will still be running. They won't have stopped yet.
LIEUTENANT: This is their route according to our information, sergeant. They could be hiding in this house.
SERGEANT: I'll have the men search the place.
LIEUTENANT: No. No, let's let them rest. They've had a long march. We'll cover the back.
SERGEANT: We'll block their escape.
LIEUTENANT: If they are in there, we can let them suffer the waiting.
SERGEANT: You. Round the back.
SOLDIER: Go yourself, citizen!
(The other soldiers laugh.)
SERGEANT: And if they run, you'll have the chance of stopping them.
SOLDIER: Yes. It's a long time since I had a royalist to myself.
SERGEANT: Keep your eyes open.
SOLDIER: Don't worry. They won't get past me.

[Farmhouse]

IAN: They're not coming in.
ROUVRAY: No. The intention is to break our nerve.
(as they wait)
ROUVRAY: and then we were warned to leave or face arrest and execution. Friends warn us, and friends denounce us.
IAN: It seems the soldiers followed you. Who knew you were taking this road?
ROUVRAY: Who indeed. It's difficult to have secrets these days.
SUSAN: Ian. Grandfather.
ROUVRAY: The old man? He's upstairs somewhere. D'Argenson? You dealt with him.
IAN: Never mind. I'll find him.
(Ian goes upstairs and D'Argenson runs for the door)
ROUVRAY: D'Argenson! Come back! You fool!

[Farmyard]

(D'Argenson is surrounded. No one notices Rouvray until)
LIEUTENANT: Sergeant! Rouvray.
ROUVRAY: Don't move! And get away from that man.
LIEUTENANT: Take him!
ROUVRAY: You'll listen to me!
(he steps in front of D'Argenson)
LIEUTENANT: So Rouvray, your voice still carries authority, even to my soldiers.
ROUVRAY: You. Come here. Give it to me.
(he takes a musket from a soldier and throws it away)
ROUVRAY: You can give them uniforms, Lieutenant, but they remain peasants underneath.
(another soldier shoots Rouvray)
SOLDIER: Let's get the other one! Hold him! Hold him!
(D'Argenson is grabbed. The Lieutenant checks Rouvray's body)
LIEUTENANT: A desperate attempt, and it very nearly worked.
(the soldiers shoot D'Argenson, and laugh)

[Farmhouse, upstairs]

IAN: Doctor? Doctor? Where are you?
(The Doctor is still out cold in a locked room. Susan screams and Ian goes downstairs)

[Farmhouse]

(Ian is caught by the soldiers and disarmed)
LIEUTENANT: My sergeant was right. It did pay us to look in the house.
IAN: We are not
LIEUTENANT: Silence! If any of them speak again without permission, shoot them.
SERGEANT: The bodies have been removed, Lieutenant. What about these?
LIEUTENANT: Outside.
SERGEANT: Go on, you heard the Lieutenant, move!
SOLDIER: Outside into the courtyard.
(Upstairs, the Doctor is waking up)

[Farmyard]

(Ian, Susan and Barbara are lined up against a wall in front of a firing squad)
SERGEANT: Load muskets!
SOLDIER: We already have. Get out the way.
LIEUTENANT: Stop. We take them to Paris.
SOLDIER: No, we'll shoot them here.
LIEUTENANT: We've got the men we came for.
SOLDIER: Yes, and more. I say we kill them.
LIEUTENANT: Now listen. Listen. We also want credit for our additional prisoners. LeMaitre may not believe us if he doesn't see them for himself.
SOLDIER: That's true.
SERGEANT: But there may be a reward.
SOLDIER: The sergeant's right, perhaps there is a reward.
LIEUTENANT: And besides, why should we do what Madame Guillotine can do so much better?
SOLDIER: Let's take them to Paris. To the guillotine!
(they untie the prisoner's feet)
SOLDIER: Move!
(Ian, Susan and Barbara are lead away)
SERGEANT: Wait. We'll burn the house down!
(He throws a burning torch into the hay loft, and others follow his example. Soon the house itself catches fire)

[Farmhouse, upstairs]

(The Doctor is surrounded by smoke, and thumps on the door)
DOCTOR: Help! Can you hear me?

[Forest]

SUSAN: Is there really no sign of him?
BARBARA: The house! Look at the house!
SUSAN: What about Grandfather?
BARBARA: I'm sure he got out, Susan.
IAN: I hope so, for all our sakes.
SOLDIER: Get moving!
(when they've gone, the boy Jean-Pierre comes out of the bushes)

[Farmhouse, upstairs]

DOCTOR: Hello! Hello! Can you hear me? Get me out!
(the smoke gets to him, and the roof begins to fall in)

Episode Two - Guests of Madame Guillotine

[Office]

(Paris, 25 July 1794, morning, at Conciergerie Prison)
BARBARA: Are we to be allowed to tell our story?
JUDGE: Prisoners are not required to speak. I have the charges here. You were found in the house with Rouvray and D'Argenson and arrested by a platoon of soldiers. I am satisfied as to your guilt as being in the company of wanted traitors. The sentence, immediate execution.
BARBARA: We demand the right to speak.
JUDGE: You have no rights! You will be guillotined as soon as it can be arranged. Take them to the cells!

[Jail corridor]

(Ian is put into a cell with another man)
JAILER: Stay back, by the wall.
BARBARA: Ian!
SUSAN: Ian!
JAILER: Go away. Keep hold of her, can't you? (to Ian) I told you to stay back by the wall. There's nothing to interest you.
(further along, down some steps)
JAILER: Stay with her over there. Lady like you shouldn't be kept in this pig sty. Course, I have the keys. It wouldn't be very difficult to leave a few doors open, now, would it?
BARBARA: No, of course not. But I couldn't pay you. I don't have any money.
JAILER: The soldiers in this place, they're nothing but peasants. Not fit company for an intelligent man like myself. Gets very lonely in here sometimes. Very lonely indeed. Now, if we were to be friends, eh?
(Barbara slaps him across the face)
JAILER: You'll regret that! I promise you. Here! Lock them away. No, in there. It's the cell I keep for my special guests.

[Woman's cell]

(straw on the floor, one bunk and a high barred window)
SUSAN: The smell in here. Oh, it's terrible!
BARBARA: Yes, it reminds me of when we were prisoners before, in the prehistoric age.
SUSAN: Oh, yes. I remember that. But there was one very important difference. Grandfather and Ian were with us then. I wish I could see where we were. Oh. You'll have to lift me up, Barbara. Barbara?
BARBARA: Sorry. Yes.
(Barbara lifts Susan up to the window)
SUSAN: I can't see very much down there. It's just a prison yard. There's nothing to the right. That's no good. Oh, if only I knew where Grandfather was.
BARBARA: He'd have got out of that house, Susan. I know he would.

[Farmyard]

(The Doctor wakes and the boy gives him a drink of water)
DOCTOR: Yes. Thank you. Oh, It's most refreshing. Where are my fiends, hmm?
JEAN-PIERRE: The soldiers set fire to the farmhouse and took them to Paris, to the Conciergerie Prison. They'll be locked up there before they go to the guillotine.
DOCTOR: Oh. Oh, very brave boy.
JEAN-PIERRE: Are you feeling all right now, sir?
DOCTOR: Yes, I think so. Thank you. It's quite remarkable. How could I ever begin to thank you?
JEAN-PIERRE: You see, there were two men hiding in the house. One of them knocked you over the head. Then the soldiers came and the two men were shot and your friends arrested.
DOCTOR: Oh, it's a tragic business.
JEAN-PIERRE: But you can still escape. My mother can give you some food. Our farm isn't far away. Just over there. And that way leads to Paris.
DOCTOR: Yes, I must rescue my friends.
JEAN-PIERRE: But you mustn't do that, sir! You'll be captured, sent to the guillotine.
DOCTOR: You saved me, my boy, so I must rescue them. Now you can understand that, can't you?
JEAN-PIERRE: Yes. I wish I could come with you, but since my father was taken away, he told me to look after my mother.
DOCTOR: Yes, yes, yes. Now, you're the head of the house. Yes. Yes, well I oh, thank you. Thank you for everything. And what's your name?
JEAN-PIERRE: Jean-Pierre.
DOCTOR: I shall remember. Yes. Jean-Pierre. Au revoir, Monsieur Captain.

[Women's cell]

(Susan and Barbara pretend to be asleep when the jailer looks in)
BARBARA: He's going.
SUSAN: Oh, what's the use? We'll never get out of this dreadful place.
BARBARA: Oh, you mustn't lose heart, Susan.
SUSAN: I'm not going to fool myself.
BARBARA: Well, think of the times we've been in trouble before. We've always managed to get out of it in the end.
SUSAN: Oh, we've been lucky. We can't go on being lucky. Things catch up with you.
BARBARA: I've never heard you talk like this before. You're usually so optimistic.
SUSAN: I want to know about Grandfather.
BARBARA: I'm sure he's all right, Susan.
SUSAN: You keep on saying that. I just want to know, that's all.
BARBARA: Look, we should try and get out of here. It hasn't always been luck, you know. We made our own opportunities. Did you notice that we came past the river to get here?
SUSAN: Oh, you're not going to dig your way out, are you?
BARBARA: Well, why not?
SUSAN: It's solid stone.
BARBARA: Hey, there's a damp patch in the wall here. Hmm. Maybe a sewer leading to the river.
SUSAN: Yes. All you need are a couple of dozen drills and a gang of men and you might, might get out. What are you looking at?
BARBARA: Crowbars. May not be necessary to dig our way out after all. I might be able to lever up one of those stones with this.
(Barbara uses a cross-strut from the bedframe)
BARBARA: Look. You go over there and keep your eye open for the jailer.
SUSAN: Shh!
(the guards pass with a new prisoner)

[Jail corridor]

JAILER: Put him in there.
(he looks in on Ian)
JAILER: Don't make so much noise. You'll give the place a bad name.

[Ian's cell]

(Ian's cell mate has a bad wound)
WEBSTER: Sorry, Ian. My side's hurting again.
IAN: The bleeding's stopped, Webster. You've lost a lot of blood.
WEBSTER: As soon as we were arrested we couldn't wait to pull the trigger. Is there any more water?
IAN: Yes. Must be about the last of it. You know, I've looked this place over, and it isn't impossible to escape.
WEBSTER: It is for me, and you know it. I'll never get up from here. Listen, you're an Englishman. You must help me.
IAN: How?
WEBSTER: One day soon, France will stop this madness and turn her full attention across the channel. We must be ready for that day. There's a man in France, Englishman, working to that end. He will tell us when that day is near. You understand?
IAN: England at war with France? Yes, I know that.
WEBSTER: I was sent to bring him home to England. The day nears that his information is important. Find him if you can. Try to escape. Try. Promise to find James Stirling, and home. Promise! Promise!
IAN: Yes, yes. James Stirling. Find James Stirling and tell him to get back to England. He has important information. I understand and I promise. Where shall I find him, Webster?
WEBSTER: Jules Renan.
IAN: Jules Renan, yes.
WEBSTER: The sign of Le Chien Gris.
IAN: Le Chien Gris.
(Webster dies, at peace)

[The road to Paris]

(a group of men are working by the roadside)
OVERSEER: Come on, put your backs into it. You can work faster than that.
DOCTOR: Good day. Pleasant day, sir.
OVERSEER: Yes, it is.
DOCTOR: I wonder if you can assist me. I'm bound for Paris. Am I still on the right road?
OVERSEER: You are.
DOCTOR: Splendid. Splendid. I was beginning to have my doubts. I haven't seen a soul for hours.
OVERSEER: You've come a long way?
DOCTOR: Yes. Further than you would think.
OVERSEER: Get on with your work! Nobody told you to stop. I have to watch them all the time. I don't even know why they bother to put them to work. You know what I'd do with tax dodgers?
DOCTOR: Oh, so they're not volunteers, eh?
OVERSEER: Volunteers? Ha. I have to watch them every second. I'm given a schedule. Finish this section by tomorrow, they told me. And if I don't
DOCTOR: Yes, quite a responsibility.
OVERSEER: But it'll be finished, even if I have to drive every one of them into the ground.
DOCTOR: Yes, I see you believe in drastic measures, eh?
OVERSEER: Now, put your backs into it. Look as if you mean it. The sooner its finished, the better it'll be for all of us.
DOCTOR: I'm sure you're very experienced at this job, my man. But, as an impartial onlooker I think I might have a bit of an advice to give you.
OVERSEER: Well, I'll listen to anything that'll get this job finished quickly.
DOCTOR: Well, if you were to expend your energy helping with the road, instead of bawling and shouting at them every few seconds, you might be able to get somewhere. Good day to you, sir!
OVERSEER: I suppose you think you're very clever.
DOCTOR: Well, without any undue modesty, yes! Now, would you mind standing aside?
OVERSEER: Now, show me your papers, or something to prove your identity.
DOCTOR: I am not in the habit of
OVERSEER: I see. You can't prove your identity. Have you paid your taxes? No? Then perhaps you'd join the poor wretches and put your energy to better use. Give him a pick.
OVERSEER: Now get to work, skinny. I shouldn't try to run away. Remember, I've got this.
(it's a gun)
DOCTOR: Common fellow.
OVERSEER: Well, what are you waiting for? Get to work! I'll complete that schedule yet.

[Women's cell]

BARBARA: Oh, I must rest. It's tearing my hands to pieces.
SUSAN: Well, shall I take over?
BARBARA: No, no. Your hands are worse than mine.
SUSAN: I wonder what Ian's doing? Barbara, I think I'll work. It takes my mind off things.
(she hits herself instead of the damp stonework)
SUSAN: Oh!
BARBARA: Come on, we'll rest.
SUSAN: I can't do it, Barbara.
BARBARA: And we'll start again later. We've make good progress. We should be through soon.
SUSAN: It takes so long. Still, we have done well, haven't we? Someone's coming. Barbara, they're coming for us!
JAILER: There's your food. A waste if you ask me. What are they doing down there?
BARBARA: What?
JAILER: The blankets. I'm responsible for everything in the cells. Pick them up! All right, all right. It gets cold at night. You'll get no others.
LEMAITRE [OC]: Jailer!
JAILER: LeMaitre.
LEMAITRE [OC]: Jailer!
JAILER: Coming, Citizen!

[Ian's cell]

LEMAITRE: How long has he been dead? I asked how long he's been dead.
IAN: Several hours, citizen.
LEMAITRE: Did he speak?
IAN: No. No, he didn't.

[Jailer's office]

LEMAITRE: I'll ask you once more. Did they talk to each other?
JAILER: Well, they may have done so, citizen, but, well
LEMAITRE: Just simply tell me if you heard their voices.
JAILER: Yes. Well, yes, citizen. he did. I didn't know what he said, but I definitely heard them speak. But not for long.
LEMAITRE: Let me have the execution list.
JAILER: At once, citizen!
LEMAITRE: The other prisoner, which one is he?
JAILER: Ian Chesterton.
(LeMaitre crosses out Ian's name)
LEMAITRE: Have the body removed from the cell.
JAILER: Yes, citizen. Guards!

[Women's cell]

(Susan and Barbara are eating)
SUSAN: Well, I felt sure he'd discover that.
BARBARA: Yes, so did I. You know, I'd no idea how hungry I was. Or what I'd eat.
SUSAN: I think I'll get back to work now.
BARBARA: Oh. no, it was my turn, Susan.
SUSAN: No, it's all right. (a little shriek)
BARBARA: What is it?
SUSAN: Rats!
BARBARA: Rats?
SUSAN: They must have smelt the food. Barbara, there's rats down there.
(Barbara puts the blankets into the hole they've made)
SUSAN: Barbara. I can't do it anymore. Not with those down there. I can't do it! I can't!
BARBARA: They won't come in. Not now. We won't do any more digging. We'll just stay where we are.

[The road to Paris]

DOCTOR: It's the tenth time he's counted his wealth.
PEASANT: He does it all the time. Some of us thinks he likes money better than he likes himself.
DOCTOR: Do any of you got any money, hmm?
PEASANT: Would we be here if we had?
DOCTOR: You want to leave here, don't you?
PEASANT: Well, yes, but how? He never goes anywhere without that pistol and he never turns his back!
DOCTOR: Well, do as I say. Follow me.
(The Doctor points into the sky)
DOCTOR: Ah! Ah, ha! Yes, there it is.
OVERSEER: What's this? What are you staring at?
DOCTOR: We're waiting for the eclipse, look.
OVERSEER: Eclipse?
DOCTOR: Yes.
PEASANT: He said the moon is going to pass in front of the sun at any moment. See! Look!
DOCTOR: Yes, you've heard about it, haven't you?
OVERSEER: Yes, yes, yes. I've heard.
DOCTOR: Yes. It's quite a phenomenon, isn't it? Yes.
OVERSEER: All right, all right. We'll see it when it happens. Until then, get back to work. Now!
(meanwhile, the Doctor has stolen several gold coins from the overseer's purse. He drops them into the soil and covers them, then pretends to find one again)
DOCTOR: Ah! Look! Look at the coin!
OVERSEER: What's wrong now?
DOCTOR: I've just found this coin down there. It must come from some hidden treasure.
OVERSEER: Treasure? More likely dropped by a passing traveller.
DOCTOR: No, no, definitely a hidden treasure.
OVERSEER: Now where were you digging?
DOCTOR: Just there. Just there.
(the overseer begins to dig)
OVERSEER: Here's another.
DOCTOR: Catch his spade! Stop!
OVERSEER: Just stand back! It's nothing to do with you. Nothing! I'll do the digging and then it'll be mine. Now stand back.
(the Doctor takes a shovel and hits the overseer over the head)
PEASANT: Sacre bleu!
(the press ganged workers flee)
DOCTOR: Good day to you, sir! Pleasant dreams.

[Jail corridor]

JAILER: All right you two, come on out. Stand in line.
SUSAN: Where's Ian?
JAILER: Was that your friend? He was lucky. LeMaitre crossed him off the list. You're not so fortunate. This batch for the guillotine! Take them away!

[Ian's cell]

(Ian sees the women being taken to the tumbril through his window)
IAN: Barbara. Susan.

Episode Three - A Change of Identity

[Street]

(Evening. The Doctor has arrived in Paris. Near the prison, two armed men are hiding)
JEAN: A tumbril should have passed by now, Jules.
JULES: You must try and cultivate patience, my friend. It will stand you in good stead.
JEAN: I will never get used to the waiting. If only it wasn't so quiet.
JULES: That's why we're here, Jean. A crowded street and a successful rescue will never mix.
JEAN: I know. But it is late. Perhaps they've taken another route?
JULES: No, they'll come this way. They always do. Are you ready?
JEAN: Yes, I'm ready. How many soldiers do you think there'll be?
JULES: Six, maybe five.
JEAN: It's a pity Leon isn't with us today. The odds would have been more favourable.
JULES: Yes, I admit Leon would have been a great help, but don't forget we have surprise on our side. It is worth three men.
JEAN: They must have left the prison later than usual.

[Jail corridor]

(It is meal time for the prisoners. Bowls of gruel are being delivered)
JAILER: (to Ian) If you want some food, get back against the wall and stay there!
(The jailer is relocking the door when LeMaitre appears)
LEMAITRE: Jailer!
JAILER: Yes, citizen? Yes?
LEMAITRE: Here. Immediately!
JAILER: Coming. Coming, citizen!
LEMAITRE: Jailer!
(The key has stuck in the lock. The jailer decides to leave it where it is and rushes to LeMaitre)

[Jailer's office]

LEMAITRE: Didn't you hear me calling you?
JAILER: I'm sorry, citizen, I came as fast as I could. I was busy with the food.
LEMAITRE: Prison food is unimportant! You realise that Robespierre will be asking to see the execution figures?
JAILER: I have them ready, citizen.
LEMAITRE: I hope for your sake that they're satisfactory. Otherwise, instead of being jailer here, you could find yourself a prisoner.

[Ian's cell]

(Ian goes to get his bowl, looks through the door bars and notices the keys in the lock. He reaches through the bars and gently works the keys out of the lock. He takes his own cell key from the cluster and then finally manages to put the rest in the lock again. Then he has his gruel)

[Jailer's office]

LEMAITRE: Good, good.
JAILER: Thank you, citizen, thank you. My only wish is to serve the cause to the best of my ability.
LEMAITRE: Nevertheless, loyalty should not go unrewarded.
JAILER: Citizen, I seek no reward.
LEMAITRE: That is as it should be, but I shall see to it that your name is mentioned in the right quarter.
(LeMaitre leaves. The jailer remembers the stuck key and rushes back to the cells to find them. He looks in on Ian, takes the keys and leaves)

[Street]

(The tumbril has stopped unexpectedly)
BARBARA: Susan, I think the horse has thrown a shoe. The moment they start to unhitch it, we'll make a run for it.
SUSAN: I don't think I can, Barbara. I don't feel very well.
BARBARA: Look, I'll help you but you must make an effort.
SUSAN: All right. I'll do my best.
BARBARA: Good. Now, as soon as soon as they start to lead the horse away.
(Women watching from an upper window think the whole thing is very funny. Jules and Jean are nearby)
JEAN: It is them?
JULES: Yes. It looks as if they've had soon trouble with the horse.
JEAN: That is why they were so late. We were right to come looking for them. Are you ready?
JULES: Yes.
JEAN: You see how big the guard is, don't you?
JULES: Yes, four. But one of them's taken the horse away. I think we're in luck.
JEAN: You know what to do. I'll take the one on the right.
BARBARA: Susan, are you ready? Come on, now.
SUSAN: Oh, I can't! You go, Barbara.
BARBARA: Don't be silly. Come on! Pull yourself together!
SUSAN: Oh, my head's splitting and my back's aching.
BARBARA: All right, Susan. It's all right.
(Jean and Jules shoot one guard, then another. Jules shoots the third in the back then they both help Susan and Barbara down from the tumbril and lead them away)

[Tailor's shop]

(The Doctor enters)
TAILOR: Good evening, citizen.
DOCTOR: Good evening.
TAILOR: I was just about to close my humble shop, but if I can be of service?
DOCTOR: Yes, yes, very likely.
TAILOR: Did you see the executions today, citizen?
DOCTOR: Hmm? Oh, no, no, I didn't.
TAILOR: I missed them too. Most unusual. Citizen Robespierre is doing a fine job, don't you think, hounding out the traitors?
DOCTOR: Yes, splendid fellow. You seem to be very interested in these traitors.
TAILOR: I consider it my duty.
DOCTOR: Then perhaps you can confirm that newly arrested prisoners are taken to the, what is it, the Conciergerie Prison? Hmm?
TAILOR: That is correct, citizen. As a matter of fact, you can see the prison from the end of the street here.
(The Doctor selects a coat from a rack)
TAILOR: A wise choice, citizen. There is no finer set of apparel in all of Paris.
DOCTOR: Yes, I was thinking of something new along these lines.
TAILOR: Yes, it would certainly be more suitable than what you're wearing at present.
(notices a sash hanging)
DOCTOR: That's very impressive.
TAILOR: Yes, citizen. It signifies the position of regional officer of the provinces.
DOCTOR: Yes, I'm quite aware of that. Yes, quite aware. Yes. In fact, it's a post that I myself personally occupy.
TAILOR: I see. I'm sorry, citizen.
DOCTOR: Don't apologise. I want to try that on.
TAILOR: Certainly, citizen. The quality is unmatched, and in comparison, the price
DOCTOR: The price is of no matter. I haven't any money.
TAILOR: No money?
DOCTOR: No. No, I though possibly we could arrange an exchange.
TAILOR: For this?
DOCTOR: What's wrong with it?
TAILOR: Nay, it's little better than a fancy dress outfit.
DOCTOR: A fancy dress? My dear sir, I doubt that you've seen a coat like it.
TAILOR: I agree.
DOCTOR: Am I correct to assume that you're not interested?
TAILOR: You realise there is not much call for a
DOCTOR: Have you had a similar coat like this in your shop?
TAILOR: Never.
DOCTOR: Then I can understand why there has been no call.
TAILOR: It is a heavy material, I grant you, and perhaps with a few alterations. You are offering the entire outfit?
DOCTOR: Exactly. Of course.
TAILOR: Yes, well, I shall require something else too. Like that ring you're wearing, for example.
(a brief deathly silence)
DOCTOR: You may have it, providing you agree to let me have parchment and writing materials into the bargain, hmm?
TAILOR: Very well.
DOCTOR: Then we have a bargain, my dear sir.

[Chez Jules]

(a comfortable suburban dwelling)
SUSAN: Thank you. Oh, I feel better already.
JEAN: Danielle?
DANIELLE: Jean.
JULES: We have closed the rest of the house and sent the servants away. It is safer.
DANIELLE: I expect you'd like a bath and some food. I'll prepare it for you. Jean, will you help me?
(Danielle and Jean leave)
JULES: It is not exactly a palace, but you're both very welcome here.
BARBARA: What can I say? I can't begin to thank you.
JULES: Oh, please. I insist you do not even mention it. It is one of my rules.
BARBARA: All right. I don't even know your name.
JULES: And that is another of my rules. Christian names only. The less my friends and I know, the less we can admit to when questioned. So permit me. I am Jules.
BARBARA: Barbara, and this is Susan.
(Danielle and Jean return with food)
JULES: This is my sister, Danielle. She's looking after us. This is my young friend, Jean.
BARBARA: How do you do.
JULES: I expect you're wondering what is going to happen to you. Well, after you have eaten, you must rest. Then tomorrow we will make arrangements to smuggle you away from France.
SUSAN: But you can't do that.
JULES: Why not?
SUSAN: Barbara. Grandfather.
BARBARA: Yes, and Ian. He's still in the prison.

[Jail corridor]

IAN [OC]: Jailer?
(Ian reaches through the bars and unlocks his cell. He is out. Ian relocks his cell and goes carefully up the corridor. He finds the jailer on the floor, injured and with a bottle by his side. Ian makes his escape then LeMaitre comes from his hiding place)
LEMAITRE: Did Webster give you a message for James Stirling or not? We shall see. We shall see.

[Chez Jules]

(The meal is finished)
SUSAN: I do feel better after that.
BARBARA: Here, let me help.
DANIELLE: No, Barbara. You stay where you are. Jean and I can manage.
BARBARA: Jules?
JULES: They can manage. Now, you both agreed to tell me your story.
SUSAN: Yes, what about the map?
JULES: Oh, yes.
(Jules spreads a large map on the table)
JULES: Here we are.
SUSAN: Now according to the sun's position, we were travelling south.
BARBARA: Yes, let's see. Forest should be in this area, here.
SUSAN: Yes, And there was a group of houses, wasn't there?
BARBARA: Yes.
SUSAN: Yes. That would be the forest.
BARBARA: Yes, turn it round this way.
SUSAN: Okay.
BARBARA: Jules, I think we can show you now. We arrived in this area here.
SUSAN: Yes, we walked through the forest, you see. Then we got lost. So we asked our way at a house and. Where was the house?
BARBARA: Here it is.
SUSAN: Ah.
BARBARA: That's where we saw the soldiers, remember?
JULES: Are you sure?
SUSAN: Yes.
JULES: Jean!
BARBARA: What's wrong?
SUSAN: We didn't find Grandfather though. We don't even know if he got away.
BARBARA: Susan, wait a minute.
JULES: Show Jean where you were arrested.
SUSAN: Just here.
JULES: Did you meet two men there?
BARBARA: Yes. How did you know?
JEAN: Their names?
BARBARA: D'Argenson.
JULES: And Rouvray.
JEAN: They must have discovered our escape route, Jules.
JULES: They may have just been unlucky. We'll wait till we've heard from Leon. The route is his responsibility. Were d'Argenson and Rouvray brought back with you?
BARBARA: No. There was a fight with the soldiers. They were shot.
JEAN: Soldiers? Jules, this isn't the first time.
JULES: Oh, later, later.
JEAN: Someone's informing on us.
JULES: Later, Jean.
SUSAN: You knew those men, didn't you?
JULES: Hmm? Yes. Yes, we did. We rescued them as we did you. In their case our effort was wasted.
BARBARA: So this isn't the first time you've risked your life?
JEAN: Not all Frenchmen can allow innocent people to be led to the guillotine, Barbara. Jules has saved many lives.
JULES: It would appear that my that luck is running out.
JEAN: Luck? Not if what I say is true.
JULES: I shall sort it out, Jean. Now, you say your Grandfather was left here.
SUSAN: Yes, in that house.
JULES: Then I shall send someone to search for him as soon as I can.
BARBARA: There were four of us all together. Ian, as I've already told you, is still in the prison.
JULES: I promise you, I give you my word, that I will not rest until the four of you have been brought together again.
BARBARA: Headache again?
SUSAN: Ah, yes. It keeps coming and going.
JULES: The young lady needs sleep. Danielle?
BARBARA: If you could show me where
JULES: Danielle will escort you.
DANIELLE: Oh yes, come with me. You look worn out.
SUSAN: If I could just lie down.
JULES: Sleep well, and have pleasant dreams.
SUSAN: Thank you. Goodnight.
JULES: Goodnight, Susan.
(The women leave. There's a knock on the door. Jean takes his pistol and opens the door)
JEAN: Oh, Leon.
LEON: I'm sorry it's so late, but I have a message for Jules.
JULES: Leon! It's good to see you.
JEAN: D'Argenson and Rouvray were taken.
JULES: Not now, Jean. Well Leon, what's wrong?
LEON: There is a man. A stranger. He's been asking for you.
JULES: Oh?
LEON: He's being watched. He's by the inn near the prison. We thought you should know.
JULES: Yes, thank you. We'll take care of it.
JULES: Oh Barbara, this is a good friend of mine, Leon. Barbara. She's here with a young friend. They're staying with us for a few days.
BARBARA: I'm pleased to meet you.
(Leon kisses Barbara's hand)
LEON: Hello.
JULES: We're slipping out for a while, Barbara. It won't be for long.
LEON: I'll take good care of her, Jules.
JULES: Come, Jean. Don't delay.
(Jean and Jules leave)
LEON: Perhaps you'd care for some wine?
BARBARA: Yes. Thank you.

[Jailer's office]

(The jailer's head is bandaged, and he is still drinking)
DOCTOR [OC]: Let me in, you fools! I could have you shot at dawn. Get it open, will you?
(the jail door is opened)
DOCTOR [OC]: Ah, that's better. Thank you. Open again? You don't want all the prisoners to escape, do you?
(The Doctor is in his new revolutionary costume)
DOCTOR: Who is in charge of this prison, hmm? Well, speak up, my man!
JAILER: I am, citizen.
DOCTOR: My credentials.
(The Doctor hands over a piece of paper then grabs it back again)
DOCTOR: And while we are about it, why wasn't I met, hmm? Do you realise that I walked through the whole of Paris without a guard? Me?
JAILER: We would have arrange an escort had we been advised of your
DOCTOR: You were advised! I forwarded the communication myself. What if Robespierre hears about this?
JAILER: Robespierre? Why, I don't think you should worry the first deputy, citizen. He's a very busy man. I am at your service, citizen. Anything you wish to know.
DOCTOR: Very well. Very well. Thank you. Yes. You seem a capable man and I'm sure this misunderstanding is none of your doing.
JAILER: Oh, indeed citizen. I am most conscientious, but when you're assisted by idiots.
DOCTOR: Of course, of course. And I'm glad we understand each other.
JAILER: Some wine, citizen?
DOCTOR: No, thank you.
JAILER: I would deem it a privilege if I could be of help.
DOCTOR: Thank you, citizen! It's all perfectly simple. Three traitors were brought here. A man, a woman and a young child. They fled from my province. I'm sure you remember them?
JAILER: Ah, yes. Ah, yes. Er.
DOCTOR: Well? If they're still here.
JAILER: The women were dispatched to the guillotine. Unfortunately, there was a rescue.
DOCTOR: What? By whom?
JAILER: We don't know! Many times traitors have been snatched away on the road to the guillotine. You understand, of course, that I cannot be held responsible?
DOCTOR: Yes.
JAILER: They were outside my jurisdiction.
DOCTOR: Yes. Of course, if course. And the man? You haven't mentioned him.
JAILER: No. Well, the man, er, well er.
DOCTOR: Well, come along. Out with it, man.
JAILER: He escaped, He was a desperate fanatic, citizen. He gave me this wound. I fought with him, prepared to give my life to stop his escape. But he fought with the strength of ten men.
DOCTOR: Yes, yes, yes, I believe what you say. I'm sure you did the best you could. It's a pity you're surrounded by such fools.
JAILER: Exactly, citizen. Exactly.
DOCTOR: Yes. All three of them are somewhere in Paris.
JAILER: They will be caught, you may rest assured.
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes. What? Oh, of course. Yes, yes, of course, of course. Well, I'll take up no more of your time, citizen.
(The Doctor turns and sees LeMaitre)
JAILER: LeMaitre. The citizen here has been enquiring.
LEMAITRE: Yes, I heard what was said. Your papers, citizen?
JAILER: He's a regional officer from the southern province.
LEMAITRE: I can read, thank you, jailer. And where are you going now, citizen?
DOCTOR: Well, er, home.
LEMAITRE: It's rather late. It would perhaps be better if you journeyed tomorrow.
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, I could do that.
LEMAITRE: You see, I'm taking the execution lists to the first deputy's palace and, by a coincidence if you like, your province is going to be discussed. It would be a great help if you were on hand to answer any difficult questions that crop up.
DOCTOR: A great help. Very well.
LEMAITRE: I promise you will find it most interesting. Come. We must not keep Citizen Robespierre waiting.

[Chez Jules]

LEON: Where do you come from, Barbara?
BARBARA: Does it matter?
LEON: No. I'd just like to know.
BARBARA: I don't think you'll like the answer. I was born in England, so that makes us enemies.
LEON: Does it? I prefer to think that it means you have no interest in France or the Revolution.
BARBARA: That's a strange thing to say.
LEON: Perhaps I'll explain one day.
BARBARA: Well, I think I'd better go and see if Susan's all right.

[Jailer's office]

JAILER: I keep telling you. He's just left to see Citizen Robespierre. Are you sure it's so urgent? Well, what is it about?
TAILOR: I want to give him this.
JAILER: What is it?
TAILOR: Evidence against a traitor.
(The Doctor's ring)

Episode Four - The Tyrant of France

[Robespierre's office]

(Robespierre is sitting at his desk)
LEMAITRE [OC]: LeMaitre, to see Citizen Robespierre.
ROBESPIERRE: Send Citizen LeMaitre in.
LEMAITRE: Here is the complete and detailed list of the recent executions, Citizen.
ROBESPIERRE: Who is this, LeMaitre?
LEMAITRE: A Regional Deputy visiting from our southern province, Citizen. And as the province in question is to be discussed, I thought the Citizen could make his report personally.
ROBESPIERRE: I see. I am always prepared to listen to a first-hand account of a region's situation.
DOCTOR: I welcome the opportunity. Thank you. Before you question me, perhaps you would like to hear my views on Paris?
ROBESPIERRE: When did you arrive?
DOCTOR: Just today.
ROBESPIERRE: Hardly long enough for you to have gauged the present mood of our capital.
DOCTOR: Oh, I wouldn't say that.
ROBESPIERRE: I am only interested in your comments on your own territory. Recent memoranda from your province suggest that the purge of our enemies in your region is progressing very slowly.
DOCTOR: Oh, you've reached that conclusion. Hmm. Well, perhaps we have fewer enemies in our region, and it maybe that Paris can take an example from us, hmm?
ROBESPIERRE: We in Paris are aware of the danger, Citizen. We live in troubled times. There is much, much work to be done, work that is constantly delayed by the need to ferret out the traitors that we harbour in our midst.
DOCTOR: Is there such a need, Citizen Robespierre? Hmm? I mean, what can this reign of terror possibly gain? For every opponent you put to the guillotine, two more will spring up!
LEMAITRE: I think you have said enough, Citizen.
DOCTOR: Oh, you do, do you?
ROBESPIERRE: Let him speak, LeMaitre. What he said is true. My enemies do multiply. He is only warning me of the dangers I face.
LEMAITRE: As you wish, Citizen.
ROBESPIERRE: I could, and I shall, do great things for France. For too long the Nobility have kept our people to heel. And now finally, my world is at power, what happens? My colleagues, my trusted friends, plot for power.
DOCTOR: Do they? Or is it just their wish to keep their heads, hmm?
ROBESPIERRE: Danton planned to restore the monarchy. I had the proof, I knew! I had to dispose of him. And the Girondins. Even now, Convention members are at work, plotting my downfall. But I will triumph, even if I have to execute every last one of them! Death, always death. Do you think I want this carnage? Three hundred and forty two executions in nine days in Paris alone. What a memory I shall leave behind if this thing lasts. You must come again, Citizen. We never did talk about your province.
DOCTOR: No we didn't, did we, and I was so looking forward to it. It's a pity we talked for so long about Paris.
ROBESPIERRE: Bring him with you tomorrow, LeMaitre.
LEMAITRE: Yes, Citizen.

[Chez Jules]

(Susan is shivering under a blanket. Danielle brings her a brandy)
DANIELLE: This will warm you.
SUSAN: Thank you. What is it?
DANIELLE: Just drink it all up.
LEON: Would you like something, Barbara?
BARBARA: No, thank you.
LEON: I think I'd like some more wine.
DANIELLE: The wine is on the table.
LEON: Thank you,
DANIELLE: I think I'll return to bed, if you'll excuse me.
BARBARA: Yes, of course. I'm sorry we disturbed you.
(Danielle leaves)
LEON: One can't be friends with everybody.
BARBARA: How do you feel now?
SUSAN: I'm all right, thanks.
BARBARA: That's right. You try and get some rest. I'll be here if you want me. I wish I knew for certain what it was. She could have caught almost anything in that jail.
LEON: We've done all we can, Barbara.
BARBARA: Yes, but is it enough? When I went upstairs, she'd kicked off all her clothes and was shivering with cold. I was so worried, I thought I'd better bring her down here.
LEON: It's probably just a chill.
BARBARA: Yes, but what if it's worse?
LEON: Well, we could call a physician, but it would be dangerous. They report almost everything to the militia these days, if only to save their own necks.
BARBARA: Yes, well, that's a risk we'll have to take. You must know someone we could trust.
LEON: Yes. Yes, I think I do.
BARBARA: Good. That's settled then. She's asleep.
LEON: Good. I wonder what's happened to Jules? He should have been back before this.
BARBARA: Oh. Well, if you have to go, we'll be all right here.
LEON: Are you sure?
BARBARA: Yes, of course. I know you didn't intend to stay so long.
LEON: I think I'd better go. I shall need time to arrange for the physician.
BARBARA: We'll see you tomorrow?
LEON: If I can't come back, I'll send a message. You'll tell Jules?
BARBARA: Yes. And, be careful, Leon.
LEON: I will. We'll meet again, Barbara. And soon.
(Leon leaves and Susan wakes again)
BARBARA: I thought you were asleep.
SUSAN: No, just dozing.
BARBARA: Want to go back to bed now?
SUSAN: You like Leon, don't you?
BARBARA: Come on, I'll help you upstairs.
(Barbara and Susan leave)
(Later, Jean climbs in through the window, then helps Jules drag a body into the room)
JULES: Now, let's just have a look at him. It's a pity we had to hit him so hard.
JEAN: Well, the streets are filled with soldiers. He only had to call out and we'd have been arrested.
JULES: If he is against us, yes. I wonder who it is?
(it's Ian)

[Prison]

LEMAITRE: No, far from it. I'd say you created a favourable impression on Citizen Robespierre.
DOCTOR: I didn't say half the things I wanted to say. He twisted my words.
LEMAITRE: Politicians usually do. Still, you are going to have another opportunity.
DOCTOR: Oh, I think not. No, nom no, no. Your hospitality has been most successful, and most accepted. No, I think I must bid you goodbye and leave you.
LEMAITRE: That would be rather difficult, Citizen. Robespierre is expecting you tomorrow.
DOCTOR: Then convey my apologies to him.
LEMAITRE: On the contrary. It would be more than my neck is worth to disobey such an order. You must try and stay.
DOCTOR: It's out of the question!
LEMAITRE: Oh, but I insist. Jailer!
JAILER: LeMaitre.
LEMAITRE: Arrange suitable accommodation for our Citizen guest.
JAILER: Of course, Citizen, of course. For how long?
LEMAITRE: He will be staying at least until tomorrow night.
DOCTOR: Definitely no longer.
JAILER: He can have one of the soldiers' rooms. I'll throw them out. Oh, Citizen, just one thing. There's a man waiting to see you. It's very important.
LEMAITRE: I trust the room will be to your satisfaction.
DOCTOR: I'm sure it will be.

[LeMaitre's office]

(The tailor is waiting for him)
LEMAITRE: Well? You wanted to see me?
TAILOR: Yes, Citizen LeMaitre. I think I may have some information for you.

[Jailor's office]

JAILER: If you're ready, Citizen, I'll show you your room.
DOCTOR: Oh, that's alright, Jailer. I don't think I shall stay after all.
JAILER: Eh?
DOCTOR: No, I'm sure LeMaitre will understand. It's a pity that I asked him to put me up. Besides, those poor soldiers will need their rest.
JAILER: It doesn't matter about them.
DOCTOR: Nevertheless, I must be on my way. I have a long journey. So kindly give my regards to LeMaitre.
(The Jailor pulls a pistol)
JAILER: Citizen!
DOCTOR: And just what do you think you're doing, jailer? Hmm?
JAILER: LeMaitre said you are staying. I must obey him.
DOCTOR: And what do you think he'll say when he hears you delayed me, hmm?
JAILER: I'm sorry, Citizen, I'm sorry. But he comes back and finds you gone, it could be even worse.
DOCTOR: Very well, I'll stay then. And I shall say nothing of this disgraceful behaviour, if only for your sake.
JAILER: Thank you, Citizen, thank you. This way.

[LeMaitre's office]

LEMAITRE: Your story is that this white-haired old gentleman exchanged clothes and this ring, and that you also gave him writing material.
TAILOR: And the sash, Citizen. It was when he took the insignia of a Regional Officer of the Provinces that I became, well, suspicious.
LEMAITRE: Yes, so you said.
TAILOR: Of course I realise it may be nothing, but it was my duty to report it.
LEMAITRE: You did well, Citizen.
TAILOR: Will you be keeping the ring and the clothes, Citizen?
LEMAITRE: They may be needed as evidence.
TAILOR: Oh. Yes. Of course, you realise they were part of the exchange. I'm a poor man, Citizen, and normally I'd have thrown him out of my shop.
LEMAITRE: This should more than compensate.
(He gives the tailor a few coins)
TAILOR: Thank you, Citizen! Although I cannot accept a reward for what, after all, was my duty.
LEMAITRE: Keep it, on one condition.
TAILOR: Anything, Citizen.
LEMAITRE: You will say nothing of this to anyone.
TAILOR: You have my word.
LEMAITRE: Leave this way. I don't want you seen in the prison.
TAILOR: Thank you, Citizen, thank you.

[Chez Jules]

JULES: He's coming round.
(Barbara enters, but cannot see who is on the chaise)
JULES: I'm sorry we were so long, Barbara. We had to carry him all the way, dodging patrols all the time. How's Susan?
BARBARA: Oh, she has a slight fever, but she's sleeping now.
JULES: Leon not here?
BARBARA: No, he had to leave. He's arranging for Susan to see a doctor t (sees the newcomer) Ian!
IAN: Barbara!
BARBARA: Ian!
IAN: Is Susan here too?
BARBARA: Yes, she's upstairs.
IAN: But I thought you were both. Oh, this is great. Any news of the Doctor?
BARBARA: No. We don't even know if he got to Paris.
JULES: Well, we did not know when we left here we were going to collect one of your friends, Barbara.
BARBARA: Ian, this is Jules. He saved our lives.
IAN: Not Jules Renan, by any chance?
JULES: Yes?
IAN: What? I've been looking for you.
JULES: We heard that somebody was. We did not know it was you.
IAN: You can say that again.
JULES: We're very sorry about that. Jean, this calls for a celebration.
JEAN: I'll get a bottle from the cellar.
JULES: Come and sit over here, you'll be more comfortable.
BARBARA: I think I'd better go and sit with Susan.
IAN: Oh?
BARBARA: She isn't feeling at all well.
IAN: What's wrong with her?
BARBARA: Don't know. We're hoping to see a doctor tomorrow. Although when she hears you're back, that should be tonic enough.
JULES: I know it is good news, but I think it's best not to wake her.
BARBARA: Oh no, I won't. She doesn't sleep for very long anyway. Look, you have a talk to Ian.
(Barbara leaves)
IAN: Sounded like an order.
JULES: Well, there is one question I would like to ask you. How did you know Barbara and Susan were here?
IAN: I didn't.
JULES: But I thought when you were asking for me.
IAN: That was for an entirely different reason. Do you know a man called Webster?
JULES: No.
IAN: I shared a cell with him in prison. Unfortunately he died. He asked me to contact a man called James Stirling.
JULES: James Stirling. No, I'm afraid that name means nothing to me either.
IAN: What? You mean to say you don't know him?
JULES: No. Should I?
IAN: Well, I don't know. I somehow took it for granted that you would.
JULES: Perhaps you'd better tell me the complete story.
IAN: Yes.
JULES: Over a glass of wine.
IAN: Well, as far as I know, Webster was an Englishman who'd come over to France to persuade Stirling to return to England. Stirling must be a spy.
JEAN: I'll share one drink, then I must start my journey.
JULES: Thank you. Yes, you should leave before dawn. Your health, Ian.
IAN: Well, as I told you, Webster was dying. But before he died, he begged me to get a message to James Stirling. I asked him, how would I recognise him? And he told me to contact you at the sign of Le Chien Gris.
JEAN: I see. Well, Webster is right there. It is an inn that we frequent. I'm sorry, please go on.
IAN: No, that's all there is to say. Except that, as I found Le Chien Gris, you found me.
JULES: Did Webster know Stirling?
IAN: Oh, I imagine so.
JEAN: Probably by sight.
JULES: But if as you say Stirling is a spy, to do his job properly he must be able to move around freely. That would mean an alias, a completely new identity.
IAN: What, something that Webster didn't know?
JULES: Yes, exactly.
IAN: So Webster was counting on recognising him?
JULES: Well, that makes good sense.
IAN: Yes, well why did he ask me to contact you?
JULES: Men like Webster have been in touch with me before. I imagine the English are giving me as a contact to people they send over in case they need help.
IAN: That's not going to help me find Stirling, is it?
JULES: What's the matter, eh?
JEAN: I'm not sure I like the idea of being used by the English. You shouldn't either, Jules. We're at war! And they're our enemies, and here we are helping their spies.
JULES: England is at war with the people ruling France, Jean. So are we. When the tyranny ends, so will the war.
IAN: I suppose the chances of finding Stirling are pretty slim.
JULES: We can try.
IAN: Good.
JEAN: Now, you have a few days to spare, if that's correct.
IAN: Oh, do I?
JULES: Oh, I'm sorry, I haven't told you. Jean is leaving soon to search for the fourth member of your party, Susan's grandfather.
IAN: You know where he is?
JULES: No, but he will start at the house where you were arrested and follow the trail from there, won't you, Jean?
JEAN: Yes, I will find him.
JULES: And while we wait, we will also search, for Stirling.
JEAN: Providing you have no objections, Jules, I'll start my journey now.
JULES: No objections.
JEAN: You'll hear from me within three days.
JULES: Take care, Jean.
JEAN: Ian.
IAN: Good luck, and thanks.
JULES: If anyone can find him, Jean can. Now to our problem. I wonder who can help us?
JEAN: Of course, there is one man.
JULES: Leon?
IAN: A friend of yours?
JULES: We've shared many escapades. He moves in a very wide circle and knows a great many people. Perhaps he is James Stirling?
(Jean leaves)
IAN: I'd like to meet him. Can you arrange it?
JULES: Very easily, he's coming here tomorrow, bringing a physician for Susan.
IAN: Good. This calls for another drink. Oh, Barbara, just in time.
JULES: Susan?
BARBARA: I'm afraid she's getting worse.

[Prison]

(Next day, the Doctor comes out of his room. The Jailor is still in a drunken stupor)
LEMAITRE: Good morning, Citizen. I hope you slept well?
DOCTOR: I did not! The bed was hard, and the draught blew through the room like the north wind.
LEMAITRE: I'm sorry.
DOCTOR: Yes, I dare say you are, but if I catch rheumatism, apologies won't cure it. Will it, hmm?
JAILER: Better feed the pigs.
(The Jailer leaves)
DOCTOR: Most appropriate.
LEMAITRE: Come, we'll have breakfast. And your time may not be wasted, Citizen. I've got a feeling that it will be quite an eventful day.

{Chez Jules]

DANIELLE: A message from Leon. The physician won't come here.
JULES: Thank you.
IAN: But we must do something for Susan.
JULES: Well, if Danielle says the physician won't come here, Susan must be taken to him, that's all.
DANIELLE: I'll arrange for a carriage to take them.
(Danielle leaves)
IAN: Let me go with Susan.
JULES: No, I think it'll look less suspicious if two women were to go. Yes, the physician is reasonably near. Yes, Barbara can take her.
IAN: I've just found them. I don't want to lose them again.
JULES: That's quite understandable. But there's no reason for you to fear for your safety. Besides, there's your meeting with Leon.
IAN: Yes, but you haven't arranged it yet.
JULES: I can. Ian, it'll all be over by today. You'll be able to leave together. It'll be quicker this way.
IAN: Well, I don't like it this way, but.
JULES: Good. I'll go and fetch Barbara and Susan.
IAN: Let's hope we can trust the physician.

[Consulting room]

(An hour later, Susan is being examined by a physician)
PHYSICIAN: Yes, you appear to have a feverish chill, but it's nothing very serious.
BARBARA: Well, that's a relief.
PHYSICIAN: All the same, I'm surprised at your condition. Tell me, have you any idea how you came to catch it?
SUSAN: No, none.
PHYSICIAN: Your symptoms would suggest that you haven't been looking after yourself.
SUSAN: Well, I've done nothing unusual.
PHYSICIAN: Has she been eating properly?
BARBARA: She has an enormous appetite. Look, doctor, if you could, well, give her something? We appreciate your time's valuable. We've no wish to delay you.
PHYSICIAN: Quite so, quite so. There's another thing, your, er, your hands. They're very blistered, aren't they?
SUSAN: We've been doing some gardening.
BARBARA: Doctor, can you help her?
PHYSICIAN: Yes, I'll treat her. It's a simple matter of blood-letting. Unfortunately, I shall have to go out and collect some leeches. You called rather early; I was on my way to collect them first thing this morning. But you're welcome to wait.
BARBARA: Well, maybe it would be better if we came back.
PHYSICIAN: Come back? No, no, no. I shall be out all day. You'll have to wait. But please, make yourselves comfortable.
(the physician leaves)
SUSAN: Barbara, I don't like him, and I can't stand the thought of having leeches on me.
BARBARA: I know, and I got the impression that he suspected us. Come on, let's go.
SUSAN: It's locked!

[Prison]

(the Jailer is mobilising some soldiers to check out the physician's story)
JAILER: Get a move on. They'll be out of Paris if you don't hurry up!
PHYSICIAN: If I'm wrong, there'll be no repercussions, will there, Citizen?
JAILER: Don't worry. From what you've told me, it's the escaped prisoners alright. The soldiers will go with you. All you've got to do is to point them out.
PHYSICIAN: Yes, yes, I'd better hurry back.
JAILER: Go with the physician. Right turn. Quick march.

[Consulting room]

BARBARA: Oh, this door's stronger than it looks.
SUSAN: He's been gone ages. He'll be back soon. There's someone coming.
PHYSICIAN: There they are.
(The soldiers take Barbara and Susan away)

{Chez Jules]

IAN: Barbara and Susan aren't back yet.
JULES: They'll be all right. It is not unusual to be kept waiting at the physician.
IAN: Well, I've got a feeling something's gone wrong.
JULES: Now don't worry, Ian. I've arranged your meeting with Leon.
IAN: Oh, he can wait.
JULES: If it'll make you any happier, I'll go and fetch Barbara and Susan. Now if you want to see Leon, you must hurry. He moves around a great deal. It may be your only chance.
IAN: But you'll leave immediately?
JULES: Yes, of course I will. Leon is at a disused church. You're to go alone. I've explained some of the story.
IAN: Ah, so he's not James Stirling.
JULES: No. I'll draw a map for you, It will help you find the way.

[Prison]

JAILER: So, you thought you'd escaped. Well, we're not as big a fools as you take us for. Ah, LeMaitre. Two recaptured prisoners.
(LeMaitre has a private word with the jailer)
SUSAN: Barbara, what do you think they're talking about?
BARBARA: I don't know, but we'll find out soon enough.
JAILER: I'll see that your orders are carried out, Citizen. Take the girl to the cells.
SUSAN: No! Barbara!
JAILER: Not you. You're wanted for questioning.

{LeMaitre's office]

JAILER: Citizen LeMaitre thought you might like to question this prisoner.
DOCTOR: What's that?
BARBARA: Doctor?
DOCTOR: My dear Barbara!
BARBARA: Doctor!
(LeMaitre is listening outside the door)

[Church crypt]

(Thick Norman pillars offer plenty of hiding places)
IAN: Leon?
LEON: Yes. You must be Ian.
IAN: That's right.
LEON: Are you alone?
IAN: Yes. Jules said you might be able to help.
(Ian hears a noise, turns, and sees)
IAN: Soldiers.
LEON: Yes, I know. You walked right into my trap, didn't you, Ian?

Episode Five - A Bargain of Necessity

[Church crypt]

LEON: You can put all ideas of escape out of your head. And as for your rescue? Well, no one will come here, you can take my word for that.
IAN: If I don't go back, Jules is going to get suspicious.
LEON: By the time that happens, my friend, we shall have left. And afterwards we'll take care of him.
(The soldiers chain Ian to iron rings set in a pillar)
IAN: You never know who your friends are.
LEON: My association with Jules was bound to come to an end. He already suspected that a traitor, if you want to use those words, was working in the organisation. But it's no matter. We're ready now to close in on him, too.
IAN: So what do you want with me?
LEON: Information. You will cooperate, Ian. Think about it. We have plenty of time.
(Leon leaves)
SOLDIER: He's giving you time to consider.
IAN: I don't need time, I have no information.
SOLDIER: We'll decide that when you talk. And you'll talk. You'll talk.

{LeMaitre's office]

BARBARA: Oh, Doctor, I thought we were never going to see you again.
DOCTOR: You should know by now, young lady, that you can't get rid of the old Doctor as easily as that.

[Corridor]

(LeMaitre is listening to them through the door)
BARBARA [OC]: Tell me, how did you get out of that burning farmhouse? 
DOCTOR [OC]: Oh, never mind about that now.

{LeMaitre's office]

DOCTOR: What happened? Where's Susan? How is she?
BARBARA: She's here. We were arrested together.
DOCTOR: She's here?
BARBARA: Yes.
DOCTOR: Is she well?
BARBARA: Yes, she's fine. She had a slight fever, but she's recovered now.
DOCTOR: Good. Well now, we must find Chesterton and try and get back to the ship.
BARBARA: Oh, I know where he is.
DOCTOR: Hmm?
BARBARA: I know where he is.
DOCTOR: Oh yes?
BARBARA: We were all in hiding at a house owned by a Jules Renan.

[Corridor]

LEMAITRE: Not now, Jailer.
JAILER: But Citizen.
LEMAITRE: Later!
JAILER: But.
LEMAITRE: I said, not now.
JAILER: I've just had a message from the First Deputy, Citizen.
LEMAITRE: Well, what is it?
JAILER: Robespierre says he wants to see you immediately. It's a matter of the utmost importance. Robespierre said immediately, Citizen.
LEMAITRE: Yes, yes. Has the young girl been locked away?
JAILER: She has. I saw to it myself, just as you ordered, Citizen.
LEMAITRE: Good. She shall remain in her cell, do you understand? Under no circumstances is the door to be opened.
JAILER: Just as you say, Citizen.
LEMAITRE: And if that order is disobeyed, I'll have you guillotined. (LeMaitre leaves)

{LeMaitre's office]

DOCTOR: Yes, that's it! That's it!
BARBARA: Oh, I should never have taken Susan to see that physician.
DOCTOR: Oh, don't blame yourself, Barbara. As it happens, everything has turned out very well. Might have taken us ages to find each other.
BARBARA: Do you think we stand a chance of getting out of here?
DOCTOR: Well, my voice seems to carry some weight, hmm?
BARBARA: Yes, well, I'm not surprised in that get-up.
DOCTOR: Yes, it's rather impressive, isn't it? Now, listen. I'm going through that door. Give me a few minutes, then I want you to go through the door and straight out of the prison.
BARBARA: Are you serious?
DOCTOR: Absolutely serious, but I've no time to explain. Just do as you're asked.
BARBARA: What about Susan?
DOCTOR: Well, I'll look after her and follow later.
BARBARA: But Doctor, you
DOCTOR: Now, now, now, there's no buts. Don't argue. You know my plans always work perfectly. Hmm? In a few minutes, then.

[Jailer's office]

DOCTOR: Ah, tell me. Is LeMaitre here?
JAILER: He's left to see Citizen Robespierre.
DOCTOR: Oh, dear, dear, dear. How irritating. And I did want him so urgently.
JAILER: Well, I'm sure he'll be back shortly, Citizen.
DOCTOR: No, no, no, this matter can't wait. It's urgent. I've just been interrogating that young woman, and I'm convinced she's a member of that dangerous Traitor's Party.
JAILER: Oh, I see, I see.
DOCTOR: And do you know, she could tell us the names of every traitor in this country.
JAILER: Perhaps we should make her talk?
DOCTOR: No, no, chance of that. No, she'd rather die first than betray her friends. No, I think, if there's only some way of using her. If only we could get through her to her friends.
JAILER: Perhaps.
DOCTOR: Hmm?
JAILER: Perhaps.
DOCTOR: Perhaps what?
JAILER: Well, if she were to escape, she could be followed. She'd meet these traitors, then we'd arrest them. LeMaitre once did this.
DOCTOR: My dear, what an excellent idea! What an excellent idea! Yes, of course, now why didn't I think of that? Yes, that's what we'll do, and LeMaitre will be delighted! Now look here, Mister Jailer, I want you to open those prison doors. Keep out of sight.
JAILER: Oh, but, er
DOCTOR: Tch, tch, tch. No buts, no! And sooner or later, that young woman will come through those doors and we can grab her. Go along, quickly.
(Barbara comes out of the office, sees everything is clear, and walks out of the prison)

{Chez Jules]

JULES: Ian, Barbara, Susan? Ian? Ian?

[Church crypt]

SOLDIER: Getting impatient, are we? That's a good sign. Citizen Colbert really knows how to make pigs like you talk. He leaves them alone, lets them think. Now me, I have other ways.
LEON: Stop that. I'm sorry. I'm afraid my men are very bad-tempered. Ian, I don't want anything to happen to you really, but I think you have the information that will help the cause I believe in.
IAN: You're wasting your time with me. I'm very small fry.
LEON: Surely you don't expect me to believe that? We learned of the existence of James Stirling two months ago. We've been searching for him ever since.
IAN: We?
LEON: Yes. I've been loyal to the Revolution from the beginning. If you'd known what France was like six years ago, before the Bastille, you'd understand.
IAN: I do understand, but I can't help you.
LEON: Or you won't. France will never be anything until we're rid of these high-born leeches who've been sucking the life-blood of France for so long.
IAN: You must believe me, I can help you in no way.
LEON: Ian. You can save yourself a lot of trouble and suffering by talking. This is your only chance! Do you realise that when I've finished with you I'll transfer you to the prison, and then to the guillotine? Now, if you were to talk, I have the power to set you free.
IAN: Jules must have told you all I know.
LEON: Ah yes, what did Jules say? That Webster gave you a message to give to Stirling.
IAN: Yes, that's right. Only I can't recognise Stirling. That's why I'm here.
LEON: Oh, that I accept. But you must have known of their organisation. You were in it with Webster. He would never have trusted you otherwise. Now, who sent you from England? How did you get here, and who helped you?
IAN: What's the use?
LEON: I really don't understand what you hope to gain. If I don't get the information from you, I shall find it elsewhere. Now be sensible. Save yourself from the guillotine.
IAN: You wouldn't believe my story anyway.
LEON: Suppose you let me be the judge of that. How did you get to France?
IAN: You really want to know, eh?
LEON: The truth?
IAN: Oh yes, it's the truth all right.
LEON: You swear it?
IAN: Yes, I swear it. I flew here with three friends in a small box. When I left England it was 1963.
(Leon signals a soldier to bayonet Ian, but just then)
JULES: All right, Leon. Release him.
(Jules shoots one soldier, then throws the empty pistol at Leon, knocking him down. Ian kicks the second musket away before the soldier can fire, and Jules is able to grab the soldier. Ian sees Leon get up with two pistols of his own)
IAN: Jules!
(Jules turns with the solder as a shield, and both Leon's shots hit the solder instead. As Jules makes for the musket, Jules draws his second pistol)
JULES: You traitor. It's you who's the enemy of the people.
(Jules kills Leon Colbert and frees Ian)
IAN: I thought I was going mad when I saw you here. Why did you come?
JULES: Bad news for you.
IAN: Oh?
JULES: Barbara and Susan were arrested at the physician.
IAN: Yes, I feared that as soon as Leon turned up here. We must get to them.
JULES: I think it's best to go back to my hide-out.
IAN: What? The soldiers will be there already.
JULES: Well, if I know Leon, he will have wanted the satisfaction of arresting me himself. And anyway, we'll just have to risk it. Come on.

[Susan's cell]

(there's a tapping at the door)
SUSAN: What is it? What do you want?
DOCTOR: Susan, Susan, it's me, child! Me!
SUSAN: Oh, Grandfather! Oh, Grandfather, you've found us! Well, how'd you get away from the farmhouse?
DOCTOR: Oh, I can't explain that now, child, it'd take too long.
SUSAN: Oh, Barbara's here somewhere.
DOCTOR: Yes, well, I've taken care of that. She should be out of the prison and well on her way now. And I. Shh! There's someone coming! Quiet! See you later. Shh! SUSAN: Be careful!
DOCTOR: Shh!

[Jailer's office]

JAILER: But Citizen!
DOCTOR: Hmm?
JAILER: Didn't you collect the soldiers and follow the released prisoner?
DOCTOR: Me? Certainly not!
JAILER: But, whatever, why not?
DOCTOR: But I was under the impression, my dear man, that you were doing so. I'm hardly dressed in the proper clothes to go skulking after people, now am I?
JAILER: I couldn't have gone. I can't leave the prison.
DOCTOR: Well why didn't you say that in the first place? Well, did you?
JAILER: No, Citizen.
DOCTOR: No, and what do you think LeMaitre will say? He's bound to want to know whose idea it was.
JAILER: It was mine. Citizen, you must help me.
DOCTOR: I'll try. Now, don't worry, I'll cover up for you. But you know, I have a feeling that this young girl is tied up in this somehow. Now I think if we let her go, I personally could follow, and then arrest all of them. All I need from you is the key to that child's cell.
JAILER: Citizen, LeMaitre was very clear with his instructions. If that door is opened, I lose my head. That's what, what LeMaitre said just before he left, that's what he said.
DOCTOR: LeMaitre, LeMaitre. Why can't you use your own initiative, my man?
JAILER: Aye, well you must see him when he returns, Citizen. I'm just a humble servant. If his orders are countermanded, well then.
DOCTOR: I demand you open that cell door!
JAILER: To lose one prisoner is bad enough, to lose two would be the end of me. Especially after my orders. LeMaitre will be returning soon. We'll do as he says. Until then, that door remains closed.

[Robespierre's office]

ROBESPIERRE: Ah good, LeMaitre. We are not to be disturbed. The news is serious, Citizen, and there is not much time.
LEMAITRE: I am at your service. You have only to give the order.
ROBESPIERRE: There is a meeting of the Convention tomorrow.
LEMAITRE: Yes, I know, Citizen.
ROBESPIERRE: I have been warned that certain influential Members, traitors, all of them, are planning to bring an indictment against another Member.
LEMAITRE: You have their names?
ROBESPIERRE: Oh, I realise they are forever plotting, but this latest information suggests that more and more of the Paris Commune are taking sides. The plan is that even I shall not be allowed to speak. They're out to destroy me.
LEMAITRE: All is not lost, Citizen. You still have many friends sitting in the Convention.
ROBESPIERRE: But can I trust them? If this motion gets underway, they will turn against me to save their own necks. Mark my words, LeMaitre. If this plot is successful, tomorrow, the 27th of July 1794, will be a date for history.
LEMAITRE: Tell me the leader of this group, Citizen. He will be immediately executed.
ROBESPIERRE: Patience, LeMaitre. This is no lone voice we are fighting against. If they are to hold power, they will need the Army on their side. Meetings must have been arranged.
LEMAITRE: By whom?
ROBESPIERRE: It is my guess that Deputy Paul Barrass is at the forefront of the rebels, but I must be certain before I strike. I shall not get a second chance, LeMaitre.
LEMAITRE: Tell me what I must do.
ROBESPIERRE: I understand that Barrass is leaving Paris tonight. I assume it must be for a meeting. With the position as it is, it can be for no other reason. I want to know who with, and the decision. Given that, I can still defeat my enemies.
LEMAITRE: What if he's just a decoy?
ROBESPIERRE: That is my worry, LeMaitre. Tonight my men will be everywhere. Barrass is your responsibility.
LEMAITRE: I shall not fail you. Against which Member is the indictment being brought, Citizen?
ROBESPIERRE: Against me, LeMaitre! Against me, Robespierre!
(outside, LeMaitre has a whispered conversation with a guard)

{Chez Jules]

JULES: Leon was right. He did not tell me about this place. We're safe here for the moment. But I shall have to give up this house very soon. It's becoming too dangerous.
IAN: Barbara! We thought you'd been arrested.
BARBARA: Yes, we were, but when we got to the prison, the Doctor was there.
IAN: What?
BARBARA: Yes, he's dressed up as if he was running the revolution! From what I could gather, half the people there take orders from him.
IAN: That sounds like the Doctor, all right.
JULES: The Doctor? You mean Susan's grandfather?
BARBARA: Yes, that's right.
IAN: And where's Susan?
BARBARA: Oh, she'll be along later with him. I just walked out.
IAN: Walked out? But. I don't know how he gets away with it half the time. What did he say?
BARBARA: Well, not very much, we didn't have a chance. But he'll be here soon, so no doubt we'll get the whole story, several times. What have you done?
IAN: Oh, it's nothing much. Let's just say I fell into the wrong hands, and Jules arrived in time.
BARBARA: And Leon?
JULES: He's dead, Barbara. I killed him.
BARBARA: Killed him?
JULES: Yes. He was the traitor we were looking for.
IAN: It was the only way, Barbara.
JULES: He deserved to die. He was a traitor.
BARBARA: What do you mean, he was a traitor?
IAN: When I got to the church, he turned on me. He was going to kill me.
JULES: He betrayed us, Barbara.
BARBARA: He was a traitor to you. To his side he was a patriot.
IAN: Barbara, we've taken sides just by being here. Jules actually shot him. It could just as easily have been me.
JULES: And what about Robespierre? I suppose you think
BARBARA: Well just because an extremist like Robespierre
IAN: Oh, Barbara, Jules is our friend. He saved our lives!
BARBARA: I know all that! The revolution isn't all bad, and neither are the people who support it. It changed things for the whole world, and good, honest people gave their lives for that change.
IAN: Well, he got what he deserved.
BARBARA: You check your history books, Ian, before you decide what people deserve.

[Susan's cell]

DOCTOR: Susan.
SUSAN: Oh, Grandfather! I thought you were never coming.
DOCTOR: I shall have you out of here soon, but I must have your help. Now look, I want you to get down onto the floor, behind this door, and don't move, whatever you do!
SUSAN: Grandfather.
DOCTOR: Do it now, child. Don't argue, do it now. And don't make a sound! Stay there! There's someone coming.
SUSAN: Be careful!
DOCTOR: Yes, yes, don't fuss.
(The Doctor checks that there is no one else around)

[Jailer's office]

JAILER: Oh, it'll be the end of me, this business. I don't know what LeMaitre will say.
DOCTOR: Oh, he's not back yet then, eh?
JAILER: Oh, but we expect him any minute, and then
DOCTOR: Hmm. Jailer! Jailer! That young girl, she's gone!
JAILER: What?
DOCTOR: She's gone!

[Corridor outside Susan's cell]

JAILER: She's gone!
(as he fumbles for his keys the Doctor knocks him out with his own bottle and frees Susan)
DOCTOR: Come along, child, quickly!
(but they run straight into LeMaitre)
LEMAITRE: Guards! Guards!
(they are surrounded by soldiers)
JAILER: He tricked me, Citizen. He tricked me!
LEMAITRE: Lock her away.
JAILER: He did as you said 'e would, Citizen. He tried to get the young girl released, and he let the other prisoner go.
DOCTOR: Oh, spare your breath, please! I'm quite capable of explaining the situation myself.
LEMAITRE: All right, Jailer. I think it's about time we had a talk.
(Susan is taken back to her cell)

{LeMaitre's office]

DOCTOR: I must insist that you release that young child immediately!
LEMAITRE: I'm afraid you're not in a position to insist on anything at the moment.
DOCTOR: Position, sir? Do you realise who you're talking to?
LEMAITRE: Not yet. But I intend to find out. Do you recognise this, Citizen?
(It's the Doctor's signet ring)
DOCTOR: No. Should I?
(LeMaitre produces the Doctor's original clothes.)
LEMAITRE: And these. They're yours, aren't they? Given in exchange for those rather splendid clothes and the insignia of a Regional Provincial Deputy.
DOCTOR: Do you know that's the biggest fairy story I've ever heard in my life.
LEMAITRE: I could have had you arrested any time I wanted!
DOCTOR: Yes. Why didn't you? (puts the ring on his finger)
LEMAITRE: Please, please, keep it. Why didn't I? Well, with the political situation as it is, and my position being what it is, I need friends even if they're enemies. People I can call on for help. If I have something on them, so much the better.
DOCTOR: It's become quite obvious to me why you didn't wish me to leave the prison.
LEMAITRE: I knew I'd never see you again if you did.
DOCTOR: But you relaxed the regulations today, and I could have walked out any time I wished.
LEMAITRE: And left your granddaughter? Just an assumption, but obviously correct. I knew I had you so long as she remained here under lock and key. If you remember, when I first met you, you were enquiring after your friends. The young woman, whom the jailer says you've just released, the girl and, what was his name? Ian.
DOCTOR: So you knew all the time?
LEMAITRE: Let's just say I added to my knowledge. Listening at doors can still be effective.
DOCTOR: What do you want?
LEMAITRE: Ah. So I see we understand each other. If you agree to help me, your granddaughter will be released after you have kept your side of the bargain.
DOCTOR: The least I can do is listen.
LEMAITRE: Good. Now, I'm reasonably certain that your group are working with, or for, Jules Renan. I think you used his hideout. Certainly you know where it is, and if you don't, your granddaughter does.
DOCTOR: I have never met the man! Oh, I fully appreciate why you must want to find him, but if you think that I am going to betray him, then you are a very poor judge of character.
LEMAITRE: If you want your granddaughter released, you will have to take me to his hideout.
DOCTOR: Never, sir, I refuse!
LEMAITRE: I repeat. if you want your granddaughter released, you do not have a choice!

{Chez Jules]

BARBARA: Where's Jules?
IAN: He went to the end of the street, to look for Susan and the Doctor.
BARBARA: Well, the Doctor would have to wait for the right moment.
IAN: Yes, but how long can we wait?
BARBARA: Oh, I don't know. Whenever somebody passes the house, I think it might be them.
IAN: Yes, I know. Barbara. Sorry about Leon, but it really was the only way, believe me.
BARBARA: I know. I wanted to apologise to Jules. I'm so sick and tired of death, Ian. We never seem able to get away from it.
JULES: There is no way, Barbara. Well, there's no sign of your friends.
BARBARA: Well, we must wait a little longer.
JULES: I left the door unlatched.
IAN: Oh, so now anyone can walk in.
JULES: Try and be patient, Ian. Oh, I know these long hours of waiting only too well. I've had my share.
BARBARA: Jules, when I spoke to you before, I. The things I said.
JULES: You said because of Leon the man. Yes, I know. But I did what I had to do because of what he represents. Do you ever wonder why I'm doing these things, hiding in shadows, fighting in corners?
IAN: We took it for granted you belonged to the other side, the aristocracy.
JULES: No. No, I have no title or position. I belong, well, in the middle. But I hate to see order thrown out of the window like so much dust. There can be no loyalty or honour where anarchy prevails.
BARBARA: And Leon was your friend.
JULES: There are only two sides today, Barbara. Those who rule by fear and treachery, and those who fight for reason and justice. Anyone who betrays these principles is worse than the devil in hell!
IAN: Here they are.
(The Doctor enters, followed by)
BARBARA: LeMaitre.
JULES: Your friend has betrayed us!

Episode Six - Prisoners of the Conciergerie

[Chez Jules]

IAN: You brought the soldiers!
LEMAITRE: No, I came alone and unarmed. Ask your friend.
DOCTOR: We came alone, my boy. We made a bargain. Let him speak. He holds Susan prisoner.
JULES: What can you have to say to us?
LEMAITRE: Please, I come as a friend.
BARBARA: A friend?
LEMAITRE: Ian will tell you that what I say is true.
IAN: I will?
LEMAITRE: Well, surely you realise that your escape from prison was arranged? I saw to it that you got the key and I took care of the jailer.
IAN: Why? Why should you do that?
LEMAITRE: I was certain in my own mind that Webster gave you a message to deliver. You had to have the opportunity to deliver it. Unfortunately, I don't have enough time to wait now. I have to collect.
BARBARA: Collect?
LEMAITRE: Yes. I am James Stirling.
IAN: Stirling? You?
STIRLING: Is it so surprising? You must have already decided that to be of any use I would have to hold some position of authority.
JULES: Why have you not made yourself known here before? Webster had been told about me.
STIRLING: I've been in France several years. When I came over you must have been unknown to us, although I'm not sure I would have contacted you even if I could. I prefer to work alone.
IAN: You could have made yourself known to me in prison.
STIRLING: Yes, but I didn't know whether I could trust you. There again, I could have been overheard. No, Ian, I took the only course possible.
DOCTOR: That's all very well, LeMaitre, Stirling, or whatever your name is, but the only reason I brought you here was to help Susan. And I've kept my part of the bargain.
STIRLING: I know, but let me explain my position.
DOCTOR: I certainly will not! I want my granddaughter out of that prison!
STIRLING: She already has been out of that prison and she was rearrested. I will help you if you will help me. Don't you see? I can use my authority to get safe passage for all of you to wherever you want to go.
DOCTOR: But look here.
IAN: He's right, Doctor.
STIRLING: No harm will come to Susan, I promise. I gave orders that she was to remain in the cell. Now you know that's true. The jailer would die rather than see that cell door opened again.
DOCTOR: Very well. Very well. If you must, tell your story then get on with it.
STIRLING: First, the message.
IAN: Oh, Webster said very little. He was badly wounded as you know.
STIRLING: Yes. I know that. I read reports of all arrests in case something like this happens. It's why I came to your cell, I realised that he could have been Webster. I've been expecting to be contacted for months.
IAN: He didn't know where you were, or even where I could find you.
STIRLING: No. The plan was that he was to look for and recognise me. He was a good friend. Ian, the message?
IAN: He said you were to return to England immediately. It seems that whatever information you have is wanted there urgently.
STIRLING: Nothing more?
IAN: That was all Webster said.
STIRLING: Are you sure?
IAN: Well, he mumbled occasionally. Odd words. But what I've just told you was all he asked me to tell you.
STIRLING: What were these mumblings about?
IAN: Oh, well, they didn't really make sense. He was unconscious. He said strange things. I can't really remember now.
STIRLING: He may have realised that he didn't have very much time.
IAN: Yes. I'm afraid I can't remember them.
STIRLING: Well, I'm already planning my return to England, but before I go, and before I can give Susan and you safe passage, there is one more piece of information I must have.
BARBARA: But you asked for our help. What can we do? You have all the power.
STIRLING: Robespierre sent for me today. There is another plot to depose him.
JULES: Good. Will it succeed, do you think?
STIRLING: Possibly. He gave orders that I should follow Paul Barrass, a deputy, and report back on a meeting.
IAN: Barrass. Meeting. Webster did speak of that.
STIRLING: What did he say?
IAN: Well, nothing specific but he said Barrass, meeting, and something about a sinking ship. No. No, The Sinking Ship. That was it!
JULES: Just a moment. There's an inn called the Sinking Ship on the Calais Road. It would be ideal for a secret meeting.
STIRLING: Right. Better than following him, we can plan a reception committee. If I can discover the results of this meeting, I'm ready to return to England and I'm free to help you.
BARBARA: Have you any idea who Barrass is meeting?
STIRLING: No, but whoever he is, he could be the next ruler of France.
IAN: I still don't understand why you need our help.
STIRLING: Barrass knows me by sight, I'm sure of that. He could even know of you, Doctor. Now my plan, if you agree, is for Barbara and Ian to attend the meeting.
DOCTOR: Nonsense! It's far too risky.
JULES: Why not use your own men? You would still learn the details.
STIRLING: True but then they would also know and they may talk. Then I have no advantage.
BARBARA: I think we should go. Ian?
IAN: It's risky, but we're not going to get away without help.
DOCTOR: Quite so, and there's Susan to think about.
STIRLING: Then you agree to go?
BARBARA: Yes.
IAN: We agree.
STIRLING: The Doctor and I will remain here. If we're seen it could hinder you, or worse.
JULES: I'll take them to the inn, Stirling, if you've no objection.
STIRLING: Good. I was going to ask you to. Now, when you get there I suggest that the innkeeper.
JULES: You can leave it to us, Stirling.
STIRLING: Sorry. I know I can. You should have little difficulty getting there tonight. Stay the night and return here tomorrow morning. That way you won't run into any patrols. Now, where exactly is this inn, Jules?
JULES: It's a good two hours ride. We'll take the Calais road and ride due north. When we reach this fork we'll see a forest. We'll circle it and ride west.

[The Sinking Ship - bar]

(The full moon disappears behind storm clouds. Barbara is masquerading as a waitress as Jules sits near the door JULES: Thank you.
BARBARA: Well, if this is a typical night's trade, I'm not surprised this place was chosen.
JULES: I've bound and gagged the innkeeper and left him in the wine cellar. He'll be found when we leave.
BARBARA: Ian's nearly finished.
JULES: Good.
BARBARA: You know, if Barrass doesn't arrive soon, he'll find the place closed.
JULES: Perhaps that's what he's waiting for.
(Barbara notices a wine bottle being rattled by an awl sticking through the wall. She moves the bottle then goes to the next room)

[The Sinking Ship - back room]

BARBARA: You're through.
IAN: Yes, I know. That'll do it. Many out there?
BARBARA: Just two. They look set for the night. Oh, and Jules of course. He's put the innkeeper in the cellar.
IAN: Good. Yes, looks all right. Aye. Now we're ready for them.
(Spy hole complete, Ian arranges items on the shelf to disguise it)

[The Sinking Ship - bar]

(Jules signals with his pipe that Barrass is entering)
IAN: Ah, let me take your cloak, Citizen. Horrible night.
BARRASS: Where is Jacques?
IAN: Ah, Jacques? Oh, he's sick. He asked me to help him out. You must be the citizen who ordered the room. This way. This way, citizen. Here we are.

[The Sinking Ship - back room]

BARBARA: Can I get you anything, Citizen?
BARRASS: Yes. Some wine.
BARBARA: How many guests are you expecting?
BARRASS: Just the one.
(Barbara leaves)

[The Sinking Ship - bar]

BARBARA: There'll only be two of them.
(Barbara takes a bottle and two glasses into the back. The other bar patrons leave)
IAN: Goodnight!
CITIZEN: Goodnight!
(Jules goes out to stop any more unwanted customers)
IAN: As soon as his guest comes you can lock up.
(a coach draws up and a man in uniform goes straight through to the back room)
BARBARA: Did you see who it was?
IAN: No. Did you?
BARBARA: No.

[The Sinking Ship - back room]

BARRASS: Well, I'm delighted you could get here, General.
(the General checks no one is eavesdropping on them)

[The Sinking Ship - bar]

IAN: Barbara. Barbara. It's Napoleon. Napoleon Bonaparte!

[The Sinking Ship - back room]

BARRASS: We're quite safe here. I made certain I wasn't followed.
NAPOLEON: The meeting place was well chosen.
BARRASS: I, er, assume from your presence here that you're interested in my proposition.
NAPOLEON: Interested, obviously. But, no more. At least, not until you disclose the full details.
BARRASS: Robespierre will be arrested after tomorrow's convention meeting.
NAPOLEON: Will be? It won't be the first attempt.
BARRASS: But it will be the successful one. He'll be tried and executed before his friends have time to reorganise.
NAPOLEON: You make it sound simple, Barrass. I think you underestimate Robespierre. He has a talent for commanding support.
BARRASS: Only if he is allowed to speak. And he won't be able to.
NAPOLEON: As far as I'm concerned, your success or failure means very little to me.
BARRASS: Oh, possibly, but only for the immediate future. Success could well mean that I would take control of the governing committee.
NAPOLEON: It would be within the constitutional rights?
BARRASS: And then the constitution could be amended. Oh, I'm well aware of your disgust for politicians, tearing France to pieces while her enemies wait to pounce.
NAPOLEON: Exactly what is your proposal?
BARRASS: I believe that to rule a country successfully, one needs a certain support from the people being governed.
NAPOLEON: Agreed. And how do you plan to raise that support?
BARRASS: With you. Your victories, inspiring victories, in the Austrian Wars have made you a public figure. You're a hero in the people's eyes.
NAPOLEON: And in your eyes? A useful prop for your new government.
BARRASS: Oh, come, general. You would be more than just a figurehead.
NAPOLEON: Yes, I know I would. I'm glad you appreciate it. In which capacity would you require me to serve?
(Ian and Barbara are listening through the spy hole Ian made earlier)
BARRAS: The constitution amendment would call for a government of three consuls. You would be one of them.
NAPOLEON: When would you require my decision?
BARRASS: Now.
NAPOLEON: If I refuse?
BARRASS: You're in a strong position, Bonaparte, but hardly indispensible. There are other young men equally ambitious.
NAPOLEON: I accept, dependent on Robespierre's downfall. In the event of failure, I shall of course deny this meeting ever took place.
BARRASS: I will summon you to Paris as soon as a suitable time has elapsed.
NAPOLEON: I shall be ready to take over.

[Chez Jules]

(Next morning, Ian and Barbara report their findings)
STIRLING: Napoleon? Napoleon as ruler of France?
BARBARA: Yes. As one of three consuls.
STIRLING: He won't be content with that. I've watched his promotions. Bonaparte's clever and ambitious. If he gets a foothold to power, one day he will rule France.
DOCTOR: Our only concern now is Susan.
STIRLING: She's only part of it, Doctor. If they take Robespierre to the prison we might find it hard to get in there, let alone get out.
IAN: You made a bargain with us.
STIRLING: And I'll keep to it.
IAN: You knew this might happen.
STIRLING: Yes. But I had no idea Barrass was so strong. Jules. What time is this convention meeting?
JULES: It will be over by now.
STIRLING: Then Robespierre could already be under arrest. I must find out. There may still be time.
BARBARA: You'd keep Robespierre as ruler of France?
STIRLING: If I thought it was the only way to
JULES: We need a strong government, but not a military dictatorship. And it could happen.
BARBARA: It will happen.
DOCTOR: Oh, save your breath, my dear. Do as you think fit. I'm going off for Susan.
STIRLING: Doctor?
DOCTOR: Hmm?
STIRLING: Take Barbara with you. Let her hide outside the prison. Jules?
JULES: Yes?
STIRLING: Get a carriage. Take her to the prison. If there are crowds, wait until they disperse. Barbara will watch out for you.
JULES: Right.
STIRLING: If you can get Susan, take her and join Barbara and wait for the carriage. Ian and myself will join you as soon as we can.
IAN: Where shall we go?
STIRLING: To the palace. We'll get news of Robespierre. If you're not outside the prison when we return, I'll come for you.
DOCTOR: Go with him, my boy. You can't help me but at least you can make sure that he helps us.
IAN: All right. I'll see you outside the prison. Good luck.
BARBARA: Take care, Ian.
DOCTOR: What is it? What do you find so amusing, hmm?
BARBARA: Oh, I don't know. Yes, I do. It's this feverish activity to try and stop something that we know is going to happen. Robespierre will be guillotined whatever we do.
DOCTOR: I've told you of our position so often.
BARBARA: Yes, I know. You can't influence or change history. I learnt that lesson with the Aztecs.
DOCTOR: The events will happen, just as they are written. I'm afraid so and we can't stem the tide. But at least we can stop being carried away with the flood! Now, Susan and the prison.

[Robespierre's office]

(Robespierre gets a pistol from his desk and bolts the doors. Outside, a group of soldiers are after his blood. They break the door down)
SOLDIER: A warrant for your arrest, Citizen. Issued by the governing committee.
ROBESPIERRE: Oh, don't be fools, citizens! They're traitors, all of them. Traitors! Don't be fools, they're just using you. They'll never succeed in taking over the government of France! They'll never succeed! Within hours I shall be as powerful as ever I was and the traitors will pay with their lives!

[Outside Robespierre's office]

(Ian and Stirling arrive)
ROBESPIERRE [OC]: If, citizens, you swear your allegiance to me now, I will promise your safety. I promise to save France. I will promise! (a gunshot silences the rhetoric)
SOLDIER [OC]: Ha! That'll keep you quiet for a while. No more talk out of him. Come on, Citizen, to the prison.
(Robespierre is dragged out, bleeding)
STIRLING: You should have let me go in, Ian.
IAN: No, Stirling. Robespierre's finished. We were too late.
STIRLING: Yes. Did you hear the men? They're taking him to the prison.
IAN: Yes. It's up to the Doctor now.

[Opposite the Prison]

(The Doctor and Barbara are sheltering from the rain)
DOCTOR: I think we're going to have quite a storm.
BARBARA: Yes. We were lucky to find shelter so near the prison.
DOCTOR: Hmm. We've waited around here long enough. It's far too conspicuous. I think the carriage might be here when I return. Will you be all right?
BARBARA: Yes, of course.
DOCTOR: I think I'll go and get Susan, or at least try. Be careful.

[Jailer's office]

(the jailer is drinking with several guards)
JAILER: Up with the Revolution. You! You came back.
DOCTOR: I can see you did not expect me.
JAILER: No, but I am glad you came. I still have a score to settle with you.
DOCTOR: Really? I see you haven't heard the news yet, my man.
JAILER: Who hasn't? Robespierre has been overthrown!
DOCTOR: Yes. And LeMaitre was shot trying to run away.
JAILER: LeMaitre, shot?
DOCTOR: Shot. And now we're going to deal with his accomplices.
JAILER: Who are you?
DOCTOR: Why do you think a high-ranking official like myself came to Paris, hmm? I was part of the plan. I came to make sure of Robespierre's downfall.
JAILER: I didn't know, Citizen.
DOCTOR: No, you didn't, did you? And that is why you didn't expect me to come back. You thought you'll get away with it.
JAILER: Get away with what?
DOCTOR: Being LeMaitre's accomplice. Take him! You were LeMaitre's accomplice, weren't you? You did help him to carry out his torturous actions?
JAILER: I only carried out the orders I was given, Citizen.
DOCTOR: Orders? Orders? Don't tell me that, my man, I was there, remember? I saw you conniving with him all the time.
JAILER: I didn't, Citizen.
DOCTOR: Didn't what?
JAILER: Do what you just said.
DOCTOR: It was you that betrayed me to LeMaitre, was it not?
JAILER: Well, after all, Citizen, you did hit me on the head. And how was I to know LeMaitre was a traitor? And, well, you, Citizen, you, well, that was a secret wasn't it?
DOCTOR: Well, I suppose there's some logic in that. I can't decide whether you're a rogue or a half-wit or both. Ha. However, I will give you the benefit of the doubt. (to the guards) Get out. Now, while we're reconsidering the post of jailer you may stay here in a temporary capacity.
JAILER: Thank you, Citizen. You won't regret it, I promise you.
DOCTOR: I hope not. Now, Robespierre's friends smuggled him away after the convention. The soldiers are after him. He will be caught and probably brought here.
JAILER: Ah, well we'll look after him, Citizen. Never fear.
DOCTOR: Tomorrow there will be a new bunch of prisoners, Robespierre's friends, so I hope everything will be ready, including the cells?
JAILER: Well, shall I release the prisoners, Citizen?
DOCTOR: Certainly. Now let me have the key to the dungeon.

[Opposite the Prison]

(Barbara sees soldiers arrive at the prison gates)
SOLDIER: Open up! We've got Robespierre!
IAN: The Doctor back yet?
BARBARA: No. But they've got Robespierre! I've just seen them take him into the prison.
STIRLING: Yes, we followed them here. Perhaps I'd better go and see what's happened.
IAN: You stay where you are, Stirling. You set one foot inside that prison and you'll be arrested. We must wait until Jules arrives with the carriage.
BARBARA: And you obviously didn't get to Robespierre.
IAN: No.
STIRLING: We saw him taken. He was shot in the jaw.
IAN: Jules going to be able to see us from here?
BARBARA: I think so. At least this storm will allow him to pull up in front of the prison.
STIRLING: I shall be heading for Calais. I can get a boat from there.
IAN: Good. We can save you some time. We go the same way.
STIRLING: While we're waiting, you might as well explain exactly where it is you're making for.
BARBARA: Well, as far as I can remember from the map I saw in the hideout, we head north of Paris.
IAN: Here's Jules!

[Prison corridor]

(The Doctor lets Susan out of the cell)
SUSAN: Oh, Grandfather!
DOCTOR: Ah. There, Susan. We're all going back to the ship. It's all over for you.
SUSAN: Where are the others?
DOCTOR: Well, Barbara's outside and Ian should arrive at any moment. We have a carriage waiting.
SUSAN: A carriage? Oh, that's better than a tumbril.
DOCTOR: Yes. I.
SUSAN: What's happening?
DOCTOR: They've just heard about the downfall of Robespierre. A sort of celebration, you know?
SUSAN: Oh, look!
(Robespierre is dragged in)
SOLDIER: Jailer!
JAILER: Yes. What is it about?
SOLDIER: A prisoner for you.
JAILER: Oh, Citizen Robespierre? This is indeed an honour.
SOLDIER: Don't waste your breath on him. He can't answer you back. He tried writing us a letter but, too bad we don't read, hey?
SUSAN: Let's go back to the Tardis.
DOCTOR: Yes. Yes, Susan. The rabble are far too busy to bother about us. Everybody lived in fear yesterday of that man, and today. Let's go, Susan. Let's go.

[Opposite the Prison]

JULES: Yes, the fall of Robespierre has changed everything for me.
IAN: I'm sure it has, Jules. What are you going to do now?
JULES: First I must find Jean. Then I shall wait somewhere in the country and see how this situation in Paris develops.
IAN: Going to be disturbed for a long time, I think.
JULES: Yes, I know. I wonder who will emerge as the next ruler of France?
IAN: Remember the name, Napoleon Bonaparte.
JULES: Corsican? Ruling France?
STIRLING: Well, if you're certain that's where you want to be left.
BARBARA: That's the place. We'll be safe there.
STIRLING: Yes, but I don't
BARBARA: Please. No questions. Promise?
STIRLING: Very well, if that's what you want. Now that I'm going home, I just can't wait to see England again.
BARBARA: Oh, England. I know how you feel only too well.
STIRLING: Why don't you all come with me?
BARBARA: Er, no. We must travel our way.
STIRLING: Barbara, who are you really? Where do you all come from?
JULES: Here they are!
IAN: He's got Susan!
SUSAN: Ian!
DOCTOR: Now come along. Don't stand around. It's too dangerous.
IAN: Come along. Hurry.
JULES: Come LeMaitre. We mustn't keep them waiting. I hope they have a pleasant journey.
STIRLING: So do I. But to where, Jules? Funny, I get the impression they don't know where they're heading for. Come to that, do any of us?

[Tardis]

DOCTOR: Well, I can assure you, my dear Barbara, Napoleon would never have believed you.
IAN: Yes, Doctor, but supposing we had written Napoleon a letter, telling him, you know, some of the things that were going to happen to him.
SUSAN: It wouldn't have made any difference, Ian. He'd have forgotten it, or lost it, or thought it was written by a maniac.
BARBARA: I suppose if we'd tried to kill him with a gun, the bullet would have missed him.
DOCTOR: Well, it's hardly fair to speculate, is it? No, I'm afraid you belittle things. Our lives are important, at least to us. But as we see, so we learn.
IAN: And what are we going to see and learn next, Doctor?
DOCTOR: Well, unlike the old adage, my boy, our destiny is in the stars, so let's go and search for it.

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